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CAPPED: THE MATURITY IN DOMAIN INVESTING

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😩 The year is 2024 and many domainers still find it practically impossible to openly acknowledge other TLD extensions have relevance. Why does this matter? Well, it speaks to the industry’s maturity being capped. At least from a domain investor standpoint. This isn’t to suggest by any means that domainers should view every extension as having the same value as their beloved .com. It’s merely to say it’s time to grow up and acknowledge there’s room for more than .com in the online world of website addressing and digital identity. Especially for individual addressing needs/preferences.

🤔 In the case of individual addressing needs/preferences, it’s rather concerning that some domainers would see a domain like ‘bob.hawkes’ and double-down on the notion it has no relevance in comparison to ‘bobhawkes.com’. (Would love your thoughts on which is better @bobhawkes.) Sheesh. Where’s the logic in that? Especially if shorter is “better”. An exact-match name clearly has relevance; and alternative TLDs make this naming approach possible. Ask a major web player like YouTube who actively employs YouTu.be. This isn’t a matter of preferring or valuing all extensions. It’s a matter of recognizing life and language isn’t all ‘commercial’ and ‘.com’.

😤 Sure, this thread will likely be moved to another section of the forum; and will likely jog unsavory feelings in the minds and hearts of those domainers who’d downvote it into oblivion if they could. Yet, the relevant point about other extensions having relevance stands. There’s not a single domainer that has gone the distance of boycotting ICANN for approving TLDs; or went on a crusade to rid the world of every word and acronym except commercial and .com. It’s time to wake up and recognize we don’t have to like or value what has even the slightest bit of relevance. We should merely acknowledge it has a place. Easy right? For most of us old-school domainers, probably not.
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
While i somewhat agree to your point,

Sometimes domainers or brokers don't have the choice when all the client wants is a .com brand name?

Believe me i own a bunch of other TLDs including latest .ing and i would love nothing more then for someone to come and grab them...

But as i said... The relevance of .com is there to stay whether we like it or not.

But yeah... There is definitely some need to move on from .com but for that we already have some acceptance or .io and . app ??

So all in all i guess it's gonna tale a long time and patience.

But i hope when it happens i am there to see it. 🙂

-Krishnal
 
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I don't understand threads like this...

If you truly believe in new gTLDs then who cares what domainers think? Just keep buying them at low prices and selling them at high prices and stop trying to invite competition.

Remember, domain investors do not create the market, they react to it, so if you think new gTLDs are the future then it doesn't matter what they think.
 
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I don't understand threads like this...

If you truly believe in new gTLDs then who cares what domainers think? Just keep buying them at low prices and selling them at high prices and stop trying to invite competition.

Remember, domain investors do not create the market, they react to it, so if you think new gTLDs are the future then it doesn't matter what they think.
🧠 “Threads like this” are meant to facilitate consideration of domaining beyond the monetary benefit it provides domainers. Anyone interested in seeing beyond the scope of solely buying and selling names can see ‘shortsighted domaining and tribalism stand to hurt the next phase of the industry’. Especially as it relates to any efforts to help the masses see they have a multitude of naming options.

🙅‍♂️ Tomorrow’s domain industry doesn’t need to be steered by a culture of self-serving individuals broadcasting to families and children that .com is the only extension with any relevance. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see the domain landscape has evolved beyond the 90s - a time where a handful of lone enthusiasts snagged names and made considerable sums selling later on.

🗣 We’re entering a new era that calls for a more inclusive internet experience. One where more than commercial businesses need to be identified. That’s what this thread was meant to indirectly address. Pardon the foresight and consideration of how a stagnant domain culture stands to hurt THE PEOPLE.
 
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I go where demand is. There is simply limited end user demand when it comes to most new extensions.

There is also a lack of appealing opportunities as many top combos are registry reserved.

Brad
 
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🤔 In the case of individual addressing needs/preferences, it’s rather concerning that some domainers would see a domain like ‘bob.hawkes’ and double-down on the notion it has no relevance in comparison to ‘bobhawkes.com’. (Would love your thoughts on which is better @bobhawkes.) Sheesh. Where’s the logic in that? Especially if shorter is “better”. An exact-match name clearly has relevance; and alternative TLDs make this naming approach possible. Ask a major web player like YouTube who actively employs YouTu.be. This isn’t a matter of preferring or valuing all extensions. It’s a matter of recognizing life and language isn’t all ‘commercial’ and ‘.com’.
In this case, BobHawkes.com is clearly better. Every internet user will recognize that as a domain.

My guess is not that many people would even realize Bob.Hawkes is a domain name.

