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Hey everyone,
Here's my first attempt at a helpful article for us NP'ers: Domain Apprasial. If this isn't in the right section, please move it ;)

Article: How to better help a domain owner determine a domain's value


Many appraisers on NamePros simply post "Low to mid $xx" or "Low $xx IMO" or "High $xxx" without stating a reason for his/her valuation. In this thread, I hope to better the NamePros appraisal forum by providing suggestions for how appraisers can better assist the owner of a domain determine the value of his/her name in several different situations. To start off, let's look at the different types of major extensions in the most common order of what they're worth.

.com is the commercial extension. Typically, .com domains are worth the most.
.net used to be a "network" extension; however, it fits forums well and is used when the .com version of a domain isn't available.
.org is the most 'restricited' of the top 3 TLD's. By 'restricted', I mean that many .org names aren't worth much at all unless they are obviously useable for a nonprofit organization. Recently, however, with many other TLD's being taken, the value of a good .org has increased.
.biz is the business extension. Although not widely used, some businesses do have .biz domains. A commercial keyword ending with .biz can be quite valuble.
.us means .United States. Domains that would be usable to a United States reseller aiming its products at the U.S. market can be worth a good amount in .us.
.info domains are an intereted batch. .info domains can be registered for under $3; additionally, a premium .info domain is typically worth less than a premium .com or .net. There are exceptions; some buyers do indeed value .info's over other domains because of factors such as universality.

When appraising a domain, be sure to keep the following factors in mind: keyword frequency, length of the name, extension and relevancy of the extension.
Keyword frequency in search can be determined using the Google AdWords Keyword Tool. The more searches conducted on a particular keyword or set of keywords, the more valuble that keyword or set of keywords is as a domain name.
Length of the domain name is another important factor; users have an easier time remembering shorter names. In addition, longer domains may recieve less traffic than competitors because users simply don't want to type in computerdiscussions.com when they could go to pctalk.com, which is (let's pretend, at least) of similar or equal quality.
Relevancy of the extension is the most important factor in appraising a domain name. For example, EuropeanUnion.us does not fit its extension in that the EU is not a United States body. Another example: buycars.org may try to be a commercial site. However, since .org is typically used for non-profit groups, the site may not have much success.

Remember to keep all of the factors in mind when appraising a domain. Also, say more than "Mid $xx". Tell the owner what he/she needs to know to develop a sense of the domain's value.

~ Also include what you would pay ~

Recently, many appraisals here at NP have been based around what the appraiser thinks the value of the domain name is to a another reseller and to an end user. That's good, but it may not be all that helpful to the owner of the domain being appraised. Why?

The real value of a domain is what it sells for.
If you think that someone else may pay $250 (low $xxx) for a domain, but you're a frequent domain buyer and you're only willing to pay $25, then you should state that in the post. Tell the owner what you would pay, even if it's only $5. Here's why: if 5-15 appraisers are only willing to pay $5, the domain is likely worth $5 in the reseller market.

Example: if your domain recieves 10 appraisals, and 8 people say that it's only worth $10 because they aren't looking to develop a website around such a topic, then it gives the owner a good idea of what the domain is actually worth to domain resellers.

However, if the two remaining appraisers would pay $xxx because they plan to develop a website around that topic or may be interested in or capable of doing so, then the owner has an idea of approximately what percentage of the domain/website development market his or her domain name is marketable to.

Summary: in addition to reseller & development value estimations, tell the owner of a domain what you personally would pay for the domain, no matter how low, because a domain is only worth what it sells for.

~ Example: ~

Sports.us is the domain being appraised. You'd go to Overture and find that many people searched for "sports". You realize that sports are played in the United States, so the extension is relevant. The domain is short and sweet, adding to its value. Also, there are tons of results on Google for "sports". So you'd say:

"Since 'sports' had X searches this January on Overture and since it's very short and memorable, I'd say you could sell it for [price] to an end user and [price] to a domain investor. The extension doesn't hurt if you can find a user with a sports site targeting the United States market."

