Dan.com
NameSilo

LoveCatchyDomains

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Domain sellers are invited to post their completed sales on NamePro in that specific thread. The question is, though when is it OK to list them?
What if the the sale is through one of the large marketplaces, such as Afternic or Sedo? Getting permission from the buyer directly is not usually possible. I've asked customer service on each marketplace, and they didn't seem to have an issue with this. But if don't really know if the buyer is OK with it, do you proceed anyhow?
Likewise, if it is a private sale, unless there is a specific privacy agreement in the contract, do you go ahead a post without explicit permission? Did you ever get a buyer's"dander up" because you put the information up?
Feel free to share your insights, opinions, and experiences.
 
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cabotower

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if there is no nda (non disclosure agreement) in place then go ahead and report, after you have received payment.
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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domain sales Watch tag non disclosure agreement Watch tag completed sales Watch tag
if there is no nda (non disclosure agreement) in place then go ahead and report, after you have received payment.
Yes, that may be the legality. The question is whether the buyer really wants that information shared. And could it hurt future sales prospects?
For an end-user, the publicity for the future website might be helpful. On the other hand, a domain investor may not want the next potential buyer to know how little they actually paid for the domain, if they are asking for a high price.
 
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cabotower

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Yes, that may be the legality. The question is whether the buyer really wants that information shared. And could it hurt future sales prospects?
For an end-user, the publicity for the future website might be helpful. On the other hand, a domain investor may not want the next potential buyer to know how little they actually paid for the domain, if they are asking for a high price.
no nda, share the sale. i wouldn't worry about it.
 

karmaco

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Its a personal choice to report sales and a well known fact most sales go unreported.

The super annoying and useless ones are on Twitter “I sold a domain for XXXX but I can’t tell you the name or any details. I wasn’t hugged enough as a child and just need to brag and get pats on the back”

These kind of unverifiable and easily faked “reports” should be ignored. They contribute nothing to the community.
 
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VadimK

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I wouldn't worry about the abstract buyer's ''maybe non-wishing'', unless DNA was signed or his clear wish expressed in words.
Because on the other side of the scale is the simple fact that you do help lots of people with reporting the sales, as there are bunch of folks here (me included) who do analyze them, putting them into certain metrics, comparing to their own, researching new niches because of it, etc.
 

karmaco

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I wouldn't worry about the abstract buyer's ''maybe non-wishing'', unless DNA was signed or his clear wish expressed in words.
Because on the other side of the scale is the simple fact that you do help lots of people with reporting the sales, as there are bunch of folks here (me included) who do analyze them, putting them into certain metrics, comparing to their own, researching new niches because of it, etc.
I agree. Unless the buyer requests you sign NDA (never happens except high value high dollar sales) there is nothing wrong with reporting the facts to the community if you are comfortable doing so.

There are plenty of reasons not to report most stemming from other domainers. I know some friends who report with a delay like 1 to 6 months post sale.

DAN is the only platform, that I am aware, that asks you and your buyer to specify if the sale should be kept private.
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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DAN is the only platform, that I am aware, that asks you and your buyer to specify if the sale should be kept private.
That's good to know, that at least one marketplace provides a guideline for sale privacy.
 
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I agree. Unless the buyer requests you sign NDA (never happens except high value high dollar sales) there is nothing wrong with reporting the facts to the community if you are comfortable doing so.

There are plenty of reasons not to report most stemming from other domainers. I know some friends who report with a delay like 1 to 6 months post sale.

DAN is the only platform, that I am aware, that asks you and your buyer to specify if the sale should be kept private.
Great thread.

Most D to D sales go unreported,
1) Because they are either unremarkable, or...
2) Because, as stated above, you dont want a record of what you paid so you can increase the price without the inevitable, "but you only paid" discussion, especially if it is a mid to high value name you plan to outsource to EU's.

End user sales, however, may be reported unless there is an NDA.

Of course this is only my opinion and your milage may vary.

Peace,
Kenny
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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End user sales, however, may be reported unless there is an NDA.
At this point, my preference will be to not report unless I have explicit permission from the new owner. This is out of respect for their privacy.

Certainly others can do whatever they feel works best for them. The posts are interesting and potentially informative, and I'm certainly not adverse to folks using that aspect of the forum.
 
I frequent the Report thread and try to contribute when I can. I'm usually too lazy for screenshots.
I do feel like it's a good idea to try to disguise the domain name. Like "namepros in king" or whatever people do.

It crossed my mind to not share but I've benefited from sharing so seems karma-positive to share myself.
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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I do feel like it's a good idea to try to disguise the domain name. Like "namepros in king" or whatever people do.
That's a reasonable approach, to try to disguise the name from the search engines. Would a database like NameBio still be able to pick it up and list it, though? I'm not sure how the domain sales databases do all of their collections.
It crossed my mind to not share but I've benefited from sharing so seems karma-positive to share myself.
Sharing the information seemed like also a positive for being supportive of the Namepros group. For myself, though, after posting them over six months ago, no other sales happened. So, while probably unrelated, posting them didn't seem to be helpful from my perspective.
 
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okaydomains

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The question is whether the buyer really wants that information shared. And could it hurt future sales prospects?

1) Have you ever sold two domains to the same buyer? I haven't so I am not worried about upsetting future sales with the same buyer.

