NameSilo

WhoaDomain.com SOLD HANDREG BullionBlocks.com for $8,000

Labeled as information in Domain Selling and Domain Sales, started by WhoaDomain.com, Sep 13, 2020

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  1. WhoaDomain.com

    WhoaDomain.com WhoaDomain.com VIP Gold Account

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    hate to drag this further but I just realized and forgot to mention.

    BullionBlocks.com being of the pattern Bullion + Keyword.com makes BullionBlocks.com the highest domain ever for the pattern. It even beat a single dictionary word "Bullion" in .co.

    Imagine that? a longer two word .com beat a single dictionary word .co .

    Domain Price Date Venue
    bullion.co 3,001 USD 2018-08-24 GoDaddy
    bulliondirect.com 3,000 USD 2018-07-10 GoDaddy
    bullionbank.com 2,650 USD 2017-09-12 DropCatch
    bullion.com.au 1,590 USD 2010-11-06 Drop.com.au
    bullioninvestments.com 665 USD 2020-08-13 GoDaddy
    bullionnow.com 665 USD 2020-05-21 GoDaddy
    bullionmart.com 654 USD 2019-03-16 GoDaddy
    bullion.tv 409 USD 2007-11-18 Sedo
    bullionbullscanada.com 395 USD 2020-02-10 GoDaddy
    bullion.co 363 USD 2015-08-28 GoDaddy
    Same with CoinMena.com being the highest "MENA" domain ever sold.

    Strange how both are not listed on Namebio @Michael :xf.grin::xf.wink:

    Want to make sales like this? I'm not greedy. Come buy my domains. selling them wholesale. Flip for profit.

    I'm easy to reach and very accessible.

    I think I've proven that I reg good domains that people want .....(eventually :xf.wink:)

    So why not make me an offer? $100 here $500 there. $1000 here $5,000 there.

    come see if we can make a deal. I can leave plenty of meat on the bone for a flip.

    Like buy for $1,000 flip for $8,000?

    This happens all the time on Namepros! You know it!

    That's right. I'm going in HARDCORE right now.

    If this sale is any indicator of the quality of my domain regs. My domains are literally GOLD (Bullion) :ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL:

    hehe Cocky SOB let me stop. (Apologies) I welcome all offers. let's have a private message chat. Talk soon Namepros!
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
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  2. zomainhacks

    zomainhacks Upgraded Member Blue Account

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    Here we discuss domains, similar opportunities might arise for other domains. It's not doing gossip,it is asking the opinion of fellow mebers of this forum about that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
  3. zomainhacks

    zomainhacks Upgraded Member Blue Account

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    Winning a scratch card doesn't make rational buying the other scratch cards for more of the standard price.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
  4. WhoaDomain.com

    WhoaDomain.com WhoaDomain.com VIP Gold Account

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    And yet other people buy other people's domains on here base on past comparable domain sales.

    So I would need to sell 1000 $8000 domains to be considered "the guy to buy wholesale domains from"

    That right? There's obvious flaws there.
    1.If I ever make 1000 domain sales a $8,000 a piece that means I have $8 millions bucks which means I have renewal money. I wouldn't be selling whole sale then.

    2. If I sold 1000 domains at $8,000 a piece then that 1000 domains a piece could have been YOUR $8,000 sale. Had you bought it from for $200 or $500 or even $1000 wholesale.

    Also your scratch card analog is flawed too.

    People lose on scratch cards every minute. It never stops the next guy from buying one now does it?

    The next guy always thinks it's a good idea to buy one knowing full well he will lose probably.

    Ultimately it's up the the buyer. Who are you or I to stop them?

    People who take risks have the chance to win.
    Everyday of our lives we lose because of inaction due to fear of losing.
    We accept risk because it's our only chance to win big sometimes.

    And yes we could lose. We accept that risk as grown people.
     
  5. WhoaDomain.com

    WhoaDomain.com WhoaDomain.com VIP Gold Account

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    Just randomly did a check on BullionBlocks.com and looks like a beautiful website.

    you see this is exactly why when a broker is hired. you have to assume big money is knocking on your door and trust your instincts not to sell.

    but then again the buyer could go with a much cheaper option. There is that.

    The problem here are people who have no clue what they have and are selling their domains for too too cheap. And are so happy when they sell for $1000 or $2000. It really brings down quality domain name sell prices.

    If domainers did not religiously sell domains in the $1000-$5000 sweet spot many of us could sell our domains for $10,000 - $50,000.