~ Example #2: ~

MarketForums.net is the domain being appraised (using this one b/c I own it). I'm the appraiser. I go to Overture and find high results for 'market' and 'forums', but not 'market forums'. On Google, however, there are surprisingly many results for "market forums", probably meaning that there's a large interest in the subject. So, search results are OK for this domain. The extension would be better in .com; however, .net does not bring the value down too much considering that many .net is often used for forums.

For an international market forum, this domain is good. To a developer wanting to start up a United States stock market forum, however, MarketForums.us may be better. To a domain investor, MarketForums.net would be the pick over MarketForums.us.

~ Example #3: Country Code Extensions ~

Beaches.sc (also mine) is the domain up for appraisal. On first sight, you might say "Registration fee; the extension hurts it." However, upon using your friend Google to research the .sc extension, you find that the ext. was created for the Seychelles, a beautiful French archipelago and a great tourist/vacation destination. In your appraisal, you should include that because the U.S. market for tourism to French lands is down at the moment because we're munching on freedom fries, beaches.sc could be used as .South Carolina.

Overture tells you that there are hundreds of thousands of results for beaches in South Carolina like Myrtle Beach. Enlighten the domain owner to the fact that with a good amount of development as a South Carolina beach information site, beaches.sc is an excellent keyword domain and would be worth [price]. However, to a domain investor, .sc may mean "source" (like whois.sc); "beaches source" makes no sense and wouldn't be worth much at all.

~ Example #4: 3-Letter Domains ~
When your appraise three-letter domains, take two main things into consideration: if the letters mean anything or are an acronym and the quality of the extension. FYI.co.in is likely worth more that QYX.com because FYI means "For Your Information", whereas QYX does not have a widely known meaning. 3-letter domains (LLL - Letter Letter Letter) are typically more valuble than LNL (Letter Number Letter) or NNL or NLN names because they're easier to pronounce.

~ Helping the domain owner: ~

Tell the person who posted the domain all of this info, including what market(s) the domain would be most valuble in and why. It helps him/her get a better feel for the value of the domain in different situations with different buyers. You should also get a feel for the value of certain extensions and for whether the market is "bull" or "bear". To keep up with the market, frequent sites such at DNJournal.com and the NamePros sales forums to see how much names are going for.

If you enjoyed my article and think other NP'ers could benefit from it, please send some $NP this way so I can sticky the thread.

Happy appraising! B-)
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
Did not really know where to post this but I feel it needs to be addressed. There seems to be many domains being appraised with a quick "Reg fee" or $0. I have seen this increase in frequency over the last month or so and, not to name names, it generally appears to be the same "appraisers" every time. I am not sure if the incentive of free $np's for appraisal's has anything to do with this but it may be a contributing factor. IMO If you are giving an appraisal GIVE an appraisal, one word answers of reg fee, $0 or low $xx with no explaination of why helps no one! Either you give an appraisal or don't! JMHO
 
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I agree with everything you said. I posted this in another thread yesterday.

I quit posting domains on the Appraisal Forum. I think they need a new section called "Educated Appraisals". I have found that people don't do any research before they post an appraisal.

I will generally do the research when I post an appraisal. I will see what extensions are taken, Word Tracker, PPC, Google Results, similar sales, etc.

It seems like people building post counts with "Reg Fee", or giving some ridiculous value for an average name.

Brad


Len said:
Did not really know where to post this but I feel it needs to be addressed. There seems to be many domains being appraised with a quick "Reg fee" or $0. I have seen this increase in frequency over the last month or so and, not to name names, it generally appears to be the same "appraisers" every time. I am not sure if the incentive of free $np's for appraisal's has anything to do with this but it may be a contributing factor. IMO If you are giving an appraisal GIVE an appraisal, one word answers of reg fee, $0 or low $xx with no explaination of why helps no one! Either you give an appraisal or don't! JMHO
 
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If there was such a split between nominal appraisals and 'advanced' appraisals, there would have to be some compensation for the ones doing advanced work and enough monitoring to make the board useful. I am more than happy to put the time into educating even the most newbie guy that comes in but it does take time and most people do not see a reward for their efforts.

Free appraisal boards like this are radically informative and useful. Not only do they bring new users to the forums but for every newbie who learns and understands the true value of the domains, we add a buyer and a seller of quality prouct to our list!
 
