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question Suspicious buyers, what is the angle?

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So I have this domain name robot.earth, listed at another site. I will be listing more here because this place seems real, so I'll ask a real question. I've been through one domain sale in the past, and it was a large one. I found a couple buyers, they bid each other up, I ended up finding a broker who lived in Portugal to finalize it all, which prob helped being a noob, and got paid through Escrow.com. it was great.

It's been years since. Someone contacts me about robot.earth, offers me five figures, a bit above a high price I had placed on it, because it's appraised value is 2-3k max probably, though it is a good name, but it's still a weird TLD. So I don't want to get in the way of this sale, and trying to do what the customer wants rapidly. They want to get paid through Quickbooks payments, which is a legit biz site, but they don't care how I'm going to get them the domain. 'We'll handle it after you invoice
my friend".

So I set up a QB account, not having one already. I tell him I want to know the registrar I'm transferring to and an email, because I want to deliver this domain name ASAP after payment. He sends me - Godaddy (suprising not) and an email. I call Godaddy, and they have no email, no business name I've been given, none of it. So then the party in my head ends.

QB claims they don't do refunds on their payments system. Debates are settled by the parties. I never sent out the invoice because I don't want to get into some debate about inconsistencies with a scammer, though I certainly wanted the sale. The email he gave me is attached to a domain not commonly used, though it is a common word - accountant.com. There's some company called world.com "company accelerator" this name is owned by. They seem to have a long list of seriously valuable straight domain names - for sale, or maybe just to sign email addresses to, I have no idea. So that part of the story kind of checks out, but not really, because literally anyone can prob get an email on one of these domains. Plus that world.com site is super opaque in its intent. Pretty odd stuff.

So I tell the guy I need a functioning email at the host to transfer to, or use escrow.com and he tells me that they wanted to spend six figures on this and other domains, but there's too much back and forth and his 'friend' is losing patience, classic scam talk. We've literally been in regular correspondence 4 days after the initial start with gaps on both sides. Since when is domain selling a second by second activity?

So I guess I'm just wondering how this con works, is it just weird incompetent buyers (doubt it). They're not supposed to be able to get bank numbers through QB which filters them out. Why bother with this approach, except maybe to claim they didn't get what they paid for, and start making my life difficult. It really ticks me off also, the arrogance mixed with the cluelessness, but that's the type to pull something like this. They are using a gmail account (with a single number at the end). I have half a mind to report it, but if these are nefarious types, prob better just to wave bye.
 
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Maybe it's the set up for a, "There's a problem with QuickBooks, let's use GetScammed instead."

Part of the scamming process is to set up a trust-worthy front, and then exhaust the victim with complications so that they just want to get it over with.

Or maybe they ran into a KYC issue. Who knows? Who cares? Tell them that you only use escrow.com and if that doesn't work then you're not interested. If they want it and can afford it then they'll get it.
 
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A massively organized prank perhaps, by one of your "friends"?
 
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Indeed, Just as MKA states above. There's nothing new here. The scam buyer wants to give you the impression that the clock is running down unless things move forward quickly. And his stupid 'icing-on-the-cake' suggestion that his buyer is looking to spend a small fortune (loads of money) but is loosing patience.

What a Joker. We all know that these scammers do get away with these string-along frauds and it will only get worse. There are many and varied angles that these guys use but, they all follow the same pattern. I'm not sure why they would target your particular domain name though, doesn't seem very desirable to me as a dot earth. I hope your not trying to Hype your own domain here
 
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I'm not sure why they would target your particular domain name though

“If he registered this name, he’ll fall for anything” 😂 I agree with MKA it sounds like an exhaustion scam of some variety.
 
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I'd move-on to the next sale. It is a sketchy scenario but nothing new.
 
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The email he gave me is attached to a domain not commonly used, though it is a common word - accountant.com. There's some company called world.com "company accelerator" this name is owned by. They seem to have a long list of seriously valuable straight domain names - for sale, or maybe just to sign email addresses to, I have no idea. So that part of the story kind of checks out, but not really, because literally anyone can prob get an email on one of these domains. Plus that world.com site is super opaque in its intent. Pretty odd stuff.

@accountant.com and many other emails available for free at: signup.mail.com

Screenshot_20240531-112830~2.png
 
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Indeed, Just as MKA states above. There's nothing new here. The scam buyer wants to give you the impression that the clock is running down unless things move forward quickly. And his stupid 'icing-on-the-cake' suggestion that his buyer is looking to spend a small fortune (loads of money) but is loosing patience.

What a Joker. We all know that these scammers do get away with these string-along frauds and it will only get worse. There are many and varied angles that these guys use but, they all follow the same pattern. I'm not sure why they would target your particular domain name though, doesn't seem very desirable to me as a dot earth. I hope your not trying to Hype your own domain here
This would be a pretty elaborate story to create to hype my domain and I've sold one big domain in the past, so I'm closer to an amateur than a pro. I'm new to this site, happy it seems legit, no, I don't play those games. In the con business, the mark wants to believe, so they assist the con, but I'm over it. They've disappeared.
 
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I'd move-on to the next sale. It is a sketchy scenario but nothing new.
They've stopped corresponding. If someone wants something for real, then they try to buy it, not try not to buy it.
 
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This would be a pretty elaborate story to create to hype my domain and I've sold one big domain in the past, so I'm closer to an amateur than a pro.
No real offence intended, hence my careful wording not to mislabel yourself
It's unfortunate but you'd be surprised at the lengths and means a few (mostly new members) will go to just to get their domains hyped and read. They usually start with some outrageous offer received, a long story why it didn't get paid and a hope they've influenced someone here, never works but doesn't stop them trying.

Stay around and you'll see
 
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