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The Domaining Dictionary

Located in Domain Beginners started by Bannen, Jan 21, 2012.

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  1. Bannen

    Bannen Entitlement: What has BREATHING ever done for ME? VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I've been thinking of starting this thread for awhile, so here it is.
    Many newbies and pros alike still daily ask about certain terms, so I wanted to create this resource thread to link to anytime anyone asks what a domaining term means.

    I'll add definitions as they arise, other members are welcome to write clear, well-written definitions here also, and anyone is welcome to post a question about a term and we will try to write a clear definition for you. *If I get any details wrong here, or something's unclear, feel free to let me know.

    Here are a few of the most common terms still asked about, to get us started:

    BIN - in sales threads you'll see 'BIN price' or 'buy at BIN'. BIN stands for 'Buy It Now' and is considered the instant selling price if you want to bypass making lesser offers or bidding up in an auction for a domain. Many auctions or 'make offer' sales do not set a BIN, just in case bids/offers rise higher than that BIN amount, but most domainers have a good idea of the top price they want for a domain and will set a BIN price just in case they luck out and a buyer wants the domain enough to buy at BIN and not risk losing it to anyone else.

    End User - you often hear of domainers selling domains to 'end users'. This term refers to a buyer who plans to use a domain for considerable development. A corporation or person who has a large vested interest in that website, for business or extensive personal use, does not plan to trade or resell that domain name (unless an irresistable offer arises) so they are considered the 'end of the line' for that domain, the user who has the final use of it and will likely never sell it again. Basically a domain is traded from owner to owner until it finds the ideal end user who will keep it indefinitely. Since the end user has so much interest in the name, they also usually pay much more for that domain than will a reseller who intends to profit on the name by reselling it at a higher price.

    Grace Delete - grace deletion refers to the process of deleting a domain name shortly after you registered it. There are many reasons people register domains and then delete them within a few days; commonly it is simply a matter of 'sobering up', ha ha, and realizing it's not as good a domain as you thought yesterday. Other reasons range from discovering the name is based on a trademark, to tasting the domain for traffic and then letting it go.
    Grace deletion is not a service offered by all registrars, you don't have a 'right' to delete a domain and get a refund, it's a service volunteered by some registrars. The ones that offer this allow you a 'grace period' - usually a handful of days after registration date but this varies - for you to delete a domain. Some registrars offer an automated system so you can perform the grace delete yourself, while with other registrars you must send their support a request to delete your domain/s.
    Note that any registrar can delete your domain (certain extensions anyway, like dot.com) when you ask them to, any time, but the 'grace delete' term refers to you actually getting some or most of your registration fee back, when deleting your domain within a specified (short) amount of time after registering it. Registrars who offer the grace delete service will set their own grace period, their own rate for this service (usually a small percentage of your reg fee), and determine their own process. Grace delete is just a short term for 'register a domain, delete it again within a short time, and get a partial refund back'.

    LLL, LLLL, CVCV, CCC, etc etc. - these are domainer-speak, or slang or code or jargon, for certain types of domain name configurations. Please see Post #6 below for full explanation.

    Parking - domain parking is a quick, non-development system of pointing your domain name to a simple landing page or pages that offer an automated template website, usually containing some paid advertising links and/or very simplified content, both of these automated. For more description see Post #7 below.

    Push - a 'push' is a kind of domain transfer, but is different technically from the word 'transfer' (see definition for 'transfer' below). A push is when you transfer a domain name WITHIN THE SAME REGISTRAR, but to a different user. For example, if your domain is at the registrar Godaddy, you can push it to a different user who also has an account at Godaddy. Each registrar has their own procedure and requirements for a push, but most registrars follow the same basic structure:
    A push can be done anytime, even immediately after regging the name; a push is immediate, taking a few seconds to a few minutes until it is in the new user's account; a push is usually free and does not require the new user to renew the name for another year, rather the same expiration date is kept; a push is simple, usually requiring you to know only the new user's username at your registrar, or their username and email, etc.
    A push also differs with a transfer in that a push is originated from the CURRENT owner's account, whereas a transfer is initiated from the NEW owner's account. To initiate a push, you select the domain you want to push, then you look around for something that says 'push domain' or 'initiate account change' or something like that, and follow instructions. The new owner must follow their own procedure to accept the push into their account.

