NameSilo

HUGE DOMAINS SNIPING GODADDY CLOSEOUTS

Located in Domain Marketplace Reviews started by wwwweb, May 6, 2019.

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  1. DomainBanana

    DomainBanana Established Member

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    GD has shown it can't be trusted to self-regulate. We need a higher authority.
     
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  2. DomainVP

    DomainVP Domain Expert VIP

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    Let’s be real... have you seen most of these closeouts ::poop:: people don’t bid on them for a reason.

    Other than the closeouts and the API bidding is the $10 backorder on almost all aged DNs that are 5L and less.

    The game is cooked boys. Focus on smart acquisitions.
     
  3. Recons.Com

    Recons.Com Top Contributor VIP

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    That is the point though. Before, you did not know. Now, the move is INSTANT. So, they can tune the bot to place the bid at the exact second and be the first, as they are in the same building, from what was discussed in the thread. And I don't believe in coincidences in things like this.
     
  4. kriss05

    kriss05 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Drop times are indeed not too randomized. It is pretty easy to estimate at which time intervals the probability of domain to hit closeout is much higher than average one.

    Those who use web interface should take it into account, as it seems that the number of allowed refreshes/minute is less than number of allowed API calls/minute.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  5. meslam479

    meslam479 Established Member

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    For sure and it get worse when a few users refresh page at the same time, you will notice a huge delay in contrast to API users.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  6. nivadriver

    nivadriver Established Member

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    They tend to get the ones with an older reg date. They're not good at futurecasting. Heck, I don't know how good I am, but they don't dabble much in the trends I am working in the closeouts.
     
  7. nivadriver

    nivadriver Established Member

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    Don't have those numbers ATM, but I buy 90-95% closeouts. Of the names I bid on and lose, HD wins over 50%. I only very rarely buy a name for over 100 bucks at GD these days because of my aversion to the HD whale. I have a sense for where he is (almost everywhere) but there seem to be niches that do not interest the whale.
     
  8. wwwweb

    wwwweb Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Ok, so movie rights sold, make a noise and the huge domains bot will devour you. Not even a mouse click is safe.

    9AFA4C8E-2EDB-4A29-961D-0381DCCFE49C.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  9. slobizman

    slobizman Established Member ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I thought I'd look back at the domains I was outbid on over the last couple weeks. Just about every single one has Huge Domains in there bidding, and mostly winning. Often it is just me and them as the only two bidders. They seem to like the names I like (and others don't), which makes it really a pisser for me.

    The fact that there aren't more bidders in the auctions and aren't more others outbidding Huge Domains, tells me the domain market is WEAK. At this point, unless I really, really want a name and outbid HD, I'm just waiting for the ones that I like and they miss, and picking them up for $5 - $11.

    Let HD pay millions or tens of millions each year on the names. They'll be left holding the bag and the domain investment business gets slower and slower.
     
  10. slobizman

    slobizman Established Member ★★★★★★★★★★

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    This is interesting: I made an embarrassing mistake today. I bought futurenglish.com. I didn't notice that the name is missing a second E. Damn it. $127 wasted.

    But here's what's interesting. Huge Domains was the other bidder that ran the name up to this level, with their one and only bid at $124. Why would a sophisticated bot not notice that this name is not made up of two whole words? What made HD buy it? Was it an algorithm? Was it a human who made the same mistake as me? Obviously it's worth anything. Very strange.
     
  11. DomainBanana

    DomainBanana Established Member

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    HD usually doesn't make mistakes. Their algorithms assigned it value for a reason.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  12. Samer

    Samer Top Contributor VIP

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    Who would you want to play, Joe Styler You?

    They need make a domain movie :)

    Samer
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  13. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Or, to be more specific, they likely placed a bid with some reason. Auto-valuation might not be too relevant...
     
  14. ArielT

    ArielT Top Contributor VIP

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    Does HD participate in user auction or only in Exp?
     
  15. Samer

    Samer Top Contributor VIP

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    huh? i thought both.

    i avoid the place altogether, unless closeouts

    @Joe Styler and GD refuse to change this...

    Samer
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  16. AdamFL

    AdamFL Established Member

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    Why they should change anything if it's making them money. My question is these practices are legal? it seems like it's not a fair auctions/competition.
     
  17. wwwweb

    wwwweb Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Both, user auctions are more complex, they could zone in on you if you the only one making a single bid in the last minute, and put a proxy with $1xx price, forcing you to pay almost $200, or let i it go.

