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opinion WARNING: The ngTLD and ccTLD Fallacy and Trap

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Ategy

Arif M, NameCult.com TheDomainSocial.comTop Member
Impact
17,341
Original article at: http://namecult.com/warning-the-ngtld-and-cctld-fallacy-and-trap/

I’m writing this as the .VC tld is about to try to get their domain extension on the .CO and .IO bandwagon with a deep discount sale. While these are technically ccTLDs (Country Code Top-Level Domains) and not actual ngTLDs (New Generic Top-Level Domains), they, along with others like .TV, .ME, .GG, .AI and the afore mentioned .CO and .IO. have been repurposed into more generic non-geo-specific domain extensions (although some have been repurposed into very narrow specific niches not much wider than their original geo-specific intent).

Over the last year or so we’re seeing an increased number of particularly .CO, .IO and .AI domains start to sell into the 5-figures. Some even high 5-figures. A couple of weeks ago a domainer sold two .VC domains within a day at about $5,000 each and created a fairly big buzz (the likely reason the .VC registry is trying to take advantage of the publicity by doing a big discount promotion).

Whether coincidence or exploitation, this fact the .VC registry is about to start a discounted sale on new registrations of their domains in turn leads me to write this very strong warning to all domain investors not just about .VC domains, but about most of these “repurposed” ccTLDs and even ngTLDs in general …

The big problem with these extensions is that when one of their domains do sell in the 4 and 5-figure range, it becomes big news. But deceptively does not make “the news”, is the fact that it’s almost only exclusively the very strongest one-word domains that sell at these levels and frequencies.

YES .. before anyone jumps in with some examples of rare exceptions, as with all things domain related, there are indeed are exceptions, and there will continue to be. More importantly, there are some TLDs that are stronger than others in certain categories. .CO for example is more of a broad ranging domain extension, and as such it appeals to a wider range of potential buyers, which in turn means that a wider range of domains have the potential to sell at relatively decent multiples. Including compound words and even the very best of two word domains (although very rarely in the 5-figures).

What is important to note however, is the unseen reality. Which is that the vast super majority of domains in these supposedly “hot” domain extensions actually do not sell, and very likely will never sell .. and even less likely to ever sell at a multiple that would make them a worthwhile investment to domain investors. In fact, the reality is that compared to .COM, these TLDs are NOT “hot” at all .. they are simply hotter than others, as most are simply uninvestable at just about any price.

What does increasingly sell at higher prices and higher frequencies, are the very top-tier one word domains of these “hotter” extensions. Not only are the domains selling the very best, but portion of the domain left-of-the-dot (SLD) also needs to be related to the TLD and/or a great generic brand name.

For example, the .GG extension is hot for video game related websites because “GG” is a term gamers often say to each other after playing each other to mean “Good Game”. So if you have a strong single word or very strong term related to gaming, that indeed would make for a good domain to invest in *IF* you get it at the right price.

The domainer fallacy, and big problem with these extensions, is that newer domain investors think the range and scope of sellable investment-grade domains is similar to that of .COM where hundreds of longer two and three word domains sell every day into the 4+ figures (GreenRoads.com and GreenStreet.com sold for $160,000 and $100,000 in the last year). Basically Adjective+Noun type combinations like AmazingTravel.com, GreenMountain.com and CarWashPros.com indeed can often be wise investments in .COM depending on the acquisition price.

The big warning to all potential domain investors, is that these type of multi-word domains do not sell in extensions other than .COM and ccTLDs that serve countries with strong economies and large populations (like .DE, .CO.UK, .CA., etc). There certainly are exceptions, but nowhere near enough to make multi-word Adjective + Noun domains a good investment in .GG, .AI, .IO and particularly not now with .VC.

Whether domains are investable or not really depends on their potential price-markup factored with their probability of sale, compared to the acquisition price paid by the investor. As the cost goes down, the potential sales multiple goes up. So when .XYZ ran their $0.01 promotion and even when .CO ran their $1 sale (before adding premium restrictions), it actually did make sense to slightly widen the range of potential domains to buy in those extensions. Although even then we saw domain investors buy domains that simply would never have any chance of selling at any price … otherwise known as burning your money.

