Dynadot

How Successful are DropCatch nowadays?

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Now that DropCatch has more registrars than all the other big drop-catchers put together, how are they doing in their % of captures.

I ask because I just put in a backorder yesterday for a domain at NameJet, SnapNames, Pheenix. It was won by DropCatch. The surprising thing was, to me, that all three of my drop-catchers, had some kind of notice, like acquiring the domain, or couldn't delete the backorder, whereas DropCatch already had the whois info up, and it was already listed on DropCatch and had bids. I was kind of pleasantly surprised by their speed and efficiency.

They should now be winning the biggest share of dropping domains picked up (over 50%, imho), but I just wonder if anyone has any more solid evidence, than just 1 domain?
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
i observed a lot of pending delete domains which have highest no:of bids on Namejet are caught by Dropcatch than any other drop catcher recently.I was wondering If they are allocating their resources not only based on the no:of backorders they receive but also based on the interest shown at Namejet.So all those domainers will turn up to the open auction at Dropcatch:)
 
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That's exactly what I did for my domain also :)

But the speed an efficiency on getting it up for auction was also impressive. Only a matter of a couple of hours after it had been caught.
 
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Is there an easy way to filter through DropCatch lists? They have no search criteria at the moment.
 
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DropCatch caches almost all good domains nowadays. And it is said that all caught domains go to auction. However, 2 days ago, a domain caught by them went directly to the owner... Their working style is still a secret, at least for me...
 
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Both HugeDomains and the general public can use DropCatch. So I don't see that as particularly surprising. Or am I wrong about that?
 
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Whois says:
"
WHOIS Server:
URL: http://www.NameBright.com
Registrar: DropCatch.com 583 LLC
IANA ID: 2063
"

And as I remember, when I tried to backorder a domain using Namebright, they asked to use Dropcatch.
 
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@Shelby90 - HugeDomains is usually the seller, NameBright is usually the registrar, DropCatch is usually the drop-catcher. They're all an interconnected business. Who is the Registrant?
 
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I asked who is the Registrant, not who is the Registrar.
 
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Registrant Contact
Name: Kevin Fernandez

This is not HugeDomains. This was a third party using DropCatch to capture the domain. Nothing to do with the HugeDomains/NameBright/DropCatch conglomerate. I presume he must have been the only bidder.
 
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Indeed :(
Their success rate is above all others right now.
In the past, even pheenix or dynadot were able to catch good names for me.
I backordered at SnapNames, Namejet, pheenix, name and dynadot and each time dropcatch.com caught it.
It is very unfortunate for those who are not eager to spend $xx,xxx on a domain.
If it is caught by them and there is public auction(as always) I just give up on the name.
Simple names go for $x,xxx-$xx,xxx, it is insane.
I don't bother to certify myself to bid above $60 since I know it is a lost cause.
I'm certain they are actively market those domains besides redirect to auction page.
 
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DropCatch sucks best than anything else on this planet, that I am certain of. Sorry about the rant.
 
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Why the negativity. They are running a successful business?
 
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Negativity because they bring anybody's research to a big 0. by placing the name to a public auction, where anyone can swagger and move in anytime they want.
It becomes more of a 'Who has the more money to win it' game once the name is in a public auction.
 
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DropCatch sucks best than anything else on this planet, that I am certain of. Sorry about the rant.

They are only good if only one person place a backorder.
I noticed that at first hand.
They captured 2 nice domains for me that no one placed a backorder.
But it is very rare to be able to do that often.
Their success rate will just attract more people to trust their system, which is bad news for those who don't have deep pockets but great news for their wallet.
 
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They are only good if only one person place a backorder.
I noticed that at first hand.
They captured 2 nice domains for me that no one placed a backorder.
But it is very rare to be able to do that often.
Their success rate will just attract more people to trust their system, which is bad news for those who don't have deep pockets but great news for their wallet.

I agree.

I did backorder a few times (in past, boycott them at present) with them, but mostly they weren't either successful, or sent names to public auctions otherwise.
 
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Negativity because they bring anybody's research to a big 0. by placing the name to a public auction, where anyone can swagger and move in anytime they want.
It becomes more of a 'Who has the more money to win it' game once the name is in a public auction.

Exactly. They screw their customers daily by converting their private backorders into public auctions. As far as I'm concerned that's an unethical practice and a form of front running. I want nothing to do with them.
 
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I'd say that they are running a successful business, but in unethical (not illegal) way. Now, resultingly, if one's business is hated by so many people, including - on the 1st place - customers, this business may not last too long. It is not about the number of registrars they set. It is karma...
 
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That's the problem, if you really want the name, you have to go with them, pay more, and forget about all the work you have done to find the name... Their success rate is too f***ing high...
 
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That's the problem, if you really want the name, you have to go with them, pay more, and forget about all the work you have done to find the name... Their success rate is too f***ing high...

Absolutely.
But it isn't the case always.

On 4 occasions I ordered a name everywhere (including DropCatch as I wanted the name badly). On all the occasions the other Bo companies worked for me.
Sadly, when I don't BO with them, their success rate is way too high.
 
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That's the problem, if you really want the name, you have to go with them, pay more, and forget about all the work you have done to find the name... Their success rate is too f***ing high...


Meh. There are other sources for domains besides deleting ones and dropcatch's success rate is not yet 100% so it's still possible to pick up drops elsewhere. I haven't given them any money in a good while and don't intend to change that policy for the foreseeable future. I'm in business to make profits for myself, not to turn it all over to Reberry. Paying him anything would IMO be the equivalent of providing financial support to my own rapist -- ain't gonna happen.
 
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@Nitindomains - I have no problem with them capturing any domain I have back-ordered elsewhere. They are the new big cat on the block as far as drop-catching goes. That's just business. The fact they operate differently to other drop-catchers is part of their business model, which they have determined brings them in the most money. That's just business also. You can decide to play or not play.

I kinda disagree that they bring anybody's research to 0. If it's a good domain, there is probably a more than 50% chance they will capture it. Everybody who has backordered the domain at any drop-catcher, including DropCatch, already have done their research, like I did in my example above. The fact I have joined the auction after it was captured doesn't mean I am stealing your research. I've done my own research.

But I agree that holding public auctions which anybody can join, has it's downsides. All those people who had losing backorders at other registrars can now join the auction at DropCatch, and have a second chance to win the domain. The price is probably going to go up higher than if it was a private auction. That is precisely why DropCatch use this system. OK. It's a change from how traditional drop-catchers have traditionally worked with private auctions, which probably kept a cap on prices. I wonder how long it will be before SnapNames or NameJet switch to a similar model. They must be hurting badly.

Of course, there will be people who haven't done any research and who have deep pockets, also using the system. It's not pleasant watching a domain you want being bid up beyond your budget. But unfortunately that is the new reality. I don't think DropCatch are going to put the genie back in the bottle. In fact I predict that SnapNames and/or NameJet will adopt a similar model, to boost the prices of the domains they do catch, which will make up for some of the revenue lost from dropping market share caused by the entrance of DropCatch into their market.

In short. Not meaning to be rude. Get over it.
 
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I don't see anything unethical in DropCatch's behaviour. They tell you exactly how they are going to operate. You can decide to use them or not. But with probably 50%+ market share, you are probably not going to use them at your own peril. You don't have to like it (btw: I don't like it also). But I do like, if I backorder elsewhere, and DropCatch capture the domain, I can have a second bite of the cherry, albeit probably at a higher cost.
 
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