    Reg Fee - this is an abbreviation of 'registration fee', the cost of registering a domain name. Each registrar has different prices for dot.com's and other TLD's and ccTLD'S, and most good registrars also offer discount e-coupons for different TLD's, fresh regs, renewals, etc. 'Reg Fee' is most commonly seen in the appraisals section, where a name is valued at 'reg fee'. Most reg fees for dot.com's are in the $7 - $12 range.

    Reseller - just that: a domainer who trades in domains. Resellers buy domains and do not develop them (unless it is with parking, minisites or minimal development for the purpose of making temporary income from the domain, or increasing its traffic/value for resale). As with any reseller, domainers ideally try to buy very low and sell very high. In a perfect world a reseller will reg a domain or buy it at a cheap reseller price, find the perfect end user for it, and sell high to that end user.

    TLD, ccTLD - Top Level Domains; please see Post #4 below for description.

    Transfer - a 'transfer' is differentiated from a 'push' (see definition for 'push' above). A transfer is when a domain name is transferred from one registrar TO A DIFFERENT REGISTRAR. The domain can be transferred to your account in the new registrar, or to a different person's account in a new registrar.
    Transfer procedures differ for different extensions and different registrars, but they follow some basic structures: a transfer is initiated by the NEW registrant's account, rather than by the CURRENT owner; but the current owner must supply the new owner with what is called an 'EPP code', which you will have to locate or create for the domain being transferred (creating/finding the EPP code varies according to different registrars, but it is necessary to every transfer of a dot.com and many extensions); the domain must also be 'unlocked', if it is locked, by the current registrant; a transfer is not instant like a push, it can take a few days to a few weeks to complete, or longer depending on the quality/efficiency of one or both registrars involved); a push is usually free, while for a transfer you must pay the reg fee at the new registrar, which gives you a year's reg time starting at the transfer date, losing any time still left on the reg at the previous registrar; also, whereas a push can be performed anytime, even immediately after buying or regging a name, a transfer usually has time restrictions - again, this varies by registrar and extension, but whenever you register or buy a dot.com there is usually a 60-day waiting period before you can transfer that domain again to another registrar. I will try write a clear outline of that 60-day waiting period for this dictionary, soon.

    x
    xx
    xxx
    x,xxx
    etc. - 'x's are used mainly in the appraisals section, to denote rough estimates of how much a domain is worth. Valuing a domain name is a vague process and prices differ wildly according to the domain, the economy, the end users' pockets, and other factors, so exact valuations cannot be given. So domainers use approximations that may include numbers or x's.
    The x's are simply substitutes for tens, hundreds, thousands, etc. For example, we may say a domain is worth $300 - 600... or we may put it another way and say it is worth mid-xxx.
    We may say it is worth $50 - 100, or mid to high xx. We might say it is worth $8, or high x.
    Here is a general outlay:
    x = 0 to 9, since it is a single digit.
    Low x = 0 - 3; mid x = 4 - 6; high x = 7 - 9.

    xx = 10 - 99, since it covers all double-digit numbers.
    Low xx = 10 - 30; mid xx = 40 - 60; high xx = 70 - 99.

    xxx = 100 - 999, since it covers all three-digit numbers.
    Low xxx = 100 - 300, mid xxx = 400 - 600; high xxx = 700 - 999.

    This breakdown continues through x,xxx and xx,xxx and xxx,xxx and x,xxx,xxx etc, referring to thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions.
    All these are vague approximate ranges.

    More definitions to come! Let me/us know if there are any domaining words you want defined.
    :)
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2014
    The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
  2. av1atic

    av1atic Established Member

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    great post. I believe this should be stickied both here and in the appraisal section
     
  3. johname

    johname Planet Futbol VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    You might as well define these too

    And the LLL CVCV types

    Hand Reg

    But The one that lacking is Grace Delete
     
  4. Bannen

    Bannen Entitlement: What has BREATHING ever done for ME? VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Thanks J; grace delete (in first post) and TLD (in this post) done. I'm adding the most-commonly-asked-about words to my first post (in alphabetical order), and the rest I'll put in posts down here. I'll change hierarchy around as needed, but I don't want the first post to be a mile long so will limit it to around 20 terms max.

