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DynaDot automated appraisals really high vs all of the others out there — why?

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Molly

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Hi guys. I get that automated appraisals are unreliable, and so I generally compare the estimations from 3-5 different sites & come to my own conclusions.

That said, DynaDot’s appraisals seem ridiculously high! It’s claiming at least 5 digit ($xx,xxx) estimates for several of my domains, and nothing else has come anywhere near that.

Is it a ruse of some sort?
Have others tried it and have you noticed it’s always really high, or is it my lucky day? Thanks!
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
I typically have two main issues with all appraisal systems:

1. I don't understand how they work.
2. I do understand how they work.

Here Dynadot seems to have trained an AI bot to evaluate domains based on certain parameters. However, the flaws in their system are the size of black holes. For example, 80% of hyphenated domains are higher in value (and by much!), than their non-hyphenated brothers. For example, "Drone-Racing" is valued at $10670, while "DroneRacing" is only valued at $6,650.

Agree with the opinion to never rely on any online appraisal, unless you decide to create your own and fully understand what's behind.

These days, you don't trust anyone online. But you can definitely trust me through, no doubt about it.
(y):xf.grin::xf.cool:
drone-racing is simple to read.

droneracing looks like a run-on sentence.

Hyphenated domains may be undervalued, fewer sales, and considered a definite no. However some phrases are grammatically correct when using a hyphen.
 
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I have the same viewpoint on estibot. All of my domains on estibot are $100 or less. So If one appraisal system seems favorable, it balances out the systems that undervalues a domain name.


If Zillow appraised your house higher than you expected would that be a problem?
 
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So here are appraisals for one of my names:

Estibot: <$100
PC Domains: $197
Graen: $1,809
GoDaddy $1,812
Brandpa: $2,995
HumbleWorth: $4,080

Something is wrong with Dynadot, wasn't able to access their appraisal tool. But it doesn't matter, as you can see the point. How is this helpful? Should I price it based on the first 2 and price it less than $200? Or should I listen to the highest 2 and price it mid $3k? Maybe price in the middle at $1,800?

Everyone has given you good advice - past sales and current listed prices for similar names (if there are similar names). In addition to NameBio check dnpric.es And check Atom for current listing prices. You'll quickly get a sense of where you should price. Appraisals are the last place to look (although you can glance at them). If all 6 above showed <$200, I'd be very wary of the name I've chosen to invest in (although I still may like it). If all 6 were over $2k - perhaps I'd be more impressed with my name. But for my portfolio (and yours) that is not going to happen.
 
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Otherwise, which end of the spectrum do you think is most realistic in these examples?
None of them are of any use whatsoever.

This becomes evident when you understand what parameters they use and how they weigh them. For example, EstiBot primarily considers search volume (exact and broad) for words and phrases when finding related sales.

Knowing this, I can easily find two domains (daily search limit) where EstiBot's appraisals are higher than DynaDot's.
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But neither of these are anywhere close to the mark. For reference, clockwork.xyz sold for $80,000.

1718684414847.png


Granted, it was a Sweatha sale, but still. Most people would not pay 1% of what they'd pay for a .com for an alternative like .xyz. Now in this case I think it's closer to 10%, but you get the point.

The reason automated appraisals are worthless is because they don't consider the most important factors, primarily those relating to branding. Let's get back to clockwork.com. Clockwork makes an excellent brand. It's easy to remember and spell, it's extremely versatile, and it echoes functionality and a careful attention to detail.

Something like awful.com or foul.com is going to freak out DynaDot's appraisal service, because they're short words. But what end-user would want foul.com? It has negative connotations and is easily confused for fowl.com. I mean, imagine trying to promote a company called "Foul" at a business meeting. Even if it is a good company it leaves the impression that it is a joke.

The only appraisals that are worth a damn are those conducted by real people with notable experience and a comprehensive grasp of the market.
 
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drone-racing is simple to read.

droneracing looks like a run-on sentence.

Hyphenated domains may be undervalued, fewer sales, and considered a definite no. However some phrases are grammatically correct when using a hyphen.

Anything with hyphens is easy to read, because you separate two words. However the data on past sales is very clear that almost any two word combinations sell better without hyphen (with some exception - mainly where to use hyphen is grammatically correct).

And with Dynadot appraisal the situation is very opposite - almost every hyphen is estimated much higher, which is simply not correct.
 
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Anything with hyphens is easy to read, because you separate two words. However the data on past sales is very clear that almost any two word combinations sell better without hyphen (with some exception - mainly where to use hyphen is grammatically correct).

And with Dynadot appraisal the situation is very opposite - almost every hyphen is estimated much higher, which is simply not correct.
There's a good reason for this. Hyphenated domains are more difficult to convey verbally, e.g. "go to drone racing dot com," vs "go to drone hyphen racing dot com." It's just so easy to mishear or misinterpret.

