NameSilo

GoDaddy vs Estibot vs NameBio

Labeled as discuss in General Domain Discussion, started by gomikeright, Mar 27, 2020

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  1. Reddstagg

    Reddstagg Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Thanks for your feedback. Compared to some of my more dubious domains I think it is one of the better ones.

    I hear too many times how a hand reg can't be valuable as it doesn't have this or that history. Even if I register a name today and someone buys it tomorrow they are buying it because the name fits their required criteria.

    If domain name investing was that simple, everyone would be doing it...oh, wait a minute they are lol.

    The world is/will change and nobody can predict the future.

    A little humility goes a long way.

    Regards,

    Reddstagg
     
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  2. BrandAptly.com

    BrandAptly.com Established Member

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    Bullying or anything remotely resembling that offends my sensibilities. I would stand firm. It's my domain name and that's my price. You either pay it or move on. I don't care what the 'machines' say. There's a fine line between negotiation and manipulation, and I see buyers flirting with it far too often.
     
  3. Save Breach

    Save Breach Established Member

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    OKAY, since you have taken up this topic:

    Every service has a different approach (algorithm) to assess this value. No algorithm is actually perfect: so I simply take out the average, I may be silly but this is actually a good way to assess the real value of a domain you own, to negotiate with the end user (as a reference/citation) :)

    Side note: For actual acquisitions/reg/drop catch, I use my own scripts and use paid APIs (of DNS history, for example), to correlate with a set of parameters of what can be considered valuable and what not (in reseller and end user space) and its considerably better (more practical) than Estibot or, GD ;) but needs more development to become productive i believe.
     
  4. Reddstagg

    Reddstagg Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Thank you for your kind words.

    A Bully can only bully if the person they are trying to bully can be bullied.

    I don't think it was a case of that in this instance. However, I think that some people need to re-think their buying strategy. On one hand they tell you that your domain in worthless and then they offer you 35 times the value they place on it. That makes no sense to me.

    Imagine if you will that the best two letter domain name in the world had never been registered and potentially to the right buyer it could be worth millions. If, after all that time I happen to find this two letter domain name and hand register it. Does this automatically make the name worthless as it has no history. No, obviously not, but you just can't explain that to some people.

    I'll carry on doing what I'm doing and I'll get there eventually.

    Enjoy your journey.

    Regards,

    Reddstagg
     
  5. Reddstagg

    Reddstagg Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Good afternoon and welcome to NP as I see you're relatively new.

    Obviously, from the comments that you made your far from a Newbie to tech and domain names in general.

    I've been doing this for just over a year but I did a lot of reading and understanding before I bought/registered my first domain.

    I'm considered a Newbie but I bring 54 years of the university of life to the table. This gives me a different perspective, but it not something that gets you any credit in this world. I get mad when people tell you your domains are worthless but then try to buy them from you, obviously with a plan to make even more money off the same domain name.

    I'm lucky compared to most as I don't need to sell any domain names. If I don't have any money I just don't register or buy any names until I have enough funds.

    There are certain commodities/services that have never suffered during recessionary times such as bread and milk. Now, if you owned bread.com or milk.com they would be worth a shed load of money, but who is actually going to buy them. Maybe only five people in the world. I'd rather own buymilktoday.com buybreadtoday.com and know that there were potentially more people available and willing to buy the names.

    I'm not sure that the basic economic principle of supply and demand works the same for million dollar domain names.

    Maybe, just maybe one day I will own Milk.com. You could say its a very liquid domain.

    Enjoy your journey and good luck for the future.

    Regards,

    Reddstagg
     
  6. BrandAptly.com

    BrandAptly.com Established Member

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    Frankly, a domain's history does not mean anything to me...unless it's an existing business. I'm buying it for the vision I have for it. If the domain was once a business that went under, I personally wouldn't want to launch my new promising venture on the backbone of a fiasco.

    The two kinds of buyers:

    Buyer 1
    "That is a great domain name. Unfortunately, I'm a startup and my budget will only allow me to pay $x,xxx. Can we work out a deal?"

    Buyer 2
    "Your domain name is not worth what you're asking for. The bot says it is worth $x,xx. That's what I will give you."

    My response to Buyer 1
    "What are you proposing? Let's discuss your venture and let me know what I can work out for you."

    My response to Buyer 2
    "You and the damn bot can go dance." if I bother responding.
     
  7. frostify

    frostify Top Contributor VIP

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    There is no fool proof way for an automated system to evaluate the potential value of a domain but a good rule of thumb I normally use is:

    "Estibot Price and then remove a zero"
    If your name has Estibot $3,000 then I would value it at around $300.

    There's obviously exceptions to the rule, some worth much more, or much less, but Estibot minus a zero at the end seems pretty on-point for a lot of names I'm checking.
     
  8. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Top Member NameTalent VIP Gold Account Trusted Blogger

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    Having used both a lot, I agree that in terms of comparator sales GoDaddy do a better job and in general with dual words they find significant sales with both words. They have the advantage of the huge database of GD/Afternic data. What Estibot seems to do is to first evaluate the worth mainly not looking at comparator sales (based on for example search stats, whether a dictionary word, how much registered in different TLDs, and other factors) and then show you a few sales that are similar in value to what they propose, rather than the names being similar in niche.

    I think it depends on the kind of domain name which is better. If you are buying a name with a strong interest in search stats, that is where Estibot do best and it is really handy to have the search stats and CPC and advertisers data including a historical graph all in one place.

