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information The State of the Industry 2024: 36 Experts Reflect on the Past Year and Predict What's Ahead For Us Now

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It's here! DNJournal's 20th Annual State of the Industry Cover Story. DNJ was launched on New Year's Day 2003. A year later the domain industry news magazine started the annual State of the Industry Cover Stories with experts from all corners of the industry commenting on what they saw as the highs and lows of the past year, as well as what they were expecting in the year ahead. I wanted this 20th annual edition to be the biggest one we have ever done and that challenge was met thanks to three dozen industry leaders who responded to our interview requests. If you are serious about the domain business, this is one you won't want to miss:
https://www.dnjournal.com/cover/2024/january.htm
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
Anyone buying other than .com is making a mistake.

Big words from a small mind.
 
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Big words from a small mind.

While the statement is broad, it is mostly correct.

.com is the gold standard of the domain name hierarchy. While other extensions have worth, they are in many ways inferior to .com

We use copper for wiring and in making pennies and it is the same for tin, aluminum, and other metals, but we don’t use gold for common wiring and no longer mint gold coins for public currency because it is usually stored in a safe deposit box. I don’t believe Fort Knox has silver, copper, or tin stored there.

.com as an extension is the most valuable. I’m not knocking other extensions. Just stating the obvious.
 
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I bought a non-com domain name for $24 and sold it 6 months later for $200,000

That's all I have to say.
 
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I bought a non-com domain name for $24 and sold it 6 months later for $200,000

That's all I have to say.
This guy purchased a painting for 5 bucks and discovered it was worth a million. Another guy purchased a lotto ticket for 1 dollar and won 100 million.

Almost every domain investors buy, regardless of the extension, will never sell even if they are really good names. The .com extension has the highest chance of selling and that is also risky.
 
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This guy purchased a painting for 5 bucks and discovered it was worth a million. Another guy purchased a lotto ticket for 1 dollar and won 100 million.

It was definitely not a random choice that depended 100% on chance.

I intentionally chose an SLD that I knew would be of great value quickly, then I dug deep and found a gem that others had dismissed as a "mistake". In addition, I have the talent and courage to manage to raise a low 5-figure offer to $200,000

I believe that generalizing everything by saying big words like "This one is good, the others are crap!" is not right or healthy in any field.

Stay hungry.
Stay foolish.
 
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I bought a non-com domain name for $24 and sold it 6 months later for $200,000

That's all I have to say.
That’s great! No doubt anyone can win in Vegas but it’s not the place I’d ever do business nor depend on making a living. An industry is built on consumer confidence, not luck. Make the same sale on the same extension in multiples over long periods of time and then that extension will become a more trusted investment. We need tends, not bubbles.

I would be interested in knowing the name you sold, unless you want to stay anonymous.
 
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I believe that generalizing everything by saying big words like "This one is good, the others are crap!" is not right or healthy in any field.
What I posted is the truth. Sometimes hearing the truth is not "right" or "healthy" for people that fear it.
 
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I intentionally chose an SLD that I knew would be of great value quickly, then I dug deep and found a gem that others had dismissed as a "mistake". In addition, I have the talent and courage to manage to raise a low 5-figure offer to $200,000

Even after this explanation, the fact that you continue to talk about luck, vegas, lotto and still refuse to accept the truth is just proof of how closed your perception is and how old-fashioned you are towards innovations.

I am aware of what I am doing and I am happy with the sweet numbers I see in my bank account. I don't have the time or energy to deal with the narrow views of those who consider themselves authorities in the industry.
 
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I bought a non-com domain name for $24 and sold it 6 months later for $200,000

That's all I have to say.
Pics or it didn't happen. :xf.wink:
 
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Congrats to the Domain Knight. :ROFL: :xf.cool:
 
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Pics or it didn't happen. :xf.wink:

I do not have to prove anything to anyone. But I'll just give this clue and you'll get the idea: " m - e - t - a "

I'm a domain name investor which means I invest in domain names. I'm not fanatic of anything to stick with any particular idea. I see an opportunity, and I invest in. I also have a couple sales with ccTLDs which are still not a dot-com.