Furthermore, due to their lack of use, hyphenated domains may come across as less legitimate in a similar vein to how a .net may come across as less legitimate (when compared to a .com), hence they're less desirable and consequently less valuable.

Case in point: The site is called namepros.com (not name-pros.com), its registrar is dynadot.com (not dyna-dot.com), and its DNS are on cloudflare.com (not cloud-flare.com).

If you want to make it more legible in writing you can just capitalize the letters, e.g. NamePros.com, and the problem is solved.
 
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There's a good reason for this. Hyphenated domains are more difficult to convey verbally, e.g. "go to drone racing dot com," vs "go to drone hyphen racing dot com." It's just so easy to mishear or misinterpret.

Furthermore, due to their lack of use, hyphenated domains may come across as less legitimate in a similar vein to how a .net may come across as less legitimate (when compared to a .com), hence they're less desirable and consequently less valuable.

Case in point: The site is called namepros.com (not name-pros.com), its registrar is dynadot.com (not dyna-dot.com), and its DNS are on cloudflare.com (not cloud-flare.com).

If you want to make it more legible in writing you can just capitalize the letters, e.g. NamePros.com, and the problem is solved.

I don't really know why you need to explain me this ) My post was a reply to the message, where someone said that ''drone-racing'' is easier to read than ''droneracing'', and I said that ANYTHING with hyphens are easier to read, BUT... and then said exactly what you are saying.

The original post was about Dynadot appraisal service and my point there was to show that most of their hyphenated names appraised higher, which just can't be true (at least historical sales data contradicts it completely).
 
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It was to emphasize the point that hyphenated domains aren't undervalued. Though I probably should've quoted the other guy. Well, it's too late to edit the post anyhow.
 
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So here are appraisals for one of my names:

Estibot: <$100
PC Domains: $197
Graen: $1,809
GoDaddy $1,812
Brandpa: $2,995
HumbleWorth: $4,080
Thanks
I bookmarked PC Domains (again). I lost the link during a upgrade.
PC Domains seems to recognize all gTLD's and ccTLD's.

If Namesworth recognized all extensions and subdomains, I might consider getting an upgraded account.

I mostly use Brandpa for brandable domains. I'll see how it handles a generic domain name instead of a portmanteau.
 
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If Namesworth recognized all extensions and subdomains, I might consider getting an upgraded account.

I’m glad you mentioned Nameworth. I’ve only gotten a few appraisals there, and most are a lot higher than I’m pricing. The values aren’t as outrageous as Dynadot, but high nonetheless (IMO). Do you find Nameworth to be an ok guardrail when pricing?
 
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I’m glad you mentioned Nameworth. I’ve only gotten a few appraisals there, and most are a lot higher than I’m pricing. The values aren’t as outrageous as Dynadot, but high (IMO) nonetheless. Do you find Nameworth to be an ok guardrail when pricing?
Yes

Namesworth uses SEO as a major contributing factor in it's evaluations. That's more practical and current than strictly previous sales data. It also doesn't default to (LLL, LLLL, NNN, NNNN) being the greatest value. I have an 8 character domain that ranked Tier 2.
 
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In my years of domaining, I find automated appraisals to be more or less just a supplementary trait.
For domainers trying to sell a domain to a domainer - It may give you a very vague yet near to realistic value, divide by 10 or 100 but for end users, it holds 0 value.

Why I say that it has no effect for end users, its because an automated appraisal tool won't convince the end user to purchase that random English dictionary domain name for 5-8 figures.

Giving my own example, I won't buy Voice.com which was sold for $30m but Block.one did as they saw use & value in it. Max I'd pay for Voice.com would be $30000

But if you consider my own surname/last name, I would go up to $2m to acquire it (will do it later stage of life).

So you see these automated appraisals albeit garbage sometimes still it give some nudge in the right direction while pricing a domain (not for end-user)
 
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Thanks
I bookmarked PC Domains (again). I lost the link during a upgrade.
PC Domains seems to recognize all gTLD's and ccTLD's.

If Namesworth recognized all extensions and subdomains, I might consider getting an upgraded account.

I mostly use Brandpa for brandable domains. I'll see how it handles a generic domain name instead of a portmanteau.

Be aware PC Domains is like Estibot - they both do not handle brandables at all.
There is also DN Rater (although they cost money and I don't recommend paying for appraisals).

Here is an appraisal from all 9 appraisal sites I'm aware of for my name (Name Groove):

Dynadot: $10,411
NameWorth: $,9,450 (Tier 3)
GoDaddy: $1,651
Brandpa: $1,495
Graen: $1,090
HumbleWorth: $705
DN Rater: $599
PC Domains: $159
Estibot: $110
Average: $2,852

Not sure why anyone would pay for DN Rater - nothing about their appraisal stands out from the rest.