Even within these niche “repurposed” TLDs, there is a wide range of optimal investment strategies. But as a basic general rule, it’s best to find single words or terms that match the purpose of the TLD itself. Meaning gaming related for .GG, tech related for .AI and .IO, media related for .TV, and finance related for .VC. VC stands for Venture Capital for the people and companies buying .VC domains at the highest prices, even if technically the .VC extension is the ccTLD for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

The best thing to do as a potential investor in these extensions is to check to see what previously sold. For example, in the last 5 years the only .IO in the top 50 highest reported sales that was not either a one-word domain or a two-letter acronym was CoinPay.io at $22,500. Otherwise it’s VERY strong single-word domains like Swipe.io, Lucky.io Tank.io, Jackpot.io, Matrix.io, Wiz.io, Home.io, Voice.io, Studio.io, Gate.io, etc

For .VC the only reported 5-figure sale in the last 5 years was VS.vc at $10,000 exactly. Then it drops to Bond.vc at $6120, and then a bunch in the $3000 to 5000 range like Basic.vc, Apollo.vc, Fuse.vs, 12.vc, Cash.vc, Launch.vc, OI.vc, Scale.vc, TM.vc, YY.vc.

The reality is that while most of these domains actually cost more than a .COM domain, they actually sell significantly less. Most importantly, the types of domains that do sell in these extensions are extremely limited in scope.

It’s best NOT to invest in anything not very short and not specific to the niche of the TLD. Most definitely do not acquire any random Adjective + Noun domains that would usually be a good investment in .COM. Same story for one-off brandable domains with deliberate misspells like removing a vowel or replacing an “S” with a “Z”.

I will end this by agreeing that there most certainly are exceptions to the guidelines I’ve mentioned. But until you’ve researched and learned what those likely and probable exceptions are, then avoid them at all costs. In fact, while I’ve singled out some of the more popular alternate domain extensions in this article, the same theory should be applied to just about ALL repurposed ccTLDs and ngTLDs … it’s the main reason why new domainers are warned to focus on .COM domains more than anything else when they start, because while even the vast majority of .COM domains acquired by domain investors are surprisingly actually bad investments (a warning for another day), domains outside of .COM are far worse.

So buyer beware of promotional sales of various TLDs .. at the end of the day, if a domain is virtually unsellable, then you should never invest in it regardless of price!


NOTE: Domain Data for this article was obtained from NameBio.com

Original article at: http://namecult.com/warning-the-ngtld-and-cctld-fallacy-and-trap/
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.

HotKey

Made in CanadaTop Member
Impact
10,668
A bad name is a bad name, regardless of the extension the promotional sale is on. The fallacy and trap is misleading newcomers into thinking buying into the .com extension makes it better.. it does not, it only softens the blow because everyone else is doing it. Just because an extension sells more doesn't make it right to invest in.

On the other hand, a good name is a good name, and we should encourage newcomers to look at doing better than re-purposing a word or phrase on the .com extension, and look to properly configure it to its niche, be it a ccTLD or new gTLD, as you mention. Once that is done, a buyer may be shown the benefits and merits of using a name in great form rather than an inferior spelling on a more popular extension.

Once we work on forming quality domain names over pushing out as much quantity as we can for the sake of sales, business names and websites will certainly be a much more pleasurable and memorable visit.
 
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Bipul

Established Member
Impact
273
Thank you for the post.
 
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boker

Top Member
Impact
3,708
Original article at: http://namecult.com/warning-the-ngtld-and-cctld-fallacy-and-trap/

I’m writing this as the .VC tld is about to try to get their domain extension on the .CO and .IO bandwagon with a deep discount sale. While these are technically ccTLDs (Country Code Top-Level Domains) and not actual ngTLDs (New Generic Top-Level Domains), they, along with others like .TV, .ME, .GG, .AI and the afore mentioned .CO and .IO. have been repurposed into more generic non-geo-specific domain extensions (although some have been repurposed into very narrow specific niches not much wider than their original geo-specific intent).

Over the last year or so we’re seeing an increased number of particularly .CO, .IO and .AI domains start to sell into the 5-figures. Some even high 5-figures. A couple of weeks ago a domainer sold two .VC domains within a day at about $5,000 each and created a fairly big buzz (the likely reason the .VC registry is trying to take advantage of the publicity by doing a big discount promotion).

