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Attention Grabbing Points in Your Email to End Users

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JamesCrew

Established Member
Impact
388
A quick question today for email outreach experts here:

What is/are the most "attention grabbing" point(s) you include in your primary email to end-users? In simple words, what do you guys and gals write in your email that you think can possibly attract them and make them realize about the potential of the domain you are offering for their business.

The reason I ask this is to learn how to trigger buyer's interest and secondly to get the best price out of them, even when I am reaching them first (and not like the other way around when buyer has contacted me first).

I am about to email few big corporations and I was hoping to first get some ideas from professionals here before I mess things up badly for meself (yup, wrote that intentionally, hehehe).
 
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Domain Lead Finder

Established Member
Impact
570
What are the domains? It depends on what type of domain name it is, and what type of argument you can use...
 

JamesCrew

Established Member
Impact
388
What are the domains? It depends on what type of domain name it is, and what type of argument you can use...

I have mostly two word brandables (no madeup words) and three word generic (keyword) domains.

The companies I am aiming to contact have a variety of businesses already running in the sector and I believe my domains would give them additional room to capture other similar markets they are already in. Of course, I just need to find a way to make them realize this point.

Hope it helps.
 

Domain Lead Finder

Established Member
Impact
570
If your domains are for example: poolcleaningmiami.com you could point out:

1) this domain name is easy to remember compared to for example "mikespoolcleaning.com"
2) it is good for billboards and radio ads, easier to remember than any other, for this specific service/area
3) it is the exact phrase people will google if they want that particular service in that particular area
4) even if they have multiple variations of this domain, with this domain they throw a "wider net"
5) the competition will not get it if they buy it
 

JamesCrew

Established Member
Impact
388
If your domains are for example: poolcleaningmiami.com you could point out:

1) this domain name is easy to remember compared to for example "mikespoolcleaning.com"
2) it is good for billboards and radio ads, easier to remember than any other, for this specific service/area
3) it is the exact phrase people will google if they want that particular service in that particular area
4) even if they have multiple variations of this domain, with this domain they throw a "wider net"
5) the competition will not get it if they buy it

Thanks for your reply mate.

Should've mentioned it earlier, but here goes. None of my domains I am about to offer are GEO domains. All are brandables. For example:

(Not mine)
FoodMatic .com
BestDentalcare

Granted none of my domains are completely generic or keyword-rich (like cupcakes .com), but partly they do represent businesses in a clearer way, even with a single word (like in the examples mentioned above.).
 

Domain Lead Finder

Established Member
Impact
570
The same principles still apply. You try to increase the value to the customer by pointing out the memorability and how more domain names throw a "wider net" than fewer domain names. Also mentioning defensive strategic registration against the competition availing the said domain names etc.

Its hard to give actual advice when I do not know the exact names but you get the point.
 

JamesCrew

Established Member
Impact
388
The same principles still apply. You try to increase the value to the customer by pointing out the memorability and how more domain names throw a "wider net" than fewer domain names. Also mentioning defensive strategic registration against the competition availing the said domain names etc.

Thanks, I get the picture. Making them realize the value of domains is crucial. But along these lines, like I mentioned previously:

Its hard to give actual advice when I do not know the exact names but you get the point.
The companies I am aiming to contact have a variety of businesses already running in the sector and I believe my domains would give them additional room to capture other similar markets they are already in. Of course, I just need to find a way to make them realize this point.

I also need to give them the "idea" about additional space they can cover in the markets they are already doing business with. This is the thing I need them to realize and take action as well (action = buy my domains or at least show interest in them).

For example, a company dealing in car rental services may also be interested (or have future plans) to dive into other auto sectors like car sales, luxury car rentals and etc.. If not that, then at least the "defensive registration" option is still valid for me, hehehe.
 

Willox Perez

MemberEstablished Member
Impact
707
When contacting end users it is best to keep the email simple and to the point. Also make sure you reference their domain/site in the email and then state you feel that your domain will be beneficial to them.

When finding end users it makes sense to reach out to people who have similar domains names, are ranking in Google search for the same domain keyword term, are advertising on adwords for that term as well. These are very targeted and will result in a better response rate.

Another very important tip is to get a person's first name you are contacting and use it in the subject line as well as the body of the email. A simply Hi first name will work wonders.

- Will
 

JamesCrew

Established Member
Impact
388
When contacting end users it is best to keep the email simple and to the point. Also make sure you reference their domain/site in the email and then state you feel that your domain will be beneficial to them.

When finding end users it makes sense to reach out to people who have similar domains names, are ranking in Google search for the same domain keyword term, are advertising on adwords for that term as well. These are very targeted and will result in a better response rate.

Another very important tip is to get a person's first name you are contacting and use it in the subject line as well as the body of the email. A simply Hi first name will work wonders.

- Will

Appreciate your detailed response mate.

As much as I admire and like to keep emails simple and concise, I am getting a feeling that this outreach campaign may require some long lines of sentences, as I not only have to offer my domain, but also have to make them aware how the offered domain can help them with their business expansion.

I have the "first name" part covered as I am planning to use linkedin this time to pitch the domains. First time using linkedin for outreach, wish me luck. Anyone here with similar linkedin experience, please chime in.
 

Theydon

Established Member
Impact
412
What to put in an email is probably one of the most discussed areas of domain selling, it often comes down to personal preference. For me it depends on the name, a few examples:
  • the benefits to the end user are obvious (its a name upgrade, i.e. it is shorter and a better brand than their current one, or the name has decent search vol and the company pays to advertise the keywords) - short and simple for me, no need to over sell it, just tell them its available and you believe it would be a good fit for their business
  • you believe the name would be of interest to the company but the benefits are not as obvious as the above example, if you have price expectations under $500 I would state the price in the email
  • brandable names are a tough sell on out reach email, but if they are good then I try to create a subtle 'call for action' such as 'you are contacting companies in that niche' as you believe its a strong brand and 'only one company can own the brand ……..' it will be sold on a 'first come first served basis'
Its really difficult with emails, you need to sell the name but people hate being sold to so you need to keep it low key. It also depends on the knowledge of the decision maker, he could be a numb nuts who needs the benefits explaining to him, chances are with larger organisations this is not the case so I would not over sell.

Be careful about putting links in the email body, it could be treated as spam.

Good luck.