NameSilo

The LLLL.com sales and discussion thread

Located in "Short" Domain Discussion started by italiandragon, Aug 6, 2007.

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  1. frank-germany

    frank-germany domainer since 2001 / musician Gold Account VIP

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    my best "NO" sale took over a year to close at an equivalent of $148K USD

    what is a realistic BIN ?
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
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  2. Joseph CA

    Joseph CA Established Member

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    Do you mind sharing the domain? or PM
    Thanks
     
  3. frank-germany

    frank-germany domainer since 2001 / musician Gold Account VIP

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    yes I mind
    no sharing
     
  4. uzver

    uzver Established Member

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    You basically proved what I said above -- you should own great domains and then you can use your skills to negotiate. I simply don't own the domains that can be sold for 6 figures in normal circumstances. I've got very few good one-word .orgs that can possibly be sold for high 5 figure if I'm very lucky (as the owners of star.org were lucky to sell it for 225K to some crypto-related biz). But I'm not willing to wait for that magic moment and I just set it at a 50K BIN.

    Your sale price is sweet. That's why I started looking at CVCV (and similar) patterns. I realized that BOMA, SOLA or something may possibly fetch that price.

    Not applicable to what we discuss in this thread, I guess. I don't know a realistic bin for SOLA.com because it can be 25K, 250K or even seven figures as the sale of VIVO.com shows.

    But for something like interview//org (currently for sale at Flippa) one cannot ask 100K and expect it to sell in a foreseeable future. You can leave it at 10-20K and wait for a few years. I would say that 3 to 8K is a more realistic price for a domain like this. I took the example off the top of my head. I didn't make a research on a domain so I might as well be wrong. I didn't check how many extensions are developed. If .io and .co are for sale at 2K then it devalues .org even more (more choices).

    Anyways, I'm not arguing with you, Frank. But we're currently on the different levels in this game for various reasons. :xf.wink:
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
  5. NameAgency

    NameAgency Top Member PRO Gold Account VIP

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    Mark Levine just sold SOLA.io today for $3688 (seen on twitter)
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
  6. uzver

    uzver Established Member

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    Yep, I saw it too. Coincidence :xf.smile:

    P.S. You probably meant Levine
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
  7. NameAgency

    NameAgency Top Member PRO Gold Account VIP

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    Yes, Levine. Corrected. Thanks for the note.

    So, has this sale changed your mind about the price for sola.com?. Domain market changes every day.
     
  8. The Durfer

    The Durfer Upgraded Member Gold Account VIP

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  9. uzver

    uzver Established Member

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    Indeed, it does. And I increased the price for one of my CVCV .io domains :xf.wink:

    Yes, I think I'm getting a better understanding of its value. I checked SOLA companies on LinkedIn -- quite a few potential end-users as well.
     
  10. NameAgency

    NameAgency Top Member PRO Gold Account VIP

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    Sola.com currently belongs to Zeiss.

    This is the story of the domain and former owners, Sola international

    1956: A group of optical technicians in Adelaide, Australia, begin developing plastic lenses.
    1960: Sola is incorporated as Scientific Optical Laboratories of Australia.
    1979: Sola is acquired by Pilkington PLC.
    1993: AEA Investors acquires Sola from Pilkington.
    1995: Sola completes an initial public offering of stock.
    2001: In a partnership with Safilo USA, Sola introduces eyeglasses with curved lenses.
    2004: Carl Zeiss AGG and EQT Partners AB announce an agreement to acquire Sola.

    Good news: Is not in use, so it may be for sale.
    Bad news: Zeiss is a huge company.
     

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