    $8,000 was good money for this domain. I am happy. but would love to see in the comments below an answer to these questions.

    (I have no regrets believe me.)

    but I love sparking discussions.

    so..............

    1. Could I have sold this domain for more than $8,000?
    2. Should I have held out for more and just waited?
    3. Should you price your domain more because a broker was hired to buy your domain?

    I have to admit. You have to have GUTS in domaining. I admire those who hold out for big money even though the data does not justify it.

    Thoughts?
     
  6. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    That's something that's really hard to answer.

    Siips(.)com Story

    Last summer I had a company contact me about siips(.)com. When I saw that it was the Dairy Farmers of America, with over $13 Billion per year in revenue, my first thought was that I really screwed up with pricing the domain at $14,500. Someone from their IT department was doing the negotiations (not a good sign) and they said it was not in their budget and asked if we could give a discount. I didn't give a discount, and they decided on using siipsmilk.com.

    Results of Them Not Going with siips(.)com

    The traffic increase that siip(.)com received just 1 month after their launch is below.

    Before their launch, we only received 8 visitors per week to siips(.)com.

    One month after their launch, we received 94 visitors per week to siips(.)com. It is probably much higher now.

    That's a 1075% increase and after just 1 month they'd be losing up to 4,888 customers per year. These are all customers looking for Siips Milk, but can't find it because they bought the wrong domain name.

    Starbucks determined that the lifetime value of each of their customers is $14,099. If this company's customers have a lifetime value of just $500, and 20% don't bother to keep looking for the real site, then they are losing $8,600 in value per week. If it's 30% or 40% that stops looking, this number increases.

    upload_2021-2-22_14-7-8.png

    But no matter what calculation you use for this situation, the answer always shows it was a bad decision not to buy the right domain at the right time.

    Figuring Out How to Negotiate Domains

    In regards to your question, in relation to the siips(.)com story above, you never know how high a customer has set their RV (reservation value - aka...walkaway point). The reason you can't figure this out is because it often has to do with much more than the size of their pockets. It has to do with talking to the right person, and that person has to be a believer, or at least able to see the value in choosing the right domain. I've sent the stats above to people at various levels in the company, and all seem to be oblivious to any shortcomings that are resulting from this, even if you give them all the information. So in my experience, there are believers (in domains...and logic) and non-believers (who only see what is in front of them). Converting a true non-believer into a believer is a difficult thing to do. So with siips(.)com, I'll wait until the traffic leak is 10 times what is was back at the beginning and see if they are interested in talking.

    This is the key that a lot of us should transition towards. In my experience, if you have "Lease-to-Own" as an option on your landing page, your overall sales revenue will not be affected if you bump your prices up. Because someone that is going to put up $2,500 in cash, will often make payments on a $7,500 or $10,000 domain if the domain is important to their plans.

    An interesting phenomenon I've seen, is before the pandemic year, I significantly increased the prices on about half (estimate) of my domains.

    In the 12 months from March 2019 to March 2020, my sales stayed the same at around $130+k for the 12 months, but I only sold 27 domains, rather than 65+ domains.

    I think eventually it'll be to the point where maybe half of my domains are Price Upon Request and the other half of my domains are at $5,000-$30,000 with lease-to-own options. Because if I'm at only 27 sales per year now out of 7,000+ domains, then I don't mind bringing the cost up and the sales quantity down a little lower to see what will happen.

    DotComAgency.com as an Example

    If I look back at dotcomagency.com, they had $2,000 and under prices in their early days. Then in the early 2000s their minimum price jumped to $5,000 on their lowest quality domains. I suspect that was better for them as they eventually sold their portfolio to GoDaddy in 2016.

    https://www.namepros.com/threads/go...io-dotcomagency-com-traffic-names-ltd.989222/

    upload_2021-2-22_13-54-39.png
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
  7. blogspotter

    blogspotter Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    The Big flaws in the traffic lead assumption are:

    1) Thinking that every visitor is a customer. You need to see their overall conversion rate for type in customers

    2) Thinking just because they landed on SIIPS(.)com , SIIPSMILK lost a customer. Many people who type in into the browser into a site most probably know about that website and when they see a lander or a sedo parking, they will go back and find the right website. Maybe not all, but a significant percent.

    Not saying traffic leak is insignificant, but the assumptions need to be more accurate if we are to use it as a sales point.
     