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"When appraising a domain, be sure to keep the following factors in mind: keyword frequency, length of the name, extension and relevancy of the extension.
Keyword frequency in search can be determined using the Overture search frequency tool. The more searches conducted on a particular keyword or set of keywords, the more valuble that keyword or set of keywords is as a domain name.
Length of the domain name is another important factor; users have an easier time remembering shorter names. In addition, longer domains may recieve less traffic than competitors because users simply don't want to type in computerdiscussions.com when they could go to pctalk.com, which is (let's pretend, at least) of similar or equal quality.
Relevancy of the extension is the most important factor in appraising a domain name. For example, EuropeanUnion.us does not fit its extension in that the EU is not a United States body. Another example: buycars"

Quite usefull advise!

"When appraising a domain, be sure to keep the following factors in mind: keyword frequency, length of the name, extension and relevancy of the extension.
Keyword frequency in search can be determined using the Overture search frequency tool. The more searches conducted on a particular keyword or set of keywords, the more valuble that keyword or set of keywords is as a domain name.
Length of the domain name is another important factor; users have an easier time remembering shorter names. In addition, longer domains may recieve less traffic than competitors because users simply don't want to type in computerdiscussions.com when they could go to pctalk.com, which is (let's pretend, at least) of similar or equal quality."

Quite usefull advise!
 
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hello everybody i'm new to this site i have some domains i would like assesed all are for sale and can be pushed to auction at sedo .
as i said i'm new at this and would appreciate advice
843486.com the hun pornsite
89465336.com txholdem poker
4664533627.com googledocs
4653.biz gold
4653.us gold
3962368.com dynadot
347639.info disney
768666353.mobi potnoodle
moberry.mobi mobile/blackberry
4664533627.mobi googledocs
altd.mobi
primedollar.mobi
wordz.mobi
clikz.mobi
9o9.biz
london-newyork.com
fri-sat.com
18-65.com
las-lax.com airport standard coding
lax-las.com airport standard coding
3285.co.uk fcuk french connection
smirnov.me most popular russian surname
muller.me most popular german surname
zhang.me worlds most common surname
sie.me german for "you"
ich.me german for "me"
soldi.me italian for money
dinero.me spanish for " money"
kato.me 9th most popular japanese name
smithy.me smith very common surname
browny.me brown very comon surname
manx.me
cbbc.me
viaco.me viacom
4ani.me for animation
 
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RE : The Unofficial NP Domain Appraisal Guide

This article is very informative and its use and we get knowledge in this recession time.
 
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I don't know if this has been posted in the thread already.

When someone appraises your domain name as "reg fee," that term is only a technicality, as it is out of necessity worth to you what you paid for it.

Usually what an evaluation of the value of your name as "reg fee" means is that you have a worthless domain (worth 0$) and you would be lucky if you could sell it back to someone for the amount you paid for it.
 
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One other suggestion is to not post comments like "my great domain" or "premium domain" that give some indication that have already self-appraised your domain. In many cases, the people appraising your domain may differ from your opinion. Many times, I find people who post these comments, then get into a debate with the appraisals of "reg fee" or "worthless".
 
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This thread is very informative :)
Pretty new here so this really helps.
 
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Thanks a lot for the post. I hope to read more from you.
 
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what do you think phdelivery.net??Does anyone want it ??I will sell it in a low price.
 
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Thanks this information was helpful. It is hard to value domain names. Thanks

Thanks for the information. This is very helpful.

Hey everyone,
Here's my first attempt at a helpful article for us NP'ers: Domain Apprasial. If this isn't in the right section, please move it ;)

Article: How to better help a domain owner determine a domain's value


Many appraisers on NamePros simply post "Low to mid $xx" or "Low $xx IMO" or "High $xxx" without stating a reason for his/her valuation. In this thread, I hope to better the NamePros appraisal forum by providing suggestions for how appraisers can better assist the owner of a domain determine the value of his/her name in several different situations. To start off, let's look at the different types of major extensions in the most common order of what they're worth.