    Things like CVCV and VCCV and LLL and CCC I have on my to-do list.


    TLD - this stands for Top Level Domain/s. In the domain world there is a hierarchy of domain+'extensions'. I won't get into complicated explanations of subdomains and multiple extension combinations (for example dot.gov.on.ca stands for a government site in Ontario, Canada). A horribly simplified TLD definition is simply the domain+'main' extensions you see on non-country domain extensions. Technically most of what you see is a gTLD, a 'generic' TLD. Domains with these extensions are generic worldwide, though each of them has its own rules and restrictions on who can register it. The most common gTLD's are dot.com, dot.net, dot.info, dot.org and others. Less common and more experimental gTLD's include dot.asia, dot.jobs, dot.mobi, dot.pro, dot.tel, dot.travel, and the new much-publicized dot.xxx. All these are TLD's, or more precisely gTLD's, generic the world over.
    The second most common TLD category is the ccTLD, which stands for Country Code Top Level Domain. These are domain+extensions that refer to individual countries and are regulated by those countries or agents of. Some of the common ccTLD's you'll see traded here are dot.ca (Canada), dot.us (US), dot.tv (Tuvalu), dot.ws (Samoa), and you'll sometimes see other ccTLD's being traded.
    When anyone refers to TLD generally here, they are referring to any of the generic TLD's like the dot.com/net/info/org, etc. That's all you need to know unless you're gonna go to geek level.
     
  5. lothos

    lothos Active Member VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    Nice start, this should be stickied.

    I actually started a very similar project late last year and haven't finished it yet. I have a handful of definitions also, definitely need to finish it some weekend.

    thedomaindictionary.com - The Domain Dictionary

    Shoot me a PM if you're interested in combining our efforts. I'd be open to making it a namepros community project if there's enough interest.

    Sharing what I have so far:


    ACTIVE - The Registry sets this status. An Active domain can be modified by the registrar and it can be renewed. The domain will be included in the zone if the domain has been delegated to at least one name server. This status is very common.

    OK - This is the standard status for a domain name, meaning it has no holds or restrictions. The domain will be included in the zone if the domain has been delegated to at least one name server. This status is very common.

    Registrar - A domain name Registrar is a company that registers domain names. They must be accredited by a Registry. Common examples of registrars include Godaddy, Moniker, and Network Solutions

    serverTransferProhibited - This status code prevents your domain from being transferred to another registrar. It is an uncommon status that's usually set during legal or other disputes, or when a redemptionPeriod status is in place. This status code is set by the registry.

    REGISTRAR-HOLD - This status is set by the sponsoring registrar. The domain can not be modified or deleted but it can be renewed. The registrar must remove the REGISTRAR-HOLD status to modify the domain. The domain will not be included in the DNS zone.

    Zone, or Zone File - A zone file is a text file that describes a DNS zone. A zone file contains mappings between domain names and IP addresses and other resources.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2012
  6. Bannen

    Bannen Entitlement: What has BREATHING ever done for ME? VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Domain types - I am referring to the slang, or code, or abbreviations, or 'domainer jargon' for certain types of domains. You often see LLLL.com mentioned, or CCC.com or LLL.net or CVCV.com or NNL.com. What do all these strange terms mean, since they are not the actual domain being referred to? These are all domainer-speak for certain categories of Letter, Number, Character, and other spelling combinations. Here's the lowdown:

    Letter combinations:
    LLL, LLLL, LLLLL - the 'L's' refer to Letter, so if you see someone talking about an LLLL.com or an LLL.net, etc, they are referring to the number of letters in the domain. QXTA.com has 4 Letters, so it is an LLLL.com, VHY.info has 3 Letters so it is an LLL.info.
    ***Note that when using 'L' designations for these types of domains, this designates a domain as NOT being a proper word, usually. Even though CARS.com is technically an LLLL.COM, there is a difference between an LLLL and a word, and in domainerspeak the LLLL is reserved for letter combinations that don't make a known word.
    3L, 4L, 4L - these are simply an even shorter way of referring to the above: when someone says they have a 3L .com, it means a 3-Letter dot.com (or any extension), 4L means a 4-Letter, 5L means a 5-Letter, etc.

