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question Security concerns. Looking for advice.

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Jose A

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Hello ppl. I have a question. Two questions actually:

I hired a domainer (with a good number of positive reviews) on Fiverr to help me create accounts in my name on different domain-selling platforms, like Dan, Squadhelp, Dynadot and so on.

Of course, to do that he requires some sensitive information, such as my name, address, phone, email, etc.

I anticipated he was going to ask that kind of personal stuff before hiring him, and I was kind of OK about it.

What worries me somehow is that he also asks "The email you provided above, is it the same email you used to buy the domain names? if not, Please share the email through which you bought the domain names."

The thing is, for security reasons, I have one exclusive email address for my domain portfolio, which I don't ever use for anything else, and I explained that to him.

To which he replied "It might make some problems in the owner verification. I have faced some issues in the past if the ownership's mail and listing mails are different."

In my experience, the ownership verification is usually made by adding a TXT record with a string given by the platform, or something like that.

So, my two questions are:

- Have any of you ever needed to do an owner verification on those platforms that needed to enter the email address used to register the domain?

- Do you find it risky to share that information?

I'd appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks for reading.
 

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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
Your email address is your driver license on the internet.
NEVER give your driver license to anyone.
Your wife or your son may be ok but stranger is a NO NO NO
 
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I would be very hesitant to give that information to some person from a website like Fiverr.

Brad
 
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I hired a domainer (with a good number of positive reviews) on Fiverr to help me create accounts in my name on different domain-selling platforms, like Dan, Squadhelp, Dynadot and so on.
Why did you hire someone to create the account when you could've done it yourself?

You don't need to use the same e-mail as the one you bought the domains to create accounts at marketplaces.
 
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Why did you hire someone to create the account when you could've done it yourself?

You don't need to use the same e-mail as the one you bought the domains to create accounts at marketplaces.

I'm kind of starting in the domining business, so I'm trying to get knowledge from many different sources.

So, he offered me to sign me up in 8 different platforms, which he didn't mention. So, besides the already known marketplaces, I'm hoping he may knows about some insider's marketplace or something like that.

Also, the service include appraisal and posting of 10 domains on each platform, with a (catchy, I hope) description for each one.
 
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I'm kind of starting in the domining business, so I'm trying to get knowledge from many different sources.

So, he offered me to sign me up in 8 different platforms, which he didn't mention. So, besides the already known marketplaces, I'm hoping he may knows about some insider's marketplace or something like that.

Also, the service include appraisal and posting of 10 domains on each platform, with a (catchy, I hope) description for each one.
If he was any good he would be spending his time on his own domain portfolio.

Besides, listing domains for sale is very easy. It makes absolutely no sense hiring someone else to do it for you.
 
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Hi, wise tactic for preventing the spam and the phishing emails.
Regarding domain ownership verification, you can easily solve it by setting mail forwarding from the "official" to "personal" email, and than responding / sending auth codes from the first.
 
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If he was any good he would be spending his time on his own domain portfolio.

Besides, listing domains for sale is very easy. It makes absolutely no sense hiring someone else to do it for you.
You have a point on the first statement.

I hired him not for the task of singning up and listing, but because I wanted to know which were those 8 marketplaces he was talking about, for the appraisal and for the sales pitch (description) of each domain.
 
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You have a point on the first statement.

I hired him not for the task of singning up and listing, but because I wanted to know which were those 8 marketplaces he was talking about, for the appraisal and for the sales pitch (description) of each domain.
Writing descriptions and designing logos are things that beginners tend to do (I did as well). Unfortunately, that is almost entirely wasted effort.

Instead, list your domains for sale on Afternic (with a BIN) and Sedo, and point the nameservers to Afternic. That's it. That is all you need. Good domains will sell themselves. True story.
 
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If you would be concerned about security, you wouldn't hire anyone to create accounts for you anywhere. Never. Period.
 
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You have a point on the first statement.

I hired him not for the task of singning up and listing, but because I wanted to know which were those 8 marketplaces he was talking about, for the appraisal and for the sales pitch (description) of each domain.

The Fiverr guy will just use ChatGPT and some algorithmic appraisal tool (worthless in principle).
 
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Money spent wrongly (however, nothing wrong with it in reality, since we all have been there one way or another). Next time ask Chat Gpt about the platforms. Here - I lubricated it for you:
  1. GoDaddy Auctions: A popular platform for buying and selling domain names, offering a wide audience and various tools to help sellers get the best price.
  2. Sedo: One of the leading marketplaces for domain trading, Sedo offers a range of services including auctions, direct sales, and brokerage services.
  3. Flippa: While known for selling online businesses, Flippa also has a section dedicated to domain sales. It's particularly good for premium domains.
  4. Afternic: A GoDaddy company, Afternic offers a network that allows domains to be listed and sold across multiple platforms, increasing visibility.
  5. NameCheap Marketplace: NameCheap's marketplace allows users to list their domains directly for sale. It's integrated with their registration and hosting services.
  6. eBay: While not a specialized domain marketplace, eBay's vast reach can make it a good place to list unique or highly sought-after domains.
  7. SnapNames: Specializing in domain auction services, SnapNames offers access to expired and deleting domain names, in addition to standard domain auctions.
  8. NamePros: An online community that includes a marketplace for buying and selling domain names. It's a good place for networking with other domainers.
  9. Dan.com: Known for its seamless transaction process, Dan.com focuses on making buying and selling domains as easy as possible, with a focus on security and user experience.
  10. DomainNameSales: A platform that combines brokerage services with self-listing options, allowing sellers to negotiate directly with buyers or enlist the help of professional brokers.

