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Dan.com
Dynadot
Impact
110
As you may know, I haven't been as involved in the domain investing world the past few years. Now that I'm back in action, I must say, there has been a slight change for the positive. Still, to be honest, I don't personally get warm fuzzies when I think about the domaining community. You have the elite investors who jumped on dog.com and desk.com back in 1991 and could liquidate their portfolio at any given moment for millions (but never do) and anyone who didn't do that isn't worth breathing the same oxygen. That's not really fair. There is still plenty of opportunity out there—even in the world of hand registration or non-TLD extensions.

Although the overall community vibe seems to be lightening up a bit, there is still a long way to go. I see no reason to discourage newbies (or those who don't have deep pockets) when they acquire a domain that is just OK. Let people learn! Trust me, I've sold a handful of domains for a decent profit that probably weren't actually worth the registration fee. Fact is, the true value of anything is not up to us—but the buyer on the other end. The domain investor community can be a bit nasty and cynical, but it doesn't need to be. Why bark criticisms at strangers for acquiring a domain that is below your standards of brandability? If you think about it, this is one of the few industries where there is literally NO competition. My portfolio doesn't compete with anyone else's because domains can only belong to one person at a time. We are not a threat to each other. So let's continue to help, support, and uplift each other. You never know what someone's challenges are and it costs you nothing to be kind. The best thing we can do for all of us is normalize the domain name aftermarket in mainstream culture. Keep the conversation positive and it will raise all boats!
 
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Impact
29,342
We are not a threat to each other. So let's continue to help, support, and uplift each other. You never know what someone's challenges are and it costs you nothing to be kind. The best thing we can do for all of us is normalize the domain name aftermarket in mainstream culture.
I agree with the spirit of your well-written and eloquent post, @tomalley and look forward to you posting more often going forward.

With respect to the part I highlight, I think that is absolutely true. The more that it just becomes natural for end users to look in the aftermarket, and the more positive their interactions are with domain investors, the better that is for all of us. It is important, not just for them, but for all of us, that every single domainer acts professional at all times.

Thanks again,

Bob
 

FolioTeam

AMDB.tv
Impact
6,491
I agree with the spirit of your well-written and eloquent post, @tomalley and look forward to you posting more often going forward.

With respect to the part I highlight, I think that is absolutely true. The more that it just becomes natural for end users to look in the aftermarket, and the more positive their interactions are with domain investors, the better that is for all of us. It is important, not just for them, but for all of us, that every single domainer acts professional at all times.

Thanks again,

Bob
I agree
 

PeakDots

Top Contributor
Impact
2,122
We live in a world of different personalities.

Being negative is one. Unfortunately some people are never happy and love to pass their unhappiness onto others.
I work on a daily basis with such people and it's hard to get them to be positive about anything. It just doesn't happen

I do agree with you
Be positive, stay positive

Peace
 
Impact
1,601
As you may know, I haven't been as involved in the domain investing world the past few years. Now that I'm back in action, I must say, there has been a slight change for the positive. Still, to be honest, I don't personally get warm fuzzies when I think about the domaining community. You have the elite investors who jumped on dog.com and desk.com back in 1991 and could liquidate their portfolio at any given moment for millions (but never do) and anyone who didn't do that isn't worth breathing the same oxygen. That's not really fair. There is still plenty of opportunity out there—even in the world of hand registration or non-TLD extensions.

Although the overall community vibe seems to be lightening up a bit, there is still a long way to go. I see no reason to discourage newbies (or those who don't have deep pockets) when they acquire a domain that is just OK. Let people learn! Trust me, I've sold a handful of domains for a decent profit that probably weren't actually worth the registration fee. Fact is, the true value of anything is not up to us—but the buyer on the other end. The domain investor community can be a bit nasty and cynical, but it doesn't need to be. Why bark criticisms at strangers for acquiring a domain that is below your standards of brandability? If you think about it, this is one of the few industries where there is literally NO competition. My portfolio doesn't compete with anyone else's because domains can only belong to one person at a time. We are not a threat to each other. So let's continue to help, support, and uplift each other. You never know what someone's challenges are and it costs you nothing to be kind. The best thing we can do for all of us is normalize the domain name aftermarket in mainstream culture. Keep the conversation positive and it will raise all boats!