Whether coincidence or exploitation, this fact the .VC registry is about to start a discounted sale on new registrations of their domains in turn leads me to write this very strong warning to all domain investors not just about .VC domains, but about most of these “repurposed” ccTLDs and even ngTLDs in general …

The big problem with these extensions is that when one of their domains do sell in the 4 and 5-figure range, it becomes big news. But deceptively does not make “the news”, is the fact that it’s almost only exclusively the very strongest one-word domains that sell at these levels and frequencies.

YES .. before anyone jumps in with some examples of rare exceptions, as with all things domain related, there are indeed are exceptions, and there will continue to be. More importantly, there are some TLDs that are stronger than others in certain categories. .CO for example is more of a broad ranging domain extension, and as such it appeals to a wider range of potential buyers, which in turn means that a wider range of domains have the potential to sell at relatively decent multiples. Including compound words and even the very best of two word domains (although very rarely in the 5-figures).

What is important to note however, is the unseen reality. Which is that the vast super majority of domains in these supposedly “hot” domain extensions actually do not sell, and very likely will never sell .. and even less likely to ever sell at a multiple that would make them a worthwhile investment to domain investors. In fact, the reality is that compared to .COM, these TLDs are NOT “hot” at all .. they are simply hotter than others, as most are simply uninvestable at just about any price.

What does increasingly sell at higher prices and higher frequencies, are the very top-tier one word domains of these “hotter” extensions. Not only are the domains selling the very best, but portion of the domain left-of-the-dot (SLD) also needs to be related to the TLD and/or a great generic brand name.

For example, the .GG extension is hot for video game related websites because “GG” is a term gamers often say to each other after playing each other to mean “Good Game”. So if you have a strong single word or very strong term related to gaming, that indeed would make for a good domain to invest in *IF* you get it at the right price.

The domainer fallacy, and big problem with these extensions, is that newer domain investors think the range and scope of sellable investment-grade domains is similar to that of .COM where hundreds of longer two and three word domains sell every day into the 4+ figures (GreenRoads.com and GreenStreet.com sold for $160,000 and $100,000 in the last year). Basically Adjective+Noun type combinations like AmazingTravel.com, GreenMountain.com and CarWashPros.com indeed can often be wise investments in .COM depending on the acquisition price.

The big warning to all potential domain investors, is that these type of multi-word domains do not sell in extensions other than .COM and ccTLDs that serve countries with strong economies and large populations (like .DE, .CO.UK, .CA., etc). There certainly are exceptions, but nowhere near enough to make multi-word Adjective + Noun domains a good investment in .GG, .AI, .IO and particularly not now with .VC.

Whether domains are investable or not really depends on their potential price-markup factored with their probability of sale, compared to the acquisition price paid by the investor. As the cost goes down, the potential sales multiple goes up. So when .XYZ ran their $0.01 promotion and even when .CO ran their $1 sale (before adding premium restrictions), it actually did make sense to slightly widen the range of potential domains to buy in those extensions. Although even then we saw domain investors buy domains that simply would never have any chance of selling at any price … otherwise known as burning your money.

Even within these niche “repurposed” TLDs, there is a wide range of optimal investment strategies. But as a basic general rule, it’s best to find single words or terms that match the purpose of the TLD itself. Meaning gaming related for .GG, tech related for .AI and .IO, media related for .TV, and finance related for .VC. VC stands for Venture Capital for the people and companies buying .VC domains at the highest prices, even if technically the .VC extension is the ccTLD for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

The best thing to do as a potential investor in these extensions is to check to see what previously sold. For example, in the last 5 years the only .IO in the top 50 highest reported sales that was not either a one-word domain or a two-letter acronym was CoinPay.io at $22,500. Otherwise it’s VERY strong single-word domains like Swipe.io, Lucky.io Tank.io, Jackpot.io, Matrix.io, Wiz.io, Home.io, Voice.io, Studio.io, Gate.io, etc

For .VC the only reported 5-figure sale in the last 5 years was VS.vc at $10,000 exactly. Then it drops to Bond.vc at $6120, and then a bunch in the $3000 to 5000 range like Basic.vc, Apollo.vc, Fuse.vs, 12.vc, Cash.vc, Launch.vc, OI.vc, Scale.vc, TM.vc, YY.vc.

