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discuss ALL numeric .coms up to 9N getting registered after drop! Very weird!!!

Dynadot Dynadot
Impact
753
I am tracking 7N.coms last few weeks and noticed last few days they all (even bad ones) are getting registered after they drop. It is the same case with 8N and 9N.coms!!!

Can anybody explain? I must be missing something. I trace them at ExpiredDomains.net (check "Caught domains" list).
Some are caught by Huge Domains.

I don't understand why would anybody be backordering all 7N, 8N and 9N.coms while there are still some solid 7N.coms available.

Whats happening?
 
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DnEbook

DataGlasses.ComTop Contributor
Impact
5,706
I see domains lists but not specific heading for caught domains
 
Impact
753
When you log in, at upper part of your screen you will see "Links" menu. There you will find "Caught domains"
 

theSun

Account Closed (Requested)
Impact
904
Not weird. If you have been investing into stocks market before, you will find this kind of happenings in domaining very normal in comparison.
 
Impact
753
I did ;)
The only correlation with this case and investing in stocks I can find in creating wrong perception to uneducated investors. If that is the case here, it is pretty stupid and expensive IMO.
 

theSun

Account Closed (Requested)
Impact
904
Because if you know they are the phone numbers and mobile numbers of several countries, then you will understand why.
 

DnEbook

DataGlasses.ComTop Contributor
Impact
5,706
In australia we are 10 digit mobile phone numbers, is that the same for you guys ?
 

80-20

Established Member
Impact
437
If you are asking about China, HireDomains, I think their mobiles are 11 digits, but all other phones (including those where a local call charge only applies, like 1300 in AUS) are 10 dgits.
 

Brandon.Domains

Successful Internet Entrepreneur Since 1998Established Member
Impact
342
Why would you want a domain name that's your phone number? :-,

Brandon
 

Brandon.Domains

Successful Internet Entrepreneur Since 1998Established Member
Impact
342
I think it's the other way around. Chinese people pay a premium for "lucky" phone numbers and license plates.

But what's the use of having your phone number in dot com? Phones were invented almost 200 years ago and like incandescent light bulbs (invented 150 years ago) are on their way out.

Brandon
 

21x20

Domainer Since '95 #oldschool #orjustoldTop Contributor
Impact
835
I think it's the other way around. Chinese people pay a premium for "lucky" phone numbers and license plates.

But what's the use of having your phone number in dot com? Phones were invented almost 200 years ago and like incandescent light bulbs (invented 150 years ago) are on their way out.

Brandon

Unified identity would seem to be the most obvious reason to me. If your phone number was the same as your email and facebook (or whatever social network you use). It seems to me, though, you are actually making the case for numerics when you say "Chinese people pay a premium for 'lucky' phone numbers and license plates." -- because, exactly that. They've paid for their "identity" in this 200 year old technology -- did Bell ever picture that people would have phone numbers and even more that people in China would pay extra money for the specific number pattern their phone number had? Indeed... They'll also pay for premium online presence numerics as they progress forward (quickly) from that 200 year old tech into more modern times -- namely the times of the universally owned and immune from China's government: .com

At the same time, I don't expect them to all be used. And it was just recently that I realized one of the better ways to explain my theory on "longer" numerics (and 'longer' short L) as a currency is to consider that each is a unique serial number -- and it can be bought, sold, traded or used, while being limited in quantity based on length and quality. If people who like numbers could pick the serial numbers on their hundred dollar bills, they'd like pick them with a lot of 8's.

I could give you all sorts of neat theories. If BitCoin or cyber currencies go more mainstream, perhaps you point your 99888880.com domain to be your receiving wallet... and just like wanting to have a prestigious phone number or license plate, you want a "i'm the man" kinda of numeric.com. Out of 1,300,000,000 people, you've got a rare and limited five 8's name. You have to separate something like 99888880 from the likes of 31040695 --- follow from that to see there are NOT 100 million 8N people will "strive" to own; CHIPs top out at 16 million... and you can easily find smaller niches and numeric patterns that will be well sought after in 8N or 9N over a 7N like 3104065.

So, you could actually have a mix of BOTH people who invest in these and people who use them.

All that said, sure, absolutely... it's entirely possible there's a bubble in numerics. It's entirely possible after all is said and done, domains are just domains used for accessing the top 100 websites. ;) But it's just as likely that domains are growing in their role, rather than decreasing in it. Whether that be as an as yet un-regulated economy or true investment in a future of digital presences.