Finally a common sense post, thanks for this.

Wait till the troll army will find it, getting my popcorn ready :)
 
Impact
110
Finally a common sense post, thanks for this.

Wait till the troll army will find it, getting my popcorn ready :)
giphy.gif
 

Ategy

Arif M, NameCult.com TheDomainSocial.com
Impact
17,288
Wait till the troll army will find it, getting my popcorn ready :)
That in itself could be considered trolling! ;)

I haven't been as involved in the domain investing world the past few years.
Welcome back!

You have the elite investors who jumped on dog.com and desk.com back in 1991 and could liquidate their portfolio at any given moment for millions (but never do) and anyone who didn't do that isn't worth breathing the same oxygen.
I don't really understand this ... as I'm not sure where you're is coming from? Of the big name "elites", most just do their own thing. With the possible exception of one or two, all are friendly/polite or at the very least neutral. There most certainly are squabbles in the industry, but not really with regards to the context of new investors.

That's not really fair. There is still plenty of opportunity out there—even in the world of hand registration or non-TLD extensions.
Again .. I don't really know anyone who says there's no opportunity in hand-regs. It's certainly easier and sometimes safer for new domainers to go the aftermarket/expired route, and many people will say that in a helpful way. But again, not many people saying there's zero opportunity in hand-regs. (I've been too busy to poke my head in the appraisals section lately, so if things have indeed gotten a lot ruder then I stand corrected, although in general I always felt most were trying to be genuinely helpful .. regardless as if to they were actually correct or not)

I've sold a handful of domains for a decent profit that probably weren't actually worth the registration fee.
I think anyone who's sold more than a handful of domains understands that! Always the ones you least suspect! I'm in the middle of one of those now! lol :)

Fact is, the true value of anything is not up to us—but the buyer on the other end.
What someone will pay for any specific domain yes ... however .. the goal of new domainers should be to recognise quality .. and more importantly .. to recognise the probability of sale at various price-points / multiples. If experienced members with sales see bad domains, they should (politely and constructively) discourage that newcomer to continue their current path. The unfortunate truth is that most people who try will never make a long-term profit domaining. :(

If you think about it, this is one of the few industries where there is literally NO competition. My portfolio doesn't compete with anyone else's because domains can only belong to one person at a time.
If you own Dog.com then you have no competition. But most domains held by new domainers most certainly do have alternatives .. and therefore indeed do have competition. Still doesn't mean we can't help each other for karmic reasons though! :)

You never know what someone's challenges are and it costs you nothing to be kind.
That's one thing I can 100% agree with.

The best thing we can do for all of us is normalize the domain name aftermarket in mainstream culture. Keep the conversation positive and it will raise all boats!
The only way to truly raise domainer boats and to make the pie bigger is indeed increase education and awareness of the value of domains to outsiders and potential end users. As that will in turn increase end user demand and prices. Adding more domainers mainly just increases wholesale prices .. so mainly just good for those who flip to other domainers and for registrars who resell expired domains.

Keeping the conversation positive within the community doesn't really actually help in that regard. Although it does help us stay slightly more zen and sane .. and people shouldn't need a reason to be nice/polite.

It is important, not just for them, but for all of us, that every single domainer acts professional at all times.
Yes .. that should be the minimum! (y)

We need more of these positive posts to keep everybody motivated and engaged.
Not to jump on you or to be negative in a thread about negativity .. lol .. but no .. we don't need positive posts just for the sake of having positive posts. They're kinda pointless. People who are going to be nice will continue to be nice, and those with an aversion to it will likely always be a little sharper in tone. As already hinted to by others above who mentioned popcorn .. saying things like the community still has a long way to go is in itself asking for issues. While some of you who haven't participated much over the years might not see it, those of us who are engaged with this community have seen this very conversation on virtually a monthly basis. They don't really tend to change anything. You can find a bunch of them here (where this thread should have been started btw ;) lol):
https://www.namepros.com/forums/namepros-help-and-feedback.9/

The actual way to keep everyone motivated and engaged is by contributing in helpful ways in on-topic discussions. It's actually pretty simple. ;)

A bigger problem than anything else is not a small handful of people who are rude .. it's all the friendly people who don't participate nor get involved. Seriously .. to all you lurkers out there .. just start typing .. get involved .. say hello .. share your opinions! :)

Start here if you haven't already ..
https://www.namepros.com/forums/networking-meet-and-greet.49/

Beyond that, even newcomers can find ways to contribute to the community. You don't need to be a domaining expert to be able to offer things of substance.
 