The reality is that while most of these domains actually cost more than a .COM domain, they actually sell significantly less. Most importantly, the types of domains that do sell in these extensions are extremely limited in scope.

It’s best NOT to invest in anything not very short and not specific to the niche of the TLD. Most definitely do not acquire any random Adjective + Noun domains that would usually be a good investment in .COM. Same story for one-off brandable domains with deliberate misspells like removing a vowel or replacing an “S” with a “Z”.

I will end this by agreeing that there most certainly are exceptions to the guidelines I’ve mentioned. But until you’ve researched and learned what those likely and probable exceptions are, then avoid them at all costs. In fact, while I’ve singled out some of the more popular alternate domain extensions in this article, the same theory should be applied to just about ALL repurposed ccTLDs and ngTLDs … it’s the main reason why new domainers are warned to focus on .COM domains more than anything else when they start, because while even the vast majority of .COM domains acquired by domain investors are surprisingly actually bad investments (a warning for another day), domains outside of .COM are far worse.

So buyer beware of promotional sales of various TLDs .. at the end of the day, if a domain is virtually unsellable, then you should never invest in it regardless of price!


NOTE: Domain Data for this article was obtained from NameBio.com

Original article at: http://namecult.com/warning-the-ngtld-and-cctld-fallacy-and-trap/
I wonder what's your personal experience regarding cctld or even ngtlds? Did you invested enough to see how it goes? I can tell you, from my own experience, that there are cctlds that have huge STR compared to .com's Also, talking about .co, io, .tv and ngtlds, I don't think that you have seen to many domain investors buying 2 words (sometimes), 3 even less. Also, comparing the amount of domains taken in .com and in any other cctld, you will have around 130 millions of .com's and 1,5 millions or so of .co's, so a big difference in availability. You can have a bad investent in .com as well as in any other cctlds. By the way, I know guys who lost money investing only in LLLL.com, because they have over paid, so that proves that you can loose money either way. So, you can loose money by paying $69-$250 for a .com backorder/auction and you can make money by paying $5 for a .VC or $140 for a premium .co, if you are doing it wisely. It's like saying that, if you invest money in the stock market, you should do it just by investing in the big companies, but the true is that most of the brokers are making the big money by investing in smaller companies.
 
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oldtimer

SaveThyWorld.com Let's not leave anyone behindTop Member
Impact
6,319
Thanks for a very thoughtful article,

But one thing that should be factored in for domains in alternative extensions is the ratio of risk to reward.

Taking advantage of super promos and special sales will drastically increase the rewards compare to any potential risks that might be encountered with alternative extensions.

But no matter how small the risks are compare to the rewards you still have to make sure that there is going to be a reward to be had at the end of the road when taking a chance with these kinds of domains to begin with and that's where doing your homework in the way of research and analysis of a certain extension and the domains that work with that extension come into play. Such as looking at past sales for domains in that extension and figuring out what keywords are the best match for that extension if it is targeted towards a certain Industry or category that narrows its use to some limited applications.

In my opinion not taking advantage of super discounted promos is a mistake, but jumping in without doing your homework about these opportunities is also a mistake so is getting carried away and registering hundreds or thousands of domains that have close to zero potential.

So if you go about this in a smart way and equip yourself with the right knowledge and skills then a super special promo could become a good opportunity to acquire some good domains.

IMO
 
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Spex

Established Member
Impact
640
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A lot of great points made in the original and following posts. My biggest sale was a .co, but for .co and now .vc I limit registrations for myself to 10-20 names max. Then I revisit what is worth keeping each year. I remember .mobi and I had a registered a ton of those but they were in high demand and sold multiple names for $X,XXX back then. Haven't seen the same interest since.

On a side note, I would love to see the new .vc registrations. Maybe someone can start a post if there isn't once already in the ccTLD section.
 
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I still own Sex (dot) vc. Any motivated brokers around?
 
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Ategy

Arif M, NameCult.com TheDomainSocial.comTop Member
Impact
17,341
A bad name is a bad name, regardless of the extension the promotional sale is on. The fallacy and trap is misleading newcomers into thinking buying into the .com extension makes it better.. it does not, it only softens the blow because everyone else is doing it. Just because an extension sells more doesn't make it right to invest in.

