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information HSTF.com: Seller gets questioned about value, raises price

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Chase asserts to have built Hostifi.net—now Hostifi.com—into a SaaS services provider that has generated $7 million dollars in revenue. There are no references to the net profits, however it should be sufficient leftover to acquire HSTF.com for $12,000 dollars.
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
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I sometimes do that and not out of spite. Just that if I set the price years ago and now I receive an offer, it might bring to my attention that the asking price is quite low. I still let the buyer get the domain at that price of course, but if they are adamant that they won't or after the negotiations lapse, I just set the price I *now* deem appropriate and wait for another offer.
 
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BTW the data he's using in the table is all wrong. I think he copy-pasted it from namebio unaware that namebio garbles copied data for whatever reason (ok, I get the reason, but it's still bad). What is more, the data was useless for this particular purpose anyway, because most, if not all, of these sales were expired domains and d2d auctions, again courtesy of namebio mixing all the different data in one bag. I appreciate namebio as a domainer tool but in the end user's hands it tends to do more harm than good.
 
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To be fair I don't think hstf.com is particularly valuable. I don't even think it's worth $2,000. Think about the pronunciation alone, "haitch-ess-tee-eff dot com." Stick to hostifi.com, and if you really need to upgrade go for hostfi.com.
 
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The guy is clueless. CCCC.com made of great letters with great placement will easily command $700-2000 wholesale. The retail can be anywhere from $5k to 25k for 95% of those depending on the business model of an investor.

And, in fact, using it just as non-vowel shortener is probably a waste of a great name. I am sure there are enough of the proper acronym users to put a proper value on it. And example from the top of my head: A security company (Home Security Task Force)
 
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To be fair I don't think hstf.com is particularly valuable. I don't even think it's worth $2,000. Think about the pronunciation alone, "haitch-ess-tee-eff dot com." Stick to hostifi.com, and if you really need to upgrade go for hostfi.com.

Your inability to recognize the difference between the brands hostifi.com and hostfi.com is concrete grounds to disregard your opinion on this issue.
 
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Your inability to recognize the difference between the brands hostifi.com and hostfi.com is concrete grounds to disregard your opinion on this issue.
It's not that I was unable to differentiate between two brands. I was suggesting a rebranding. Why? Because hostifi sounds like hostify, hostfi on the other hand is a bit more manageable because it sounds a bit like wi-fi. Now it's not perfect by any stretch of the imagination. Preferably he'd get something like host[word].com or [word]host.com.

Furthermore, I presented an argument. Hstf.com is terrible for legibility and memorability. So it's not a matter of opinion.
 
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Hstf.com is terrible for legibility and memorability.
I thought the buyer said they wanted the domain for naming their servers, for internal use. It was not meant for rebranding purposes.
 
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The guy is clueless. CCCC.com made of great letters with great placement will easily command $700-2000 wholesale. The retail can be anywhere from $5k to 25k for 95% of those depending on the business model of an investor.
I'd correct you, but you're are being purposely vague here with "great letters with great placement." There are plenty of LLLL.com that are listed for $200 on Sedo and still don't sell.

1713766545301.png


Granted, hstf.com has more desirable letters, but you'd not get $250 for it wholesale here.

And, in fact, using it just as non-vowel shortener is probably a waste of a great name. I am sure there are enough of the proper acronym users to put a proper value on it. And example from the top of my head: A security company (Home Security Task Force)
Home Security Task Force doesn't even seem like a company name.

But going back to CCCC.com domains. Here are the latest sales.

1713766742051.png


Note how none of them even break into the four figures.

I thought that the buyer said he wanted the domain for naming their servers, for internal use. It was not meant for rebranding purposes.
Then there's no point in spending any money on it. Just hand-reg hstifi.com.
 
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It's not that I was unable to differentiate between two brands. I was suggesting a rebranding. Why? Because hostifi sounds like hostify, hostfi on the other hand is a bit more manageable because it sounds a bit like wi-fi. Now it's not perfect by any stretch of the imagination. Preferably he'd get something like host[word].com or [word]host.com.

Hostifi makes perfect sense, because his business is built on Ubiquiti UniFi product line.
Hostfi sounds like something related to finance, imo.
 
