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discuss Why Do So Many Sold Names Not Resolve to Buyer Long After Sale?

Dynadot
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Have you ever noticed how sold names often take a very long time to resolve or be used by the buyer? I have seen some which allegedly sold for as much as well into 6-figures but still not working after 2 or 3 years!

So today as an experiment RANDOMLY selected 20 names listed as sold on the latest dnjournal.com report and typed-in the URLs. Out of 20 domains I was surprised to see 19 did not resolve to the buyer, with most still going to its old parked page, or to its past for sale page, or a browser error page.

How is that possible? These 20 names sold for 4, 5 or 6 figures but the buyers are in no hurry at all to get the domain resolving by forwarding to their other website, to a coming-soon page, or whatever. Making it more odd to me is when buying/reg'ing myself I get it working right away, usually on day-1.
 
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If you go to top sales of all time in multi million dollars you will find many are still not used, for example dudu.com was sold for $1 million at Sedo but it does not resolve.

Apart from abandoned projects and unfinished websites, maybe some of reported top sales were never actually completed.
 
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29,318
Thanks for the analysis @namemarket and I am not surprised. In this case, perhaps, it is not that surprising since they were recently acquired. But even if you repeat with long sold names, a surprisingly high percentage seem totally unused.

In some cases there are good reasons such as...
  1. They were purchased for some future aspect of the business which is still under development.
  2. They were purchased for a specific use in the future (e.g. what seems to be a phrase might be for a forthcoming movie or book or advertising campaign, well in the works, but not release ready).
  3. The purchaser is undergoing financial problems and unable to proceed.
  4. They were purchased for defensive reasons, and the plan was never to use them.
  5. They were purchased as an early stage of a major naming just to keep the options open.
  6. The plan was that they would be used as a digital asset investment, and monetized or resold in future.
There are of course other reasons, such as a means of effectively transferring cash and digital assets between two companies that are not truly independent in terms of ownership.

Whatever the reason, I think it extends across TLDs and across price levels. It is worrying to me, because if domains really are so valuable, why do so many go unused for so long?

Thanks for your research.

Bob
 
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Impact
963
If you go to top sales of all time in multi million dollars you will find many are still not used, for example dudu.com was sold for $1 million at Sedo but it does not resolve. Apart from abandoned projects and unfinished websites, maybe some of reported top sales were never actually completed.

There's a big widely reported and talked about mid 6 figure crypto name sale from 2 or 3 years ago allegedly sold by Mike Mann which still goes to the sellers page, last time I checked. Very strange to say the least. P.S. I highlighted the above, not OP.

Even if a non-complete website is it, why not at an absolute minimum send it to a coming soon page, another site buyer runs, etc?
 
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biix