.com is the commercial extension. Typically, .com domains are worth the most.
.net used to be a "network" extension; however, it fits forums well and is used when the .com version of a domain isn't available.
.org is the most 'restricited' of the top 3 TLD's. By 'restricted', I mean that many .org names aren't worth much at all unless they are obviously useable for a nonprofit organization. Recently, however, with many other TLD's being taken, the value of a good .org has increased.
.biz is the business extension. Although not widely used, some businesses do have .biz domains. A commercial keyword ending with .biz can be quite valuble.
.us means .United States. Domains that would be usable to a United States reseller aiming its products at the U.S. market can be worth a good amount in .us.
.info domains are an intereted batch. .info domains can be registered for under $3; additionally, a premium .info domain is typically worth less than a premium .com or .net. There are exceptions; some buyers do indeed value .info's over other domains because of factors such as universality.

When appraising a domain, be sure to keep the following factors in mind: keyword frequency, length of the name, extension and relevancy of the extension.
Keyword frequency in search can be determined using the Overture search frequency tool. The more searches conducted on a particular keyword or set of keywords, the more valuble that keyword or set of keywords is as a domain name.
Length of the domain name is another important factor; users have an easier time remembering shorter names. In addition, longer domains may recieve less traffic than competitors because users simply don't want to type in computerdiscussions.com when they could go to pctalk.com, which is (let's pretend, at least) of similar or equal quality.
Relevancy of the extension is the most important factor in appraising a domain name. For example, EuropeanUnion.us does not fit its extension in that the EU is not a United States body. Another example: buycars.org may try to be a commercial site. However, since .org is typically used for non-profit groups, the site may not have much success.

Remember to keep all of the factors in mind when appraising a domain. Also, say more than "Mid $xx". Tell the owner what he/she needs to know to develop a sense of the domain's value.

~ Also include what you would pay ~

Recently, many appraisals here at NP have been based around what the appraiser thinks the value of the domain name is to a another reseller and to an end user. That's good, but it may not be all that helpful to the owner of the domain being appraised. Why?

The real value of a domain is what it sells for.
If you think that someone else may pay $250 (low $xxx) for a domain, but you're a frequent domain buyer and you're only willing to pay $25, then you should state that in the post. Tell the owner what you would pay, even if it's only $5. Here's why: if 5-15 appraisers are only willing to pay $5, the domain is likely worth $5 in the reseller market.

Example: if your domain recieves 10 appraisals, and 8 people say that it's only worth $10 because they aren't looking to develop a website around such a topic, then it gives the owner a good idea of what the domain is actually worth to domain resellers.

However, if the two remaining appraisers would pay $xxx because they plan to develop a website around that topic or may be interested in or capable of doing so, then the owner has an idea of approximately what percentage of the domain/website development market his or her domain name is marketable to.

Summary: in addition to reseller & development value estimations, tell the owner of a domain what you personally would pay for the domain, no matter how low, because a domain is only worth what it sells for.

~ Example: ~

Sports.us is the domain being appraised. You'd go to Overture and find that many people searched for "sports". You realize that sports are played in the United States, so the extension is relevant. The domain is short and sweet, adding to its value. Also, there are tons of results on Google for "sports". So you'd say:

"Since 'sports' had X searches this January on Overture and since it's very short and memorable, I'd say you could sell it for [price] to an end user and [price] to a domain investor. The extension doesn't hurt if you can find a user with a sports site targeting the United States market."

~ Example #2: ~

MarketForums.net is the domain being appraised (using this one b/c I own it). I'm the appraiser. I go to Overture and find high results for 'market' and 'forums', but not 'market forums'. On Google, however, there are surprisingly many results for "market forums", probably meaning that there's a large interest in the subject. So, search results are OK for this domain. The extension would be better in .com; however, .net does not bring the value down too much considering that many .net is often used for forums.

For an international market forum, this domain is good. To a developer wanting to start up a United States stock market forum, however, MarketForums.us may be better. To a domain investor, MarketForums.net would be the pick over MarketForums.us.