Truth is - just go to Afternic and Sedo, with your own landing page either with one of registrars (Dynadot, for example), or point to Afternic (or Sedo). Rest in the list either not worth attention or gets overlapped by one of the above mentioned.
There are also some more specific marketplaces, like 4chan, but as a newbie I wouldn't go there.

Write descriptions with ChatGpt and do registration yourself.

Any questions - open a new thread here on NamePros.

Case solved. :xf.smile:
 
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All right ppl. This was a very enlightening thread for me, so I thank you all for your inputs 🙏
 
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Also, STOP spending money on domains or ANY domain-related expenses for now.

Focus on building your knowledge. Namepros is a good place for that. Look for threads created by @Bob Hawkes and read them.
 
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Chat Gpt about the platforms. Here - I lubricated it for you:
Thanks for the instructive answer with a great list. I also agree that, most of the time, if you list at the big 3, and possibly your registrar marketplace, that covers it.

I would add if, and only if, you have names of the brandable type (particularly made-up and creative merges and spelling) one should also consider the brandable marketplaces, like SH, BB, BPa, etc.

Also, since Sav and Dynadot marketplaces allow listing from outside that registrar, they may warrant consideration.

As to the original question, I would echo what others say in that it is probably best to set a trajectory of learning to do things oneself, rather than pay for services to do things like marketplace listing. Once you have done a few, any of the marketplaces are fast and easy to list on.

-Bob
 
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I hired a domainer (with a good number of positive reviews) on Fiverr to help me create accounts in my name on different domain-selling platforms, like Dan, Squadhelp, Dynadot and so on.
Domain selling is a slow business, even with those with top super premium domain names — so the time you take setting up those marketplace accounts, is going to be an important part of your own learning process. Which means, you should create those accounts yourself.

What worries me somehow is that he also asks "The email you provided above, is it the same email you used to buy the domain names? if not, Please share the email through which you bought the domain names."
The marketplaces have no way of knowing which email address you've used to register those domain names, unless you've used the same email in the WHOIS record and the WHOIS record is open (i.e. without whois privacy). But if that is the case, then anyone can see it. So asking you that email address shows that either the freelancer doesn't know enough about these things, or he has malicious intents!

The thing is, for security reasons, I have one exclusive email address for my domain portfolio, which I don't ever use for anything else, and I explained that to him.
If you use strong password and two factor authentication, then knowing the email is not really that big of a security issue. However, as I said before, there's no valid reason why he should ask that information.

Have any of you ever needed to do an owner verification on those platforms that needed to enter the email address used to register the domain?
Never.

Do you find it risky to share that information?
Not particularly, no.

However, creating those accounts by someone else is 100% risky. Someone with bad intent can actually sell your domains and take all the money if he wants and there's nothing you can do about it.

So I suggest you either don't take that service or triple check those created accounts thoroughly (if the account creation is already done).
 
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As far as I know, different websites where you can sell domain names have their own ways of checking if you really own the domain you're trying to sell. A common method is adding a special text record (TXT) to your domain's settings. But, some places might also ask you to confirm through the email linked to your domain. This doesn't apply to every website, though; it varies. If you're worried about this, it's a good idea to look up the rules for each website you're interested in, like Dan, Squadhelp, or Dynadot, to see what they require. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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Hello ppl. I have a question. Two questions actually:

I hired a domainer (with a good number of positive reviews) on Fiverr to help me create accounts in my name on different domain-selling platforms, like Dan, Squadhelp, Dynadot and so on.

Of course, to do that he requires some sensitive information, such as my name, address, phone, email, etc.

I anticipated he was going to ask that kind of personal stuff before hiring him, and I was kind of OK about it.

What worries me somehow is that he also asks "The email you provided above, is it the same email you used to buy the domain names? if not, Please share the email through which you bought the domain names."

The thing is, for security reasons, I have one exclusive email address for my domain portfolio, which I don't ever use for anything else, and I explained that to him.

To which he replied "It might make some problems in the owner verification. I have faced some issues in the past if the ownership's mail and listing mails are different."

In my experience, the ownership verification is usually made by adding a TXT record with a string given by the platform, or something like that.

So, my two questions are:

- Have any of you ever needed to do an owner verification on those platforms that needed to enter the email address used to register the domain?

- Do you find it risky to share that information?

I'd appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks for reading.

@Jose A - I hate to break it to you, but you're not going learn much about this business if you're hiring someone else to do the work for you.

You should have security concerns, because this is what is referred to as a recipe for disaster.

Just sayin.'
 
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