    CVCV, CVVC, VCVC, CVVCV, etc. - when you see someone list a domain type using a combination of the letters 'C' and 'V', these refer to specific configurations of Consonants and Vowels. Once again, these usually refer to non-words, but rather patterns of letters, or letters that form a brandable, or made-up, word. I won't give an English lesson here, hopefully you know what a vowel and a consonant are, so here are a few examples. Althought these are usually used for LLLL (4 letter) domains, they are also commonly used to designate LLL and LLLLL types:
    Some LLLL (4-Letter domains) that are CVCV layout (consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel): dopu, pebi, saco, qega, xave
    Some VCVC: epuq, izux, ubeq, ovaq
    Some CVVC: qeoc, vaix, zuaq, xiaw
    Some VCCV: egti, ahxo, uqma, otre
    Some VVVV (4 vowels): iuae, eoeu
    Some CCCC (4 consonants; rarely used designation, since it confuses with CCC - see below): btgx, mrzg
    Here are also a few LLLLL (5 Letter) domains, with their V&C layouts:
    shobu.com - CCVCV
    meexo.com - CVVCV
    eggfe.com - VCCCV
    geeog.COM - CVVVC
    *Sometimes the letter 'Y' is included to the C&V layout. Y in domaining is considered a vowel, so the following LLLL can be considered a CVCV: goxy.com. This could also be written as the type LLLY (uncommon because it is confusing), or CVCY (more common, still a little confusing).

    Number combinations:
    Domains consisting only of numbers are written using 'N's, for Number; here are a few examples:
    NNNN.com - a 4-number dot.com, like: 7592.com, or 0029.com. Once again, as with letters, these designations are usually used for numbers that appear 'random', rather than meaning something. 1964.com would be considered a 'year .com' even though it is also technically an NNNN.com.
    NNNNN.com - a 5-number dot.com, like 89245.com or 55020.com.
    NN, NNN are a 2- and a 3-number domain, like 45.net (an NN.net) or 629.info (an NNN.info).

    Hyphen combinations:
    When you add one or more hyphens to the above combination types, these are also popular domainer terms:
    L-L-L.com - a dot.com that has 3 letters and 2 hyphens (5 characters in total), with hyphens between each letter. Examples: H-T-X.com, G-G-Q.com.
    LL-L.com, L-LL.com - these have a total of 4 characters, with only 1 hyphen. Examples: GX-T.com, M-HN.com.
    N-N-N.com - a dot.com that has 3 numbers and 2 hyphens (5 characters). Examples: 6-7-2.com, 9-4-4.com.
    NN-N.com, N-NN.com - examples: 74-2.com, 9-81.com

    Character combinations:
    Domains consisting of two or more of the 3 characters that can be used in the 'word' part of a domain are described as having a number of 'C's, or Characters. Only three characters can be used to form the name part of a domain: Letters, Numbers, and Hyphens. If a domain consists of two or more of these, it can be referred to in domainerspeak as a CC, or CCC. **These Character designations are typically limited to 2- and 3-character names. Here are some examples:
    CC combinations (2-character) - some examples: 6m.com, b3.net, 7h.info.
    *Note that a hyphen can only be placed between two other characters, so all 2-character names can only be created with a Letter and a Number.
    CCC combinations (3-character) - nb3.com, u45.net, m4u.info, v-5.com, 8-m.net.
    *Note that if the name has all letters or all numbers, but separated by hyphens, it is usually described in the previous sections. For example, R-T.com wouldn't usually be referred to as a CCC (3-character), but as an L-L (Letter, Hyphen, Letter). It is technically both, and both designations can be used, but L-L is more accurate. Another example, 4-8.com is indeed a CCC, but it is more accurate to call it a N-N.com.
    **Also note that there is considerable cross-designation in other ways; for example:
    65t.com - can be called a CCC (3-character), but also a NNL (Number, Number, Letter).
    9-g.net - can be called a CCC, but also a N-L (Number, Hyphen, Letter).