2) Related, most of my domains now have WHOIS privacy. So I'm not worried about the buyer of another name Googling one of my past sales, finding out that I report some of my smaller sales, and then not buying a domain from me. That sounds very far fetched.

That said, many years ago I sold a domain that was very high profile and the sale made it into the national newspapers. So I have had buyers ask me about that sale before, but its never blown up a new sale. If anything, it works in my favor because it tells them they're dealing with someone who has experience selling domains.

I do obscure the domain name in the reporting thread, as a courtesy to the new owner. Hopefully it stays out of Google that way.
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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1) Have you ever sold two domains to the same buyer? I haven't so I am not worried about upsetting future sales with the same buyer.

2) Related, most of my domains now have WHOIS privacy. So I'm not worried about the buyer of another name Googling one of my past sales, finding out that I report some of my smaller sales, and then not buying a domain from me. That sounds very far fetched.
I'm not sure if I ever sold two domains to the same buyer, or if they involved intermediaries flipping the domains. Registrar privacy settings nowadays obscure much. And this is not worried about someone googling my sales to find out what prices I have had for my domains, small or large. That wouldn't matter to a prospective buyer.

What does matter to me is that, if selling through the Afternic and Sedo marketplaces, I don't know who the buyer is. I don't know what their intentions are for the domains. If the intent is to use it, great! Posting the sale wouldn't probably be an issue. If the intent is to resell it, then they may not want the prospective buyer to know what the original sale price was. I'm simply trying to be respectful of that possibility.

The bottom line is that each of us can do that which makes them feel most comfortable. My preference at this point is to be very respectful of the buyer, and to post only if there is explicit consent directly from that individual.

Absolutely, though, I respect if others feel inclined to post, obscuring the name to protect from the Google searches, great! That works for you.
 

MustaAras

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0.99 handreg, hold time 10 months
D73F4D79-228F-4CC3-A8B7-8273BCF18936.jpeg
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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biggie

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Hi

i don't post sales in that section
but i have mentioned on the forum about a sale.

however, it depends, to me, on who or where you share with and what other details you provide.

i can recall at one time, other domainers would spam those buyers, when a domain was reported as sold.

often getting messages like, "i saw you purchased xbcdomain.com and i have xcb-domain.com, would you be interested in buying?"

then there are those who create threads about a sale and question why it sold for that amount and it's worthiness.
they might not even know who owns it or who owned it, nor any other intricate details, but have no problem critiquing, after the fact.

there is also the "long tail aspect" of not revealing.
in that for certain names, you may not want others digging where you dig.
you dig?

imo...
 

jhm

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Everyone's different. My view of the correct etiquette would be to mention it to the buyer, bit of courtesy. Tell them, give your reasons in a respectful way, and see if they're happy with the sale being reported. The old saying of "the customer is always right", giving them that respect. A portion of them may notice your professionalism, and deal with you again, for further domain related queries. You never know who you're dealing with sometimes, setting a standard may pay its dividends IMO
 
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MustaAras

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Congrats, but please consider posting this instead in the Reporting domain sales thread.
my bad, i post it to wrong thread. Hope mods will remove it. Thank you for reminding.
 
That's a reasonable approach, to try to disguise the name from the search engines. Would a database like NameBio still be able to pick it up and list it, though? I'm not sure how the domain sales databases do all of their collections.

Sharing the information seemed like also a positive for being supportive of the Namepros group. For myself, though, after posting them over six months ago, no other sales happened. So, while probably unrelated, posting them didn't seem to be helpful from my perspective.

NameBio doesn't crawl the web looking for screenshots and message board posts of purported sales. Namebio requires people show proof of their sales before taking their word for the sale. So that isn't too much of a danger.

Sharing sales should be helping others, not you. Sales others have posted over the last 6 months might be helpful to you.

Someone posted above about asking buyers permission. That's unrealistic. Most domain marketplaces don't offer the ability to communicate with buyers after a sale. Not to mention, I think in most cases, buyers don't want information like this shared and on the surface, it benefits them very little.
 

jhm

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NameBio doesn't crawl the web looking for screenshots and message board posts of purported sales. Namebio requires people show proof of their sales before taking their word for the sale. So that isn't too much of a danger.

Sharing sales should be helping others, not you. Sales others have posted over the last 6 months might be helpful to you.

Someone posted above about asking buyers permission. That's unrealistic. Most domain marketplaces don't offer the ability to communicate with buyers after a sale. Not to mention, I think in most cases, buyers don't want information like this shared and on the surface, it benefits them very little.
Based on the lack of communication with buyers once a sale has been made, I'd agree with you there. Maybe it is a bit unrealistic. I think the only point I was making was to be courteous (in the right moments, in certain cases). Not necessarily in all
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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NameBio doesn't crawl the web looking for screenshots and message board posts of purported sales. Namebio requires people show proof of their sales before taking their word for the sale. So that isn't too much of a danger.
So how does NameBio get the information including the actual proof about the sales?
 
So how does NameBio get the information including the actual proof about the sales?
I don't remember everything but I think I had to upload a pdf and/or screenshots when I reported a sale there.
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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You have to upload proof to NameBio to post sales independently. Same for DNJournal.
So this is self-verification using a screen image, but no independent confirmation with the marketplace.

What would be helpful, then is if NameBio and DNJournal have security software that confirms that the screen images are original and not altered. This would give added reassurance of the the integrity of the self-reporting system.