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Indianad

Established Member
Impact
353
As you may know, I haven't been as involved in the domain investing world the past few years. Now that I'm back in action, I must say, there has been a slight change for the positive. Still, to be honest, I don't personally get warm fuzzies when I think about the domaining community. You have the elite investors who jumped on dog.com and desk.com back in 1991 and could liquidate their portfolio at any given moment for millions (but never do) and anyone who didn't do that isn't worth breathing the same oxygen. That's not really fair. There is still plenty of opportunity out there—even in the world of hand registration or non-TLD extensions.

Although the overall community vibe seems to be lightening up a bit, there is still a long way to go. I see no reason to discourage newbies (or those who don't have deep pockets) when they acquire a domain that is just OK. Let people learn! Trust me, I've sold a handful of domains for a decent profit that probably weren't actually worth the registration fee. Fact is, the true value of anything is not up to us—but the buyer on the other end. The domain investor community can be a bit nasty and cynical, but it doesn't need to be. Why bark criticisms at strangers for acquiring a domain that is below your standards of brandability? If you think about it, this is one of the few industries where there is literally NO competition. My portfolio doesn't compete with anyone else's because domains can only belong to one person at a time. We are not a threat to each other. So let's continue to help, support, and uplift each other. You never know what someone's challenges are and it costs you nothing to be kind. The best thing we can do for all of us is normalize the domain name aftermarket in mainstream culture. Keep the conversation positive and it will raise all boats!

Welcome back and thank you for embracing “civility.” Sometimes we forget...the underlying goal of NPs is to...learn and earn. Again...Thank you.
 

WatchDogue

Top Contributor
Impact
17,684
There is a core, albeit small, of NamePros members who tend to be hospitable and welcoming to new members and answering, within reason, their questions.

My opinion is, get 'em off to a pleasant start and perhaps they will grow and prosper at NamePros and eventually extend welcomes and help down the line to others.

And it seems to me the general overall tone of most ( not all ) NamePros discussions these days are usually reasonably hospitable, although like a light switch, hospitable tones can and occasionally suddenly switch on and off.

Hope your return to a more active NamePros participation is enjoyable.
 
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I don't really think blind positivity is a great thing.
I don't think negativity is always a bad thing.

They both have their place.

In fairness, a lot of what is seen as "negativity" is just being practical or realistic.
Some people have wildly unrealistic expectations.

You can be as positive as you want. It is unlikely to overcome poor decisions.

I agree that being overly negative is not helpful, but at the same time many new investors would be better off getting to the point rather than sugarcoating it.

Things don't always go as planned. That is probably why about 80% of small businesses fail.

Most successful people tend to consider all different possibilities, including the negative ones. It helps in preparation.

Brad
 
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The domain investor community can be a bit nasty and cynical, but it doesn't need to be. Why bark criticisms at strangers for acquiring a domain that is below your standards of brandability?

That is most likely to happen in the appraisal section.

You are getting free appraisals. There is no point asking for an appraisal if you don't want honest opinions. Some domains are objectively bad.

If you explain why, that is actually being positive, not negative.

Brad
 
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Impact
3,039
I agree with you that domaining community is in general negative which is not easy on new comers who can easily get discouraged and stressed. I prefer positivity over negativity and I always try to look at the full half rather than the empty one.

Criticism is harsh and hard to be taken but it is healthy and beneficial because it helps us to learn and improve. Criticism can be seen as positive thing if it was said nicely and politely, it is all about attitude and respecting each other. Two persons can say the same thing but it will sound totally different when said nicely vs rudely. For example if you criticize a website design you can say "This red banner is ugly shit" vs "I wonder if you consider replacing this red banner with a green one, it might look more professional and appealing"
 
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