    You will become familiar with all of these and the confusion will wear off.
    Here's a quick guide:
    LL, LLL, LLLL, etc: number of Letters.
    NN, NNN, NNNN, etc: number of Numbers
    CVCV, CVVC, CCVCV, etc: combinations of Consonants and Vowels
    CC, CCC: combinations of Numbers, Letters, and Hyphens.
    LLN, LNL, NNL, NLN: combinations of Letters and Numbers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  7. Vito

    Vito Media Branding LLC Gold Account VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    Hey Bannen,

    Another great and informative Bannen thread.

    I read this thread the other day and I had a few other domaining terms in mind that werent on here. I should have added them all at that time because I cant think of them all right now. I can only think of a couple right now that are very important terms which were confusing to me as I first started in domaining...

    NameServer - In computing, a name server (also spelled nameserver) is a program or computer server that implements a name-service protocol. It maps a human-recognizable identifier to a system-internal, often numeric, identification or addressing component.

    The most prominent types of name servers in operation today are the name servers of the Domain Name System (DNS), one of the two principal name spaces of the Internet. The most important function of these DNS servers is the translation (resolution) of human-memorable domain names and hostnames into the corresponding numeric Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, the second principal Internet name space which is used to identify and locate computer systems and resources on the Internet.

    Parking - Domain parking is the registration of an Internet domain name without using it for services such as e-mail or a website i.e without placing any content on the domain. This may be done to reserve the domain name for future development, to protect against the possibility of cybersquatting, or to engage in cybersquatting. Since the domain name registrar will have set name servers for the domain, the registrar or reseller potentially has use of the domain rather than the final registrant.

    Domain parking can be classified as monetized and non-monetized. In the former, advertisements are shown to visitors and the registrant gains revenue. In the latter, an "Under Construction" or a "Coming Soon" message may or may not be put up on the domain by the registrar or reseller. This is a single-page website that people see when they type the domain name or follow a link in a web browser. Domain names can be parked before a web site is ready for launching.



    Then if you want to delve into domain development I think a couple of terms that are important and worth explanation may be

    FTP - File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used to transfer files from one host to another host over a TCP-based network, such as the Internet. FTP is built on a client-server architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and the server.[1] FTP users may authenticate themselves using a clear-text sign-in protocol but can connect anonymously if the server is configured to allow it.

    RSS (originally RDF Site Summary, often dubbed Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format.[2] An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed",[3] or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship.

    RSS feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. A standardized XML file format allows the information to be published once and viewed by many different programs. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favorite websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place.

    RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader", or "aggregator", which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. The user subscribes to a feed by entering into the reader the feed's URI or by clicking a feed icon in a web browser that initiates the subscription process. The RSS reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new work, downloads any updates that it finds, and provides a user interface to monitor and read the feeds. RSS allows users to avoid manually inspecting all of the websites they are interested in, and instead subscribe to websites such that all new content is pushed onto their browsers when it becomes available.

    Host/Hosting - Internet hosting service, a service that runs Internet servers allowing organizations and individuals to serve content to the Internet


    Im really not sure my definitions are the best way to explain each of these. I just grabbed the Wikipedia entries for these terms. If anyone wants to add or edit my definitions, please feel free.

    If I think of any more I will be sure to add them here.

    Thanks,
    Vito.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  8. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I might as well throw in the godaddy 60 day rule

    only can be transfered from one godaddy account to another

    A new reg or transfer cannot be transfered away from godaddy for 60 days

    I think this is the only registra that does this ,,, correct me if am wrong please
     
  9. Bannen

    Bannen Entitlement: What has BREATHING ever done for ME? VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Thank you for the post... but don't be lazy! ;)
    Maybe do a little more research and write about this difinitively. I think it's an ICANN rule and applies to all registrars... I'll look into it if you don't. Then I'll post the word in my first post and mention that the full descrip is in your (or my) post down here.
    :)
     
  10. twomoon

    twomoon Amat victoria curam PRO VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    No, no evirtual1 is right :)
    The 60 days ICANN rule is for newly registered domains at all registrars.
    Godaddy has it's own 60 days rule for not newly registered domains. For example If I won a name at TDNAM and domain is transfered to my account it's not allow to me to transfer it out during 60 days (only to other Godaddy acc.).

    Not sure if that rule works when I'm pruchasing a name from someone and he pushes it to my Godaddy acc. - in this case I also shoudl wait 60 days to transfer it out? Guess yes.
     