That's not really what I meant as I most certainly do agree .. I'll be the first to say even most .COM domains are worthless garbage! lol .. In fact .. I actually did say it in the last paragraph of my original post above.

In fact, I agree with you so much on that, that instead of telling people to stick to buying .COM when they start, depending on the domains they show me, I usually tell them to buy NO domains at all until they've gotten a better grasp of the industry.

Because of my work with NameCult and The Domain Social, I get a significant number of newer investors reach out to me for advice on their early purchases. Combine that with the fact that for my lists at NameCult I probably manually go through more domains per day than almost anyone else in the industry. As a result of that I can say with certainty that yes, a big problem with newcomers is that they don't understand the very sharp and significant difference in scope in SLD of what makes a good investment in .COM vs most of the repurposed ccTLDs and gnTLDs.

Effective the scope of what's a good investment in .COM is quite small .. but whatever that number is, I'm just trying to say that for .VC and other repurposed domain extensions the scope of what makes for a good investment is a tiny fraction of that already small number. Maybe 1% or even less (so effectively 1% of 1% type of thing).

Because of my contacts with a large number of newcomers, I can say for sure that there are many that go for the altTLDs with two-words and/or one-offs and misspells. This post isn't really for the domainers who have been around a few years and have already figured out that the average Adjective+Noun in .VC or .GG is a bad investment .. and on top of that know enough about the specific TLDs in question to have a significantly better chance of finding those exceptions that aren't bad investments.


Also, talking about .co, io, .tv and ngtlds, I don't think that you have seen to many domain investors buying 2 words (sometimes), 3 even less.

Most of what I wrote above this also applies here. I'm not really talking about those of you who are still around after a few years .. those who have survived domaining more than 2-3 renewal cycled have either already learned this .. or are no longer domaining. But when it comes to newer investors, the fact is that because of my work with NameCult and TheDomainSocial, I do get sent a lot of domains from new domainers looking for help and suggestions. Countless Adjective+Noun AltTLDs that would be borderline in .COM .. or AltTLDs with deliberate misspells.

Effectively for the average person posting regularly on NamePros who's been a domainer more than a couple of years it's very definitely a problem for some, but I'll agree with you that it's not for most. However .. for the average person lurking and just reading NamePros who have been investing under a year or two, it's a very serious issue (and why I wrote this article in the first place).


By the way, I know guys who lost money investing only in LLLL.com, because they have over paid, so that proves that you can loose money either way.
Yup .. although that's a very different discussion .. I've long said I'm not a fan of investing in random 4L .com domains unless you can acquire above average quality 4L's at the base liquid average price. When it comes to 4L's, very much like each TLD in general, all domains most certainly are not equal.

Again .. I'll state that even .COM domains in general are not good investments unless you know what you're doing.

What I am saying however, is that the scope of what is investable in .COM is significantly wider than these "repurposed" AltTLDs. Certainly money can be made in both .. and money can be lost in both. But it is a lot easier to lose money in AltTLDs because of the vastly narrower band of SLDs that are investable.

So, you can loose money by paying $69-$250 for a .com backorder/auction and you can make money by paying $5 for a .VC or $140 for a premium .co, if you are doing it wisely.
Again .. I agree 100%. lol .. It's just that the bulk of the domains I see from newish investors approaching me for help and advice are handreg non-premium domains. Trust me .. I did not write this article for nothing
 
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@Ategy posted a great article. However, I would say - let the .vc show continue. This country code is of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, a small Caribbean nation, they obviously need more $$$, why not to help? Such small nations do depend on international tourism, which is now dead...
Moreover, from a pure business point of view, those who do not invest in .vc also can and should only appreciate extra spending of their competitors... as it means somewhat less speculative capital in more traditional markets.
 
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It is always good to stress that in .com all sorts of types of domain names sell, whereas in most other extensions major sales are usually only of single words that make sense for that extension.