Not to mention, that isn't even available anyway.

A more realistic example would be like what is better Bob.xyz (or similar) for a massive premium, or BobHawkes.com.

For personal branding, there is no replacement for your name in .COM.

Brad
 
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I don't understand threads like this...

If you truly believe in new gTLDs then who cares what domainers think? Just keep buying them at low prices and selling them at high prices and stop trying to invite competition.

Remember, domain investors do not create the market, they react to it, so if you think new gTLDs are the future then it doesn't matter what they think.
Yeah, end users need to be convinced how great new extensions are.

You need a primary market to have a secondary market. Most new extensions don't have much of a primary market.

Brad
 
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I go where demand is. There is simply limited end user demand when it comes to most new extensions.

There is also a lack of appealing opportunities as many top combos are registry reserved.

Brad
Understood. As your comment reiterates, not everyone sees domaining and digital identity for how they can, and ultimately should, serve the diverse global population. This includes children and families who now contribute value to the online world domain names exist within.
 
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In this case, BobHawkes.com is clearly better. Every internet user will recognize that as a domain.

My guess is not that many people would even realize Bob.Hawkes is a domain name.

Not to mention, that isn't even available anyway.

A more realistic example would be like what is better Bob.xyz (or similar) for a massive premium, or BobHawkes.com.

For personal branding, there is no replacement for your name in .COM.

Brad
I’d have to respectfully degree. There’s no replacement for one’s name without .com. Pardon my belief that ‘Brad Mugford’ (the name given at birth I assume) has far more intrinsic value than BradMugford.com. Unless one looks to solely have a “commercial” existence, .com can cap one’s personal brand potential. Especially if they seek to truly be distinct. I digress though. Whatever works for one person and business doesn’t always work for another. I assume we can agree on that.
 
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I’d have to respectfully degree. There’s no replacement for one’s name without .com. Pardon my belief that ‘Brad Mugford’ (the name given at birth I assume) has far more intrinsic value than BradMugford.com. Unless one looks to solely have a “commercial” existence, .com can cap one’s personal brand potential. Especially if they seek to truly be distinct. I digress though. Whatever works for one person and business doesn’t always work for another. I assume we can agree on that.
You can stick .COM at the end of any term and it is instantly recognized as a domain name.

You stick a dot between words and it often isn't.

I would not want a domain that creates confusion that you have to constantly explain.

If you want to swim upstream, more power to you.

I also deal in more extensions than just .COM, but the reality is that .COM is dominant because of actual recognition and usage.

It has nothing to do with domain investors. The demand is end user driven.

Brad
 
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You can stick .COM at the end of any term and it is instantly recognized as a domain name.

You stick a dot between words and it often isn't.

I would not want a domain that creates confusion that you have to constantly explain.

If you want to swim upstream, more power to you.

I also deal in more extensions than just .COM, but the reality is that .COM is dominant because of actual recognition and usage.

It has nothing to do with domain investors. The demand is end user driven.

Brad
The need to explain is often the result of a lack of education. Let's be honest, the early pack of domain investors cared less about educating the masses. Hence, their devotion to .com and why the average person couldn't tell you what a domain name is. The internet has been a commercial sandbox for too long. Now, it's evolving into a social sandbox. One where diverse language and expression will soon reign supreme. .Com will always have a relevance; but it won't have sole relevance in the broader scope of how people CHOOSE to identify themselves.
 
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The need to explain is often the result of a lack of education. Let's be honest, the early pack of domain investors cared less about educating the masses. Hence, their devotion to .com and why the average person couldn't tell you what a domain name is. The internet has been a commercial sandbox for too long. Now, it's evolving into a social sandbox. One where diverse language and expression will soon reign supreme. .Com will always have a relevance; but it won't have sole relevance in the broader scope of how people CHOOSE to identify themselves.
Well, blame the registries. They are the ones failing to properly promote their products.

If consumers need to be educated, the burden is on them.

Many just have terrible business models.

It's kind of a chicken and egg scenario. They don't have enough income to justify advertising, but without that advertising there isn't much natural demand.

Brad
 
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It depends on where you are located and who you are targeting. Dot com is king in just a minor part of the World.

That being said... Like @bmugford stated, go where the money is at.

UK companies couldn't care less about owning the .com. there is a vibrant market for .co.uk however.

New TLDs thouh... Little success, hardly anything noticeable besides outlier sales. You gotta read between the lines. Gotta move away from what's best/king/golden. Gotta look for opportunity, even if you wholeheartedly dislike the extension (like, for instance, xyz).
 
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