  11. networkguy

    networkguy Established Member

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    same with moniker too.




    .
     
  12. DU

    DU Secret Santa VIP

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    It's an acceptable transfer deny reason. Any registrar could at any time refuse a transfer within 60 days if they chose to. Some do, some don't, some sometimes do.

    Isn't there a wiki that covers this?

    ---------- Post added at 06:51 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:45 PM ----------

    I'm glad my dictionary has more editorial effort...

    [ame]http://youtu.be/hOSYiT2iG08[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  13. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I have only ever heard of godaddy regards this rule, i haven't had much to do with moniker in the past.

    ....... that must have been the please correct if i am wrong part

    I rang Hugh Laurie but he didn't know about moniker as well
     
  14. twomoon

    twomoon Amat victoria curam PRO VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    I disagree. It can't be that way. There are rules and GD has the 60 day registrar lock and noone else have it :) Proof - http://help.godaddy.com/article/418

    Whois data is changing, BAH - welcome 60 days lock. Name purchased at TDNAM (whois changed) - lock. Name purchased from someone else (whois changed) - lock.

    Never heard about something like that at Moniker as well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  15. DU

    DU Secret Santa VIP

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    Sorry - I didn't pay attention that it was an internal transfer/whois update.

    The rule I was talking about was for a:
    Domain name within 60 days of an initial registration or a previous transfer.

    These can be denied a transfer.
     
  16. ecalc

    ecalc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    domain sales thread title terminology
    aged - created 11 or 23 months ago
    brandable - looks like alphabet soup but harder to pronounce or remember; or, it would be impossible to monetize this domain without infringing on well known trademarks that have been registered since the Truman administration. I don't know the difference between branded and brandable.
    development potential - you'd have to be nuts to even think about developing this stinker
    dictionary word - no one has seen or heard this one since the middle ages
    future theme - remove anything from your mouth before clicking, I was the 5 millionth person to jump on the bandwagon
    high quality - revealing the actual name is too painful
    high search keywords - arranged backwards so expect zero type-ins during your lifetime
    looking for offers - I've been renewing this dog since 2005 and haven't received one bite
    must sell - just received UDRP complaint
    my best names - this is why I live in my parent's basement
    no time to develop - see 'development potential' above
    premium - see 'high quality' above
    rare - this name needs to drop like a bad transmission
    received several offers - in my dreams
    sounds like [popular word] - you'd never guess, so that's why I have to tell you
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
  17. johname

    johname Planet Futbol VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Added:

    Traffic Domain: "I cant target this traffic for @#$%"
    SEO Domain: "Has more hypens than the local cougar divorcee."
    High CPC Domain: "I never got more than a nickel parking it"
    Flippable: "I emailed spammed every person on the planet this name"
     
  18. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Pronouncable .........LLLL.Com (apparently all of them)
     
  19. networkguy

    networkguy Established Member

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    You could of saved a phone call and googled site:moniker.com 60 days rule ;)

    see:
    affiliates.moniker.com/help/dtc.jsp

    Code:
    [B][COLOR="Blue"]3. FEES, PAYMENT AND TERM OF SERVICE[/COLOR][/B]
    @12th line down:
    /...You agree that you may not transfer your domain name registration to another domain name
    registrar during the [COLOR="Red"][B][I][U]first sixty (60) days[/U][/I][/B][/COLOR] from the
    effective date of your initial domain name registration or change of ownership with us. .../
    
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
  20. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
    15,651
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    Cool ....... how come my girlfriend is in your avatar :lala:
     
  21. twomoon

    twomoon Amat victoria curam PRO VIP Trusted Contest Holder

    Posts:
    6,127
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    LOOOOOL
    This is just great!!! Rep added!

    My fav is "must sell" :)
     
  22. networkguy

    networkguy Established Member

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    LMAO :lol: "she's probably had more turns than a door knob!" :notme:

    :hearts: :P :P :P
     
  23. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
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    Hey Hey Hey ...... that's my cousin
     
  24. Kate

    Kate Domainosaurus Rex VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
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    NameNewbie is good but outdated. I also like Igoldrush that is even older but good for historical purposes :)
     
  25. DnEbook

    DnEbook DataGlasses.Com ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
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    has anyone read .......getrichclick ??
     

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