Interestingly, the average of all 9 sites shows a decent end user price and is in the range for what I think my name would sell for.
 
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an ok guardrail when pricing?
Hi

i think you are not going to make it, because you don't seem to be getting it
you keep asking about other app bs, instead of looking at the hand you're holding.

time to fold and reshuffle.

@inforg gave solid advice, read and heed, then move on


imo....
 
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Hi

i think you are not going to make it, because you don't seem to be getting it
you keep asking about other app bs, instead of looking at the hand you're holding.

time to fold and reshuffle.

@inforg gave solid advice, read and heed, then move on


imo....

Not sure what this is about. If you were just looking for someone to take a stab at, rock on! Hopefully it made you feel better about yourself.
 
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Hello, @Molly M.

Where I was born and brought up, and still live after so long, we have a saying to mean that something hitting you that doesn't kill you, in fact makes you stronger.

Regarding the subject of this thread, I am still a learner, but I would say that the most valuable insights you can get from NameWorth are the rationales for the pricing levels. Actual amounts can largely differ for each particular transaction, but what's worth learning is the evaluation method.

Excuse me for asking, but have you tried reading the "Professional Appraisals" section here on NamePros? It's another good source, in my opinion.
 
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Hello, @Molly M.

Where I was born and brought up, and still live after so long, we have a saying to mean that something hitting you that doesn't kill you, in fact makes you stronger.

Regarding the subject of this thread, I am still a learner, but I would say that the most valuable insights you can get from NameWorth are the rationales for the pricing levels. Actual amounts can largely differ for each particular transaction, but what's worth learning is the evaluation method.

Excuse me for asking, but have you tried reading the "Professional Appraisals" section here on NamePros? It's another good source, in my opinion.
Thanks, @MariaEl. I’ve read quite a bit on NP so far, but was there something specific in the appraisals section you think could help? I’m open to guidance & criticism, but not shortsighted stabs from regulars on the platform who think their shit doesn’t stink.

I’ve only been on the forum for a couple of weeks and am blown away by how comfortable some people feel being jerks to others who they know nothing about from halfway around the world.

Hopefully, this next example can further illustrate the source confusion around pricing. Please keep in mind that I’m not doing this in hopes of getting rich overnight. I’m doing this because I feel compelled to share a message [of hope], but I need to at least make enough to cover my annual renewals.

GDEstiBrandpaNameworthMy list price
easytoaccept.com509450185
hardtoaccept.com164509450245
invitehim.com25185705024502518
ipitts.com50503450950
stoppoking.com5205014500970
whoohw.com1247505012501247
 
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I get that automated appraisals are unreliable,

Not sure what this is about.
Hi

it's about your initial statement.

as, if you get it, then why?

some members trying to confirm, what you say you get, but then you want to "challenge" us too?

really... challenge yourself, before you wreck yourself.

imo...
 
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Thanks, @MariaEl. I’ve read quite a bit on NP so far, but was there something specific in the appraisals section you think could help? I’m open to guidance & criticism, but not shortsighted stabs from regulars on the platform who think their shit doesn’t stink.

I’ve only been on the forum for a couple of weeks and am blown away by how comfortable some people feel being jerks to others who they know nothing about from halfway around the world.

Hopefully, this next example can further illustrate the source confusion around pricing. Please keep in mind that I’m not doing this in hopes of getting rich overnight. I’m doing this because I feel compelled to share a message [of hope], but I need to at least make enough to cover my annual renewals.

GDEstiBrandpaNameworthMy list price
easytoaccept.com509450185
hardtoaccept.com164509450245
invitehim.com25185705024502518
ipitts.com50503450950
stoppoking.com5205014500970
whoohw.com1247505012501247
Thoughts? Thanks!
 
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Thoughts? Thanks!

I'm going to reply later (in a bit of a hurry with offline duties right now).

You have already made positive things happen here; by bringing about these questions and discussion, many of us can reflect and learn from what is posted (even from those wrongly worded, sometimes rude, replies).
 
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I’ve only been on the forum for a couple of weeks and am blown away by how comfortable some people feel being jerks to others who they know nothing about from halfway around the world.

Well, you have to understand that almost any question that a newbie asks has been discussed just a bit more than a thousand times, including appraisals of course. People who's been here for 3+ years do not use appraisal services (at least I'd say 90%) because a real, serious appraisal take very many different aspects into consideration: past sales, tld taken, trend words, sounding, uniqueness, creativity, gut feeling and many-many more at the same time.