  8. topdom

    topdom Top Contributor VIP

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    I have a .com domain which receives about 1000 visits per day according to sedo. "They" have .eu and they waste their homepage by shouting "we are .EU", but they are not interested in paying even 3 figures for that domain (they don't even bother saying we are not interested). People don't buy because they don't buy. They lose money and its their choice. Nothing can be done about it.
    ....
    8K for B..B.. is great. Noone else would buy it, and they didn't have to buy it either.
    WhoaDomain sells domains for 5 figures, which I wouldn't bother handregging. Maybe he should become a broker.
     
  9. blogspotter

    blogspotter Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Totally. Looks like he is a great salesman and negotiator.

    Domaining for most of us more about buy right and let the buyer knock and if possible click BIN.
    And get paid without hassle. Happy to pay 15-30% on every sale

    But if one is a great salesmen and enjoys a good negotiation, they could do extremely well as brokers for all the decent names the are begging to be brokered.
     
  10. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I see what you are saying, but I never said every visitor was a customer nor did I imply that none of those that land on siips(.)com would venture on to siipsmilk(.)com. Based on your statements 1 & 2 above, if true, my calculation would have been 86 customers per week * $500 per customer, which would equal $43,000. This was not my calculation.

    I reported 20% of this value. I'll let them figure out the rest. No CEO is going to read through my "conversion estimates" anyway. If you are an outsider contacting someone at a company in upper management, you are already getting minimal time and minimal consideration.

    I was implying that if they are leaking 344 people per month (1 month after launch), these are people that have taken the time to type in siips(.)com into their browser. The conversion rate of these people, in my belief is not going to be the typical 1-2% that normally convert anyway. When is the last time any of us have typed in a grocery store product website. I can't remember the last time I did. So I'd suppose the interest level of these visitors are much higher than normal.

    Maybe my number of 20% is completely off. Maybe it is 5%, maybe it is 35%. Maybe the majority of these types of visitors for them are buyers for big distributors, school districts, or markets. My intention is to present them with a simple calculation and let them figure it out based on their own numbers. I offer them the actual traffic so they can find out for themselves, so it really doesn't matter how accurate I am because they can evaluate the details from real traffic. I'm not going to slice and dice my numbers down to the lowest possible amount, then multiply it by their product that sells for $5. If they are losing just one store sale or distributor sale per month in this lost traffic, that can override any estimates we make.

    So I'll go into negotiations with my estimate of $8,600 per week being their value, and maybe they find that this will get them 1-2 more markets or distributors per month and that equals $xx,xxx for them, maybe it equals $xxx per week for them. But I'm not going to show them low cards in a negotiation because they won't show me their high cards.

    There are tons of numbers we can simulate for them. Are we then going to add in exponential numbers that "would have" occurred in public and dark social media sharing for those that get it wrong when passing the domain info to others via phone, email, or text message, or instant message?

    [​IMG]


    I prefer to keep it simple and realize they might find more value in the numbers than we ever can with made up estimates.


    Direct Traffic is estimated to be 55% of all website traffic. For all the other traffic, inevitably there will be some social media, and news articles that refer to the better domain as well by mistake.

    upload_2021-2-23_0-36-4.png




    Statista also found that Direct Visitors are the "Gold Standard" for news websites, so what are the rates for commercial products? The Direct Visitors are the ones that end up on the better domain.

    upload_2021-2-23_0-36-49.png


    SitePlug.com, which should have more data than any of us, reports that 30% of customers click on a competitor once they go to the wrong domain and then use a search engine to find the right website. So if we are using my estimate that 80% of visitors continue on to looking for the correct site after landing on the wrong domain, then 30% of this 80% is then again lost to other competitors in the search engine. So they are only recovering about 56% of their lost traffic based on conservative numbers. Any way you look at it, these sites typically lose 15%-30+% of their Direct Traffic to the better domain. So if they are only recovering 56% of their lost traffic, and their lost traffic is 15% - 30+% of their total website traffic, it is a large problem, but again one that I will not try to prove in a message to a CEO all at once.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021
  11. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    And really my intention isn't to get them to believe my exact number, it is to get them to at least engage and come to the realization that they are having actual human potential customers type in the wrong address every day.

    Once they do that, then the conversation becomes real. If this is 10,000 or 20,000 of their best traffic going to the wrong place, what is it that they pay per click for customers on Google? Sometimes this is $1-$10+ per click. So besides their lifetime value per customer that may be in jeopardy, they realize there is also a cost-per-click cost association that they are also losing at the same time.


    upload_2021-2-23_1-34-55.png
     

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