More outer and wider example would be TOP.DOMAINS - They're doing great job keeping a wide range of ngTLDs and doing wonderful sales occasionally.

So if all these data in front of people's very eyes are still not enough and they claim this strategies are "mistake", all I can say is that I do not give f*ck at all.
 
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Every name is judged on it's own merit. Nobody hands you 5 figures just because it is a .com

It's very hard to deny that names with a complimentary .gTLD can be worth more than their .com counterpart.

But again, judging a single name for it's net worth. I don't sell TLD's, I sell names.

If you are only going to follow one TLD as a rule, it probably should be .com as an investment tool anyway.
It is not to suggest there is no value in anything else. And the time it may take to realize that.

But to the point of this thread,
I still believe in the idea that the domain market is closely tied to the NASDAQ.
This is especially true if you often sell to investors over end users.
Sometimes the stock market creates 'the wealth effect' where investors take more risks.

So I think the stock market has been holding fairly steady. But the world is full of turmoil.
Good thing our index lags the stock market by about 6 months. You have some warning if you choose to accept the idea.

If you didn't do well in the past year, you likely will not do much better this year.
That I say in the idea that you have a mindset for this or you do not.
Only you can change your trajectory.
 
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I thank the various contributors for taking the time to respond in such detail and clarity. It is wonderful to have so many perspectives. Thank you very much @Ron Jackson for putting this together each year.

-Bob
 
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I do not have to prove anything to anyone. But I'll just give this clue and you'll get the idea: " m - e - t - a "

I'm a domain name investor which means I invest in domain names. I'm not fanatic of anything to stick with any particular idea. I see an opportunity, and I invest in. I also have a couple sales with ccTLDs which are still not a dot-com.

More outer and wider example would be TOP.DOMAINS - They're doing great job keeping a wide range of ngTLDs and doing wonderful sales occasionally.

So if all these data in front of people's very eyes are still not enough and they claim this strategies are "mistake", all I can say is that I do not give f*ck at all.
I’m a pretty open minded guy. But you’re bordering on the line of being a troll. The way you prove your points is by substantiating it with real live examples and putting your name on it. I almost let a $3.1 million sale go because the buyer insisted on an NDA. It mattered to me that I could prove what I was promoting and selling to others in this industry. Here’s a good example. Try it sometime.

https://www.dnjournal.com/cover/2014/february.htm
 
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But you’re bordering on the line of being a troll.
If you are still trying to label me as a "troll" despite all these live examples and data I have given, there is really nothing to discuss.

I never said .com is bad. My personal ROI rate on .com sales is much higher and I cannot deny this fact.

"Anyone buying other than .com is making a mistake."
I hear these types of sentences a lot from .com dinosaurs and I'm just saying that this approach is extremely arrogant and blinkered which I do not find it right at all.
 
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OK. We have to accept that the Kor sale was a perfect match of word plus extension, it wasn't a one-off, they happen all the time. How often do you see a word or term that has a Social bearing and think that wouldn't sit right with a dotcom'

We seem to be getting carried away with generalisations. For domain pros to be arguing about this just seems like we've gone back to kindergarten
 
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OK. We have to accept that the Kor sale was a perfect match of word plus extension, it wasn't a one-off, they happen all the time. How often do you see a word or term that has a Social bearing and think that wouldn't sit right with a dotcom'

We seem to be getting carried away with generalisations. For domain pros to be arguing about this just seems like we've gone back to kindergarten
I’m surely not arguing. I’m actually looking for constructive conversation and truth. The internet is a great place for innuendo, and no, I don’t have to accept anything as fact unless there is proof. That is why people easily get gamed in this medium. How many people have lost their hard earned money on made up stories, lies, from con artists. Prove it, put up the facts and stand behind those facts. Put your name on it. Then you will have a platform to stand on. There should be a price to pay, or rightful recognition for promoting something that may cost others hundreds of thousands of dollars. Take that risk, it will only cost you your reputation or it might help your reputation. Bite, don’t bark.

I’ve made a living solely off of .com for almost 30 years. The homes, boats, cars and raising kids were all from .com domain names. Yes, I get to call out stuff that smells really bad.