As for why pick up all the drops... The simplest answer I can think of is lack of originality and/or knowledge of how to script a search for available names. The drop lists are pre-created lists for miners. No thinking. Take the list and drop it into one of the handful of desktop drop catchers (where you don't pay anything more than the reg fee because you're just auto-registering without any auction competition). And from there if "someone" thought it was valuable over one of the existing hand-reg'able dotcoms, then perhaps it is. Do that en-masse in a market you think will accelerate in the future and you're bound to have more winners than losers. In theory, at least.
 
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21x20

Domainer Since '95 #oldschool #orjustoldTop Contributor
Impact
835
For the record...

China has 7,135,000 millionaires in 2014. Didn't re-search to see if there was an update in 2015.
http://time.com/2852740/china-millionaires/

But at that rate, the supply of 8N would be a mere 2 CHIPs for each millionaire in the country... While again acknowledging there's a huge difference between 88283868 and 25896321 even though both are technically CHIPs.
 
Impact
753
OK, what to say now???

There is NO expired 7N.coms (chips neither non chips) on ExpiredDomains.net. If you check catched domains on the same site you will see that each day all expired 7N.coms are caught. I track them for some time. About a month or two ago there was 10+ pages of expired 7N.coms. This number getting lower each few days and yesterday it was only one page with only few domains. Today there is no expired 7N.coms on ExpiredDomains.net!

Moreover, all expired 8N.coms and 9N.coms are caught each day too!
Please go to ExpiredDomains.net, use filters, and check by yourself.

Who is behind this and why?! Someone registering 9N.coms with "0" an "4" without any pattern the same day when it expire. I don't see any reason for that. You?

I would understand if this is the case only with 7N.coms, but cant understand why are 8N.com and 9N.coms are included.

If anyone plan to register all 7N.coms, 8N.coms and 9N.com he/they would need billions of dollars.
7N.coms = 10 million combinations
8N.coms = 100 million combinations
9N.coms = 1 billion combinations
Total: 1 billion and 110 million combinations = around 9 billion dollars for registrations needed

There are around one million (or slightly more) chip 7N.coms still available, but all expired 7N.coms (including non chips) getting registered the same day when they expire. At least according to ExpiredDomains.net.

Am I missing something? Is this some error? Please share your opinions as this looks insane to me.
 

Abdullah Abdullah

Top Contributor
Impact
4,140
Unified identity would seem to be the most obvious reason to me. If your phone number was the same as your email and facebook (or whatever social network you use). It seems to me, though, you are actually making the case for numerics when you say "Chinese people pay a premium for 'lucky' phone numbers and license plates." -- because, exactly that. They've paid for their "identity" in this 200 year old technology -- did Bell ever picture that people would have phone numbers and even more that people in China would pay extra money for the specific number pattern their phone number had? Indeed... They'll also pay for premium online presence numerics as they progress forward (quickly) from that 200 year old tech into more modern times -- namely the times of the universally owned and immune from China's government: .com

At the same time, I don't expect them to all be used. And it was just recently that I realized one of the better ways to explain my theory on "longer" numerics (and 'longer' short L) as a currency is to consider that each is a unique serial number -- and it can be bought, sold, traded or used, while being limited in quantity based on length and quality. If people who like numbers could pick the serial numbers on their hundred dollar bills, they'd like pick them with a lot of 8's.

I could give you all sorts of neat theories. If BitCoin or cyber currencies go more mainstream, perhaps you point your 99888880.com domain to be your receiving wallet... and just like wanting to have a prestigious phone number or license plate, you want a "i'm the man" kinda of numeric.com. Out of 1,300,000,000 people, you've got a rare and limited five 8's name. You have to separate something like 99888880 from the likes of 31040695 --- follow from that to see there are NOT 100 million 8N people will "strive" to own; CHIPs top out at 16 million... and you can easily find smaller niches and numeric patterns that will be well sought after in 8N or 9N over a 7N like 3104065.

So, you could actually have a mix of BOTH people who invest in these and people who use them.

All that said, sure, absolutely... it's entirely possible there's a bubble in numerics. It's entirely possible after all is said and done, domains are just domains used for accessing the top 100 websites. ;) But it's just as likely that domains are growing in their role, rather than decreasing in it. Whether that be as an as yet un-regulated economy or true investment in a future of digital presences.


As for why pick up all the drops... The simplest answer I can think of is lack of originality and/or knowledge of how to script a search for available names. The drop lists are pre-created lists for miners. No thinking. Take the list and drop it into one of the handful of desktop drop catchers (where you don't pay anything more than the reg fee because you're just auto-registering without any auction competition). And from there if "someone" thought it was valuable over one of the existing hand-reg'able dotcoms, then perhaps it is. Do that en-masse in a market you think will accelerate in the future and you're bound to have more winners than losers. In theory, at least.


Fantastic answer and explanation. You need people like 21x20 in orddr for those numeric hating people to understand this market :)