At the time that I published the interview with @Kingpin1966 there were only 1700 .vc extension names for sale on all the marketplaces combined (I am sure that number will go way up in the coming days due to the promotion). While I did not calculate a sell-through rate, if we combine the 60 .vc sales recorded in NameBio for the last year, that is about a 3.5% sell-through rate, a figure substantially above the industry wide average or .com alone (when calculated similarly, with the $100+ and only count sales listed in NameBio). Now small number statistics, but interesting.

At the time I did the interview, and compiled the statistics, I had personally not only never registered a .vc domain name, I had not even looked for any to register when everyone else it seemed was madly searching following the back to back $5000 sales. But with this great promotion, I have now given a small number a try. For me it is the point that @oldtimer makes above: the potential reward to risk ratio. At a much lower acquisition price, the risk went way down. I don't think promotions are good for the industry, but they are good for me:xf.grin:, so I will take advantage of them.

The other thing that surprised me was, considering the rather low registration base, how many .vc were being meaningfully used.

Jason had fantastic answers throughout the interview, but I agree with @Spex that the one re ask yourself if it is a single word name that is a 6 figure .com, and also a word potentially meaningful for venture capital.

Thanks for the article @Ategy and the good discussion by all in the thread.

Bob
 
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NickB

it's a mysteryTop Member
Impact
16,347
Nice article - People (generally newbies, though not always the case) are quick to jump on the bandwagon or next supposed big thing without giving it to much thought (I personally have been there and done that with domains a few times!)

I have the grand sum of 2 .vc domains - Mortgage (recently renewed) and Track

Over the weekend I went through the 10,000 most popular word list (https://github.com/first20hours/google-10000-english/blob/master/google-10000-english.txt) and had a look at their availability for this promo and at the end of it decided to give it a miss, there where some half decent words (maybe some good ones?) available but as pointed out half decent does not cut the mustard with these types of extensions........
 
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Mister Funsky

Top Member
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24,205
So buyer beware of promotional sales of various TLDs .. at the end of the day, if a domain is virtually unsellable, then you should never invest in it regardless of price!

Well said. Thanks for the detailed and thoughtful article.

I've said before in other posts that I am mainly a .com investor and only dabble in a few of the 'new' extensions. Yes, if someone is fortunate enough to find a .vc that makes sense, whether a sort of hack or single word that is premium, then it might be worth the investment.

In my case, the letters VC bring back negative memories I had as a child...I recall my much older brother speaking of what he encountered during the Vietnam War. I know it makes no sense to disregard an extension for a reason like that, but I kept finding myself flashing back to distant memories and stories he told of that awful period...for all nations/everyone involved.

So, due to 1) recent expenditures in acquiring a few very premium .com names 2) the expense in maintaining a large and growing portfolio 3) radio test issues, I will not jump on this bandwagon.

I sincerely wish anyone that does take advantage of the reduced pricing well and look forward to him/her posting their first big sale.
 
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oldtimer

SaveThyWorld.com Let's not leave anyone behindTop Member
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It's also important to realize that there is a very small window of opportunity for registering domains in an extension that already has very limited viable domains to offer, and once the first tier domains that make sense for that extension are all registered it is not wise to go after any second or third tier domains unless that extension becomes very popular, but even then it's important not to forget that some extensions have a very narrow use as far as the Industry and category that they are targeting.

There have been many trains that have arrived in the history of domaining, those people who jump on a train early and register the best domains (or buy them cheap in the aftermarket immediately afterwards) and have a plan and strategy of getting off the train at the right time have a real chance to do good, but if you miss a train because you didn't have the right knowledge and skills or didn't have the financial resources at the time or just weren't quick enough it's best not to dabble in leftovers, there will surely be other trains arriving in the future and the best thing to do is to learn as much as you can about domains and domaining so that you'll be ready when the next opportunity presents itself.

Whether it's a new extension that becomes the talk of the town or whether it's a new future trend that becomes hot there is always going to be other opportunities in the future to find some nice domains, the important thing is to be ready so that you can get the best choices that have the most potentials.

IMO
 
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Lox

_____Top Member
Impact
9,261
I'll be the first to say even most .COM domains are worthless garbage! lol

10 x $9 = $90 year, .com garbage domains approximately earn $2000 (spam / mass email services) , for scam ... who knows.