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Hostifi makes perfect sense, because their business is built on Ubiquiti UniFi product line.
Hostfi sounds like something related to finance, imo.
Finance is usually denoted fin, e.g. fintech, but fitech could work too I suppose.

The point was Host is a word, Hosti isn't. Uni on the other hand is a common abbreviation for universal, and unifi sounds a bit like unify.

So I stand by that HostFi would work better as a brand. That said, if it's just for an internal server (that clients won't interact with) then he shouldn't even be spending money on the aftermarket. Because it's 100% vanity and 0% strategy.
 
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Finance is usually denoted fin, e.g. fintech, but fitech could work too I suppose.

The point was Host is a word, Hosti isn't. Uni on the other hand is a common abbreviation for universal, and unifi sounds a bit like unify.

So I stand by that HostFi would work better as a brand. That said, if it's just for an internal server (that clients won't interact with) then he shouldn't even be spending money on a domain. Because it's 100% vanity and 0% strategy.

https://www.ycombinator.com/companies/hostfi
https://hostfi.io/
 
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The point was about what word+fi denotes, not about what's taken.
 
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I'd correct you, but you're are being purposely vague here with "great letters with great placement." There are plenty of LLLL.com that are listed for $200 on Sedo and still don't sell.

Show attachment 255849

Granted, hstf.com has more desirable letters, but you'd not get $250 for it wholesale here.


Home Security Task Force doesn't even seem like a company name.

But going back to CCCC.com domains. Here are the latest sales.

Show attachment 255850

Note how none of them even break into the four figures.


Then there's no point in spending any money on it. Just hand-reg hstifi.com.

I cannot help you if you can't see much of a difference between hstf and duxj.

For the likes of the former I regularly pay 500$ to 1000$ wholesale. For the latter, I personally won't pay a dime although there are takers for any 4l at around $100.
 
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I cannot help you if you can't see much of a difference between hstf and duxj.
No, I understand that certain letters like j are undesirable. But it's still important to touch ground on what these domains actually sell for. You can of course go through the list on Sedo to see if there's anything you like. I'm sure you can find something like hstf.com for under $250.

For the likes of the former I regularly pay 500$ to 1000$ wholesale.
Then you pay more in wholesale than what they typically sell for.

For the latter, I personally won't pay a dime although there are takers for any 4l at around $100.
The ones I've seen offer $50 for any LLLL.com. You get to $100 once you've filtered out a couple of undesirable letters.

But it's a stupid category to begin with because it's based off misconceptions about the market for Chinese four pin initial domains.

Holy Shit That's Funny.
Okay,
The problem is that it kind of defeats the point.
 
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You sound like a first year philosophy student.
I'm just stating the obvious.

If Fi is an abbreviation for terms and phrases other than finance, then Fi doesn't necessarily connote finance, now does it? Even HostiFi capitalizes the Fi as well.

1713772048594.png
 
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I'm sure you can find something like hstf.com for under $250.
Yeah, if you just grab any 4 letter .com domain you can find, you may find someone who sells you (a quite unattractive, ugly 4 letter domain) for ... $250-

But that is not the case here.

Buyer searched for this exact domain name, and that is a whole different game.

Espec, since he wanted a 4 letter domain by his own choice.

He could have searched for an 8 letter domain, if he wanted to... but he didn't ;)
 
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I'm just stating the obvious.

If Fi is an abbreviation for terms and phrases other than finance, then Fi doesn't necessarily connote finance, now does it? Even HostiFi capitalizes the Fi as well.

Show attachment 255854

Straw man.
End of thread for me.
 
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No, you can't.
There are 98 domains of this type listed on Sedo for $250 or less. Bump that up to $500 (your minimum) and you've got 1,049. I'm sure you'd find something if you believed what you were saying.

And I'm only looking at the ones with a buy-it-now option.

But this isn't something we need to debate because I listed the most recent sales. Most of the four letter-soup .com sell for three figures (and those are the ones desirable enough to sell).

Straw man.
It's not. You rephrased your argument to "Fi sometimes connotes finance" which makes it a moot point.

You might as well argue that "Fi sometimes stand for Finland."
 
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