What are the ways that end-users use purchased domains?

Discussion in 'Domain Beginners' started by Emil K., Jun 16, 2017.

Replies:
7
Views:
602

  1. Emil K.

    Emil K. Established Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Posts:
    31
    Likes Received:
    13
    Some of the businessmen occasionally give big money for some domain names.

    It would be interesting to know how they use them, bearing in mind that most of them retains the domain names under which are their sites.
     
    The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
  2. Emil K.

    Emil K. Established Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Posts:
    31
    Likes Received:
    13
    I asked this because a few days ago one of the prospects repluying to mu offer: "Thanks but I have my own domain name and website with which I am satisfied. Why should I buy your domain?"
    What would you answer?
    I've got an impression the most prospects think in a similar way.
    I consider this is one of the potential core topics for discussion.
     
  3. SpareDomains

    SpareDomains Jay VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Posts:
    3,334
    Likes Received:
    2,020
    When your emailing someone it's basically a cold lead or the equivalent of door to door sales as they didn't get off the couch to come and look for your domain so everything is on you...

    1)Domain needs to be better than the one their currently using
    2)You might have to sell them on the idea of needing the domain
    3)You generally need to price the domain at an attractive price meaning not maximum ROI

    When a buyer submits an inquiry to you first now you have a hot lead as it's already confirmed they want the domain so you don't have to sell the idea of buying the domain to them it's already established they wan't it so all that remains is seeing if your pricing aligns to make it happen.

    1)Buy the best domains you can find as domain quality is #1 factor to success
    2)Get them listed on sales pages
    3)Enter them in distribution networks Afternic, Sedo etc...
    4)Passively wait for inbound inquiries or "hot" leads

    Both models can work but sales closure rate and ROI will be higher on someone that knocked on your door first so I think instead of emailing 100's of people time could be better spent focusing on 1-3 above. If domain quality is there combined with distribution to get your names seen you generally don't have to beat down doors to try and sell something end users come to you. Emailing people all day long to make sales is a job. Can spend way less time doing 1-3 above and live your life and just respond to inquiries. I've sold many $8 expired .coms in the last 14 years for 1-7.5k. One this week for 3k and all I ever do is buy good expired $8 .coms that make business sense, toss them on a sales page, enter them Afternic, Sedo, etc... so very minimal time investment from my end, sometimes I feel guilty about it as basically free money as no $8 stock share has ever brought me the same return. :ROFL: If the passive approach doesn't work then the question might not be do I need to email people the question might be do I need a second opinion on the quality of my domains as I might be labeling turds as gems.

    Quality+Distribution+Negotiating Skills=Success
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
  4. Emil K.

    Emil K. Established Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Posts:
    31
    Likes Received:
    13

    OK, the suggestion seems interesting.

    But how can I, as the beginner in this business, among the thousands of expired or deleted domains on the list recognize at first sight, one that has commercial potential?

    In addition, many say the list of closeout domain names before they find themselves on the public list for sale are largely 'plucked' so that practically nothing is left that is worth. How in that sediment to find something worthwhile and by what criteria?


    I apologize for perhaps foolish and naive questions, but I am a beginner who is hungry for knowledge.

    Thanks for your understanding.

    Emil.
     
  5. Kate

    Kate Thinking inside the Box™ VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2005
    Posts:
    18,519
    Likes Received:
    15,665
    Maybe start with names that make sense to you, that belong to niches you are familiar with. If you can't see a clear purpose for the domain, it's unlikely that somebody else will. It's also a question of research and experience. If you follow the market and analyze reported sales, you'll learn what kinds of domains are in demand and what industries/trends are popular.
     
  6. Emil K.

    Emil K. Established Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Posts:
    31
    Likes Received:
    13
    Thanks Jay,

    This is a very good advice in general, but not for me at this time.

    Unfortunately, I am in situation where every three days I must to buy a new domain and immediately offer it for sale via emails.

    Setting up domains on sales pages and waiting for 3-6-9 months for someone respond to an offer for me is a luxury.

    But I still do not know the answer to my question about what new owners are doing with purchased domains.
    To simplify the situation, here is a concrete example. The guy has a site under the domain: SmithsFurnitureStore.com. He is very pleased with his domain and website, but would to improve his visibility on the Net, and hence the number of potential customers for the goods he offers. You appear with an offer to him to buy your domain: BostonFurnitureStore.com at a very affordable price. Bearing in mind that his store is located in Boston, he buys that domain. Soon after that, I also appear with my offer to buy my domain BestFurnitureBrands.com which has 3,600 exactly match searches per month on Google.The price is affordable (a couple of hundred dollars), so he buys that domain too.

    The question is what will Mr. Smith do with two new domains he bought, assuming no one of them will not replace the existing domain under which his site is located?

    Forwarding both domains to main website does not make sense, I guess you agree? What else is left? - that is the question.

    And we, as domainers, need to know the answer.

    Imagine yourself as a freezer seller. You're inducing a customer to buy a freezer (although you know he already has one at home). You must always have a ready answer to his question: "I have a functional freezer, why should I buy other one?"

    If you don't know the answer to this question (it seeams nobody knew it so far), please send me address (link) of someone who knows. Thanks.

    Best regards,

    Emil
     
  7. maksimfa

    maksimfa Active Member VIP Trusted Contest Holder

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2012
    Posts:
    820
    Likes Received:
    712
    @Emil K.

    Depends on how married the end user is to their domain.

    Best case, they can develop under the new domain and it would work for them.

    Alternatives are,
    1. They use the new domain as a sales/lead page for their business. Gives them ability to experiment without crapping up their page.
    2. Insurance.... Insurance that a competitor is not going to sneak in and develop a business under that domain.
     
  8. SpareDomains

    SpareDomains Jay VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Posts:
    3,334
    Likes Received:
    2,020
    End users use domains in various ways...

    1) Buy a domain and launch their website on it
    2) Upgrade their domain to a better one and rebrand as they might not have had the budget on startup but after some profits have been made might not mind dropping a few k on what they couldn't afford in the beginning
    3) Redirecting domains either to their homepage or category specific pages or items, If they sell 5-10 categories or products and they can afford any of those 5-10 category killer generic keyword domains redirection to internal pages of their site doesn't hurt although making a category specific sales lander for the new domain with a link in to their site would be better
    5) Locking them up so their competitors can't buy them
    6) Advertising campaigns, in affiliate marketing you would generally add an id to your url like sid=Google sid=Bing etc... so you can track all advertising buys to see where the sales originated from and then adjust your advertising budget to what is working and eliminate or decrease what isn't working as well. Advertising without any form of tracking and ya might as well open the window and throw your money out of it. Reason you see different coupon codes for the same deals it's not about having 10 different codes it's about knowing where those sales came from so you use a unique code for different advertising sources. Some might take it a step farther especially in print advertising as instead of using unique coupon codes that may or may not get entered they use a handful of unique urls. URL 1 gets advertised in magazine A, URL 2 gets advertised in magazine B etc... Internet advertising is easier as it's all trackable, print not so much so it leaves it open to unique coupon codes, unique urls etc... unless QR code ever sticks well where ya could just affiliate tag the code.
    etc....
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2017

Want to reply or ask your own question?

It only takes a minute to sign up – and it's free!

Share This Page

Loading...