~ Example #3: Country Code Extensions ~

Beaches.sc (also mine) is the domain up for appraisal. On first sight, you might say "Registration fee; the extension hurts it." However, upon using your friend Google to research the .sc extension, you find that the ext. was created for the Seychelles, a beautiful French archipelago and a great tourist/vacation destination. In your appraisal, you should include that because the U.S. market for tourism to French lands is down at the moment because we're munching on freedom fries, beaches.sc could be used as .South Carolina.

Overture tells you that there are hundreds of thousands of results for beaches in South Carolina like Myrtle Beach. Enlighten the domain owner to the fact that with a good amount of development as a South Carolina beach information site, beaches.sc is an excellent keyword domain and would be worth [price]. However, to a domain investor, .sc may mean "source" (like whois.sc); "beaches source" makes no sense and wouldn't be worth much at all.

~ Example #4: 3-Letter Domains ~
When your appraise three-letter domains, take two main things into consideration: if the letters mean anything or are an acronym and the quality of the extension. FYI.co.in is likely worth more that QYX.com because FYI means "For Your Information", whereas QYX does not have a widely known meaning. 3-letter domains (LLL - Letter Letter Letter) are typically more valuble than LNL (Letter Number Letter) or NNL or NLN names because they're easier to pronounce.

~ Helping the domain owner: ~

Tell the person who posted the domain all of this info, including what market(s) the domain would be most valuble in and why. It helps him/her get a better feel for the value of the domain in different situations with different buyers. You should also get a feel for the value of certain extensions and for whether the market is "bull" or "bear". To keep up with the market, frequent sites such at DNJournal.com and the NamePros sales forums to see how much names are going for.

If you enjoyed my article and think other NP'ers could benefit from it, please send some $NP this way so I can sticky the thread.

Happy appraising! B-)
 
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@bmugford

I totally agree with you dude! Someone should give credit to whom credit is due... although there can be pieces of good information, they're too scattered and sometimes tiring to read one-by-one...

-newbie mode
 
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I found this article very useful, i'm a newbie and it's good to know what kind of feedback I should expect when asking for a domain name of mine to be appraised. Be that good or bad, you have to be told as it is. Thanks for this interesting article, it's priceless.

coolydude

Good or bad, I need to know, tell me as it is..
 
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I found this article very useful, i'm a newbie and it's good to know what kind of feedback I should expect when asking for a domain name of mine to be appraised. Be that good or bad, you have to be told as it is. Thanks for this interesting article, it's priceless.

coolydude

Good or bad, I need to know, tell me as it is..
Mind that no domain appraisal websites are 100% correct.You have to do your own research to get the answer. Some websites are making a lot of money by providing appraisal services which are not value for money.

I use name911.com for appraisal cause its free and provide lot more info than paid sites.
 
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"When appraising a domain, be sure to keep the following factors in mind: keyword frequency, length of the name, extension and relevancy of the extension.
Keyword frequency in search can be determined using the Overture search frequency tool. The more searches conducted on a particular keyword or set of keywords, the more valuble that keyword or set of keywords is as a domain name.
Length of the domain name is another important factor; users have an easier time remembering shorter names. In addition, longer domains may recieve less traffic than competitors because users simply don't want to type in computerdiscussions.com when they could go to pctalk.com, which is (let's pretend, at least) of similar or equal quality.
Relevancy of the extension is the most important factor in appraising a domain name. For example, EuropeanUnion.us does not fit its extension in that the EU is not a United States body. Another example: buycars""

What about non-latin keywords which would be transliterated to latin domain names?
Any suggestions how to appraise those?
 
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I would appraise this article in mid to high $xxx. :)
 
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thank you for this eye catching information you provided .
 
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Awesome instructions given many years ago, thanks.

Thread title says "The Unofficial NP Domain Appraisal Guide", just shocked for a movement because I Just added my domain Unoffici.al for appraisal.

Thanks.
 
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Good information, thanks.
 
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Thanks for the article! It answered a question of mine I've had... where to go to look up key words in a domain.. Overture. However realizing this was posted in 2005.... maybe we can get an updated version? Maybe there are better sites to use for appraisal references? Or possibly there are new tips or ways that help with appraisals 18yrs later?😉
 
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thanks dear, for most valuable knowledge about. 🙏🙏
 
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