If you’re going to promote the next big thing, substantiate why you think it’s worth the risk. Don’t say I spent $24 on something and made $200k and everyone who questions it is stupid. You can believe it, but I won’t. This is not supposed to be like sitting at a slot machine. This domain name industry can’t survive as a book of fiction. The really big money investors really don’t care about stories, they want proof and hard copy.
 
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I don’t have to accept anything as fact unless there is proof.

Have you ever heard a website called namebio.com before?

You should check it sometimes. There are lots of awesome proofs!
 
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I'm fully onboard with you Michael Castello. I left this domain board for well over a year due to certain respected members endorsing new TLDS without a thread of evidence I called them out many times. Worse still these were not successful domain sellers just established domain talkers. One complained of Bullying. Fortunately they have since curtailed their exaggerated claims. I was spending too much time feeling angry.

My 'quoted' comments relate to a factual aspect of the market that we all know exists. Would I touch it, The new TLD's, or re-appropriated CCtlds . Not a chance. But, I don't go looking there either.

I don't see any need to call out individual sales as fact or fictitious, so long as they are not using that one sale to influence others that don't know better.
 
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I’m surely not arguing. I’m actually looking for constructive conversation and truth. The internet is a great place for innuendo, and no, I don’t have to accept anything as fact unless there is proof. That is why people easily get gamed in this medium. How many people have lost their hard earned money on made up stories, lies, from con artists. Prove it, put up the facts and stand behind those facts. Put your name on it. Then you will have a platform to stand on. There should be a price to pay, or rightful recognition for promoting something that may cost others hundreds of thousands of dollars. Take that risk, it will only cost you your reputation or it might help your reputation. Bite, don’t bark.

I’ve made a living solely off of .com for almost 30 years. The homes, boats, cars and raising kids were all from .com domain names. Yes, I get to call out stuff that smells really bad.

If you’re going to promote the next big thing, substantiate why you think it’s worth the risk. Don’t say I spent $24 on something and made $200k and everyone who questions it is stupid. You can believe it, but I won’t. This is not supposed to be like sitting at a slot machine. This domain name industry can’t survive as a book of fiction. The really big money investors really don’t care about stories, they want proof and hard copy.
I agree Michael in presenting info and facts. You also have to be honest there are many .com domain investors that don't ever share their info as well. It's great that you were going to walk away from a $3.1m sale if you could not report, I agree with that. I think most and I am talking about wealthy .com investors would not do that, so I think you should be applauded.

I think the other thing that always needs to be pointed out is because someone made a sale in any extension, it does not mean it's the thing to register domain names in for someone else. To that point .com is the best extension by a mile but many have lost money in .com domain names.

But seeing someone having success in a new gtld should not be a signal that it's the new hot thing or that it should be invested based on another person's success. Chad sold free.games for $335K https://namebio.com/free.games But that's a perfect what Mike Berkens always says to me a bang on name, where the First word goes perfectly with the second word. But people should not be going crazy to buy .games names. In new gtlds either someone got lucky early, or the registry made the sale like with Video.games for example.

I don't think someone saying I hand regged whatever.newgtld and sold it for $100K is promotion. Unless they say others should also go out and register them, etc... Someone being excited and selling a name should be celebrated as much as when someone celebrates you and David or Rick or Mike selling a .com for big money.

All domain investors especially those new to the game, should know each name and each sale are unique. Because someone sold DarkBlue.com for XXXXXXX does not equate to guaranteeing you will sell LightBlue.com for XXXXXX it's only one data point to help you in your analysis.

Good luck to everyone.
 
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I applaud anyone that makes a sale with any domain name or extension. I have no allegiance to any extension but I do believe there is a hierarchy that exists in the domain name system with .com at its pinnacle. It serves us all well to understand it. What irks me are those that judge others while incognito. The truth will serve us all well if we can prove that something works for not only ourselves, but for others. That is truly golden.
 
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I applaud anyone that makes a sale with any domain name or extension.

So, as a result, anyone who buys non-com is not making a mistake.

I'm glad we came to the same point after going around the subject thoroughly.
 
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So, as a result, anyone who buys non-com is not making a mistake.

I'm glad we came to the same point after going around the subject thoroughly.
Perhaps you should re-read my first post. I’m saying the exact same thing.
 
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