    The closeouts you have no chance, because a bot can snipe the auction the milli second it goes live at $11, you wouldn’t even be able to react by the time it’s already in their cart.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  18. DomainBanana

    DomainBanana Established Member

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    Exactly -- this is why we have to stop petitioning GD and start petitioning regulatory agencies.
     
  19. D Haynes

    D Haynes Top Contributor VIP

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    Because other users (us here) are doing the work for them. They don't need much of an algorithm when others are doing the looking for them. All they need to do is query the API for names that have had a bid on them, then they assume it has a value. So when you make a mistake, they make a mistake.
     
  20. Mister Funsky

    Mister Funsky Top Contributor VIP

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    I am so excited...think I have finally cracked some of 'tech' behind the daddy huggy program...testing it now.
     
  21. DomainVP

    DomainVP Domain Expert VIP

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    Clarification if you please...
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2020 at 8:18 PM
  22. Mister Funsky

    Mister Funsky Top Contributor VIP

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    Okay...we all know what is happening with respect to the auction vs bidding vs closeout process where no one can get a name once it has no bids (unofficially that is) due to huggy having access to the auction closeout process (I and several others used several computers over a period of time to test different methods of bidding).

    Explained well here: https://www.namepros.com/threads/huge-domains-sniping-godaddy-closeouts.1135689/page-23#post-7637159

    There is a mathematical ratio (algorithms if you prefer) to the buying/bidding process and it has been bugging me for a while. It seems the highest bid amount reached, once someone other than huggy started/triggered bidding, has a cap based on a value determined within their system (I don't believe there is any human oversight until/unless a certain level of bidding is reached). Tons of data out there and it is not that hard based on prior auction closings what the range is for 'ordinary' names.

    So (still crunching data so still speculating alot) it is clear there is some advantage, either provided within the auction process or there is a server, operating a really well built program, doing the bidding within immediate proximity to the auction origination (server proximity is the only answer if a 'x' second lead time is not being allowed).

    There is a clear point at which the huggy system will bail on bidding unless a human intervenes. I feel the operation is so large and their business model does not require this happen alot. They know that they can pay xx, xxx for a name and get low to mid xxxx for it in time...volume speaks volumes here.

    I tested many auctions today (at risk of great expense to myself) to see how/when the ceiling would pop...gladly the only names I broke through on I can move without too much hold time (a couple gems) at a small profit.

    It is necessary to make my motives clear here...I am a big fan and also quite jealous of huggy and the empire as far as their portfolio and sales operation works. They are an important part of holding domain name volume which helps keep pricing for all of us higher that it would be. What leaves a bitter, metallic taste in my mouth is that the playing field may not be level...ESPECIALLY when it comes to the period between auction and closeout status.

    Much of this info has been mentioned before in this and other threads but had to test it all for myself. Man, my head hurts and my fingers a little numb from the activity...have to read for a while!

    ADD/EDIT: I just now started reading from where I from last stopped reading and I see the API information...that would explain the access allowed by a 'volume' buyer. Having dealt with the day trade trick of renting offices by the exchange to trade on percentages, I like the (conspiracy theory) idea of a server stack nearby! :xf.smile:
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2020 at 9:41 PM
  23. wwwweb

    wwwweb Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    So how much did you end up costing them today, 4, or 5 figures?
     
  24. Mister Funsky

    Mister Funsky Top Contributor VIP

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    :xf.smile: My goal wasn't to cost them money but to see if my insane excel work had taken me in the right direction...I guess my bidding caused a 4 figure change...nothing they will notice. :xf.grin:
     
  25. Recons.Com

    Recons.Com Top Contributor VIP

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    GD valuations trick many by assigning values to worthless names that are

    a) non-brandable misspell of a great name (there are brandable misspells and those are valuable of course. I almost bought GlobalEnterpise.com, for example. GD put value on it higher than on many of my nice pronounceable 4L.coms, for comparison.

    b) names that include a famous trademark. Not necessarily TM violation, but the only reason they are recognized as valuable is because of GD's faulty algorithm. For example, they have bunch of names on auctions/closeouts right now that are Top USA sports team + Bank.com Those worthless bs names are valued at top dollar. And then names that might include top company names also can get huge valuations. GD has to stop this practice of encouraging on potential TM infringements while profiting from it.
     

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