Regards
 
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at the end of the day, if a domain is virtually unsellable, then you should never invest in it regardless of price!
While this is true of course, it is also true that for a domain that does have reasonable probability of sale at a retail price is now $5 instead of $35, your quantitative prospects for the name have significantly improved (at least for year one holding).
it’s best to find single words or terms that match the purpose of the TLD itself.
This is the key point, and I agree 100% with it. Fortunately even today there are a few appropriate single words available, although supply shrinking rapidly by the hour.

Be interesting to see how many more investors handling .vc will change prospects. Will it help drive acceptance and further use, or will the competition 'cheapen' the extension and be a barrier?

I think the success of .io among startups has paved the way, to some degree, for others to use general country code extensions (and possibly some of the new gTLDs). Most businesses will prefer the .com still, but if the choice in their price range is a 2-word or uncommon word .com, or a positive single common word in another extension like .io, .ai or .vc, clearly some companies are preferring the latter, as a few recent analyses have shown.

Bob
 
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NickB

it's a mysteryTop Member
Impact
16,347
Someone or a few people are hoovering up a LOT of .vc domains

Was rechecking through Epik on availability and they are going fast, looks like someone has put a big list together and is just registering what is available.......I mean some of the domains being registered make you wonder why
 
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oldtimer

SaveThyWorld.com Let's not leave anyone behindTop Member
Impact
6,319
Someone or a few people are hoovering up a LOT of .vc domains

Was rechecking through Epik on availability and they are going fast, looks like someone has put a big list together and is just registering what is available.......I mean some of the domains being registered make you wonder why

That's a strategy that some domainers employ who don't want to do targeted research, they cast a wide net by taking advantage of a special promo price and registering over a 1000 domains in the hopes that they can sell one or two and recuperate their original investment, but this strategy is kind of risky because if they can't sell a few domains quickly then they are faced with the renewal charges that are going to be at regular prices.

At some point domaining can turn from investing in to gambling, people have to be careful not to cross that line (of course unless they are good at gambling).

IMO
 
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NickB

it's a mysteryTop Member
Impact
16,347
That's a strategy that some domainers employ who don't want to do targeted research, they cast a wide net by taking advantage of a special promo price and registering over a 1000 domains in the hopes that they can sell one or two and recuperate their original investment, but this strategy is kind of risky because if they can't sell a few domains quickly then they are faced with the renewal charges that are going to be at regular prices.

At some point domaining can turn from investing in to gambling, people have to be careful not to cross that line (of course unless they are good at gambling).

IMO
Think they might of been better off just getting a list of all possible 3 letter combinations and registering those instead of any old one word domain.....
 
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My rule of thumb: If I can't point to the country representing the ccTLD on the map, I don't register such domains. :-D
 
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oldtimer

SaveThyWorld.com Let's not leave anyone behindTop Member
Impact
6,319
Think they might of been better off just getting a list of all possible 3 letter combinations and registering those instead of any old one word domain.....

Some two word domains that are a good match for the extension are probably a better choice than just random one word domains,

Something like:

Medical Technology / VC

That is currently available.

IMO
 
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ecomslice

Top Member
Impact
1,625
Agreed. And I'll be honest. I think Tasting. Testing. And Supporting is a great thing.

But narcissistic cohersion tactics for some pipe dream to reg fast as you can, just burns the faith I have for those carrying leadership roles.
 
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biggie

GreenFriendly.comTop Member
Impact
15,043
just burns the faith I have for those carrying leadership roles.

lol

and who are these role playing leaders, that burns ye faith?

point em out! :)

imo....
 
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oldtimer

SaveThyWorld.com Let's not leave anyone behindTop Member
Impact
6,319
Agreed. And I'll be honest. I think Tasting. Testing. And Supporting is a great thing.

But narcissistic cohersion tactics for some pipe dream to reg fast as you can, just burns the faith I have for those carrying leadership roles.

That's a good point, whenever people give you advice either for or against something you have to ask yourself are they doing it to help you or are they doing it to help themselves by benefiting from the situation somehow.

IMO
 
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ecomslice

Top Member
Impact
1,625
lol

and who are these role playing leaders, that burns ye faith?

point em out! :)

To me a "leadership" role is any one of experience commenting on a subject in public where they know those that will hear or read are looking up to them as a mentor.

imo....
 
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