Now, all automated appraisals are really using one or two aspects, that's it. I know it compliments you when the appraisal system says you can sell your name for 20000 or 2000 and you just registered it 1h ago out of the blue - this appraisal means nothing - that's what people are telling you, and it's true. When they say so but you keep insisting, some get irritated. Not saying it's right or wrong, it's just the way it is. One way or the other, but many will share their opinion of 20 or 15 years being a domainer, in one-two sentences, which costs a lot even if you do not agree.

Now, nothing wrong with playing with all of these estimations (everyone has been there) but do not try to find the guardrails - there are none. If you stick around, a year from now (in 2 for sure) you'll get it.

To throw my 2 cents in, maybe @Eric Lyon can give you an estimation of one of your names (whether publicly or in private) for you to have an idea of what professional appraisal really is, how and what factors counts and then compare to automated services you are referring to.
 
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Well, you have to understand that almost any question that a newbie asks has been discussed just a bit more than a thousand times, including appraisals of course. People who's been here for 3+ years do not use appraisal services (at least I'd say 90%) because a real, serious appraisal take very many different aspects into consideration: past sales, tld taken, trend words, sounding, uniqueness, creativity, gut feeling and many-many more at the same time.

Now, all automated appraisals are really using one or two aspects, that's it. I know it compliments you when the appraisal system says you can sell your name for 20000 or 2000 and you just registered it 1h ago out of the blue - this appraisal means nothing - that's what people are telling you, and it's true. When they say so but you keep insisting, some get irritated. Not saying it's right or wrong, it's just the way it is. One way or the other, but many will share their opinion of 20 or 15 years being a domainer, in one-two sentences, which costs a lot even if you do not agree.

Now, nothing wrong with playing with all of these estimations (everyone has been there) but do not try to find the guardrails - there are none. If you stick around, a year from now (in 2 for sure) you'll get it.

To throw my 2 cents in, maybe @Eric Lyon can give you an estimation of one of your names (whether publicly or in private) for you to have an idea of what professional appraisal really is, how and what factors counts and then compare to automated services you are referring to.
Thanks, @VadimK. I get it; I was just thrown off by the unexpected message I woke up to. I was mostly done with this chat, tbh, though I learned a lot.

I just don’t want people to assume I’m disillusioned and thinking this is a get rich quick scheme. Thank God, I have a successful-enough career. Rather, this is about sharing a message [of hope]; telling a story, so to speak. I just want to move domains quickly, and at least make enough to pay annual renewals & afford to continue playing the game.

And @Eric Lyon was kind enough to appraise one of my domains — super thorough. But even the domains of mine that an experienced domainer could probably sell for 4-5 digits, I’m usually still listing in the low hundreds. In my mind, I thought people seeing a domain that could sell for thousands at retail, listed at only 10-50% of that price, would mean faster sales.
 
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But even the domains of mine that an experienced domainer could probably sell for 4-5 digits, I’m usually still listing in the low hundreds. In my mind, I thought people seeing a domain that could sell for thousands at retail, listed at only 10-50% of that price, would mean faster sales.

It depends.

Wholesale buyers are a lot more savvy and have more names to choose from. So your “low hundreds” name is competing against all the other names we can buy in that range.

In many cases selling in the hundreds is just giving a big discount to a retail buyer who would have paid thousands.

But again, it depends. Names in hot markets like AI are more likely to sell cheap to another domain investor looking for a quick flip compared to less sexy names.
 
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I just want to move domains quickly, and at least make enough to pay annual renewals & afford to continue playing the game.

That's a wrong mindset. It's actually the same as thinking of the ''get rich quick'' scheme. You really should be thinking about it not as a side business, but as an investment. Like collecting paintings - the same thing. You are investing and ready to hold names for years. If you are lucky, you'll sell. But don't think about it. Don't ask yourself ''how do I sell faster?'', instead ask ''how do I get the best names possible?''. You can afford to hold 100-200 quality names without making money for annual renewals.

But even the domains of mine that an experienced domainer could probably sell for 4-5 digits, I’m usually still listing in the low hundreds. In my mind, I thought people seeing a domain that could sell for thousands at retail, listed at only 10-50% of that price, would mean faster sales.

Another mistake. You simply are not listing the same names as experienced domainer. And see - that's the problem with appraisal services - they kinda make you believe you are. And it's not the case.

Also, in domaining it doesn't work this way - ''I'll lower the price and sell faster''. You either have the end user who normally can pay low XXXX for the name he likes or you have a reseller where $100 is the ceiling. Nothing in between.
Sure people do sell names in mid XXX, but not because they lowered the price, but because it was a fair price at the moment at a time for their name. Or some trending, hot keywords where you got early and even other domainers might like it.
 
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