    In terms of new extensions, GoValue still does not yet very properly address how appropriate the match of the word to the TLD is. Estibot slightly better, but because it is so search focussed, depends on type of word how good it is.

    So the approaches are rather different with GoValue much more focussed on comparator sales. I find it worthwhile to look at both, but you really need to do a full analysis yourself, and view either of them as a second opinion.

    I agree with you that GoValue is good at evaluating the word value separately in compound words, although you can trick it into big valuations for silly combinations sometime.

    Bob
     
  9. jamesall

    jamesall BrandEntrance.com VIP Gold Account

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    This line made me laugh out loud.
     
  10. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I'd suggest buying the audiobook version of "Negotiation Genius". I'd then suggest listening to "The Secrets of Power Negotiating" and listen to chapter 4 at least 2-3 times. Throughout this book you'll find tactics that others use on you and you'll find why you shouldn't budge much from your price and if you do accept a counter offer, you should do so with adding some kind of conditions even if they are insignificant (for example that the buyer pay the escrow fees).

    Set a well thought out anchor price and don't budge much. If you don't set a price on your domains, then the buyer leads with the anchor price. If you have a price in mind, it is much better to put it out there and set the anchor price before negotiations begin. I would target the most ideal buyer when setting the BIN price on the domain.

    If you are getting $50-$100 offers on a domain it is either a domain investor or a jerk buyer. In either case, you should ignore. I would also set a minimum offer of $450 or so for all your domains. This will weed out the offers like this.

    You'll get offers from serious buyers with money, serious buyers that are cash strapped, buyers with a potential future use, dreamers with money, dreamers without money, and domain investors. If you price your domain and offer lease payments that are visible, you'll cover all the buyer types and can make the domain affordable even for buyers that are cash strapped.

    Most importantly, don't limit your prices based on what you think someone will pay. Most domain investors, including myself, have a habit of limiting their prices based on their own values. If you are not willing to pay $5,000 for a domain, don't project that "value" of yours onto your buyers.

    Back in 2013, I sold ImLonely(dot)com for $5,450 as a BIN. Chances are no one reading this would pay that much for the domain, but you have to envision what it could be worth to the right person at the right point in time. The domain still sits parked at the parking page it was pointed to 7 years ago. So the point is, don't limit your asking price based on what you think someone would pay. Visit DNJournal and study the prices there. Get into the habit of asking prices as if you were selling to the ideal buyer.

    Below is a video with good examples of not projecting our "values" onto our buyers.


     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2020
  11. cooljub

    cooljub Established Member

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    Don't fall for the bs
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2020
  12. Reddstagg

    Reddstagg Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Thank you very much for your wise words.

    The IP address was revealed to me so I knew exactly who the perspective buyer was. They didn't reveal themselves until after I had rejected their offer and had made my counter offer.

    They are a domain investor and were probably looking to just flip they name. They have experience with branding and marketing so probably already had a client in mind.

    I've over 30 years experience myself in insurance and finance and I'm fairly well versed with compromise and negotiation.

    However, I also have quite a fluid selling strategy and it varies from day to day. I might have been more accommodating if they had been upfront with me and not tried to steal the name from me.

    I know it's not worth thousands but I'd say to the right end user it is easily worth mid $xxx.

    We live and we learn. Each day is a new experience and this was actually a validation of sorts of my ability to spot a reasonable hand regging opportunity.

    There will be others so I will just sit and wait.

    Good luck with your journey.

    Regards,

    Reddstagg
     
  13. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I guess my point was that an "end user" would be paying $10,000 to $20,000+ at minimum to get a business like this off the ground, so this type of end user would probably more willing to pay $x,xxx for the domain.

    In the low $xxx range you are likely getting domain investors like you mentioned, and that is ok. But if you are paying $50 per year for the domain, you'd need a sell through at 16.7% just to break even at that price range.

    With a .com domain, if you have a sell through rate of 1%, then your average sales price needs to be $850 to break even. If you have a sell through rate of 2% then your average sales price needs to be $425 to break even.

    For the .direct domain you mentioned with a $50 renewal, if you have a sell through rate of 1%, then your average sales price needs to be $5,000 to break even. If you have a sell through rate of 2%, then your average sales price needs to be $2,500 to break even.

    If you are achieving beyond 4% it is likely that you are selling to domain investors.

    No matter what level you are going for, just make sure you have a plan for the sell through rate you want to achieve vs the asking price and adjust/improve that over time.
     
  14. stub

    stub DNStore.com PRO VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Is it possible to do bulk lookup for GoValue values?
     
  15. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    For all the names you have there you can get it via the domain manager.

    Don't think they have bulk lookup available to all yet.

    upload_2020-3-30_20-30-3.png
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
  16. NameBuyer.com

    NameBuyer.com Top Member PRO VIP Gold Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Sorry, replied above but forgot to choose "reply"
     
  17. stub

    stub DNStore.com PRO VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    No problem. I read it :)
     
  18. dande

    dande DomainFlexi.com VIP

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    This is one of the reasons why I consider Godaddy Appraisal the worst THING ever happened to domain business. Plus the fact they can't appraise any name beyond $25k
     
  19. Samer

    Samer Top Contributor VIP Blue Account

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    funny... :)
    My peeve 99% time feel gd value above $1K+
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
  20. dande

    dande DomainFlexi.com VIP

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    Yeah. GD Appraisal is perfect for low priced domains. If I have a domain that I value at $100-$1000, I'd run to GD as they're likely gonna be appraise above 1k. But anything above 1k is a kill joy.
     
  21. The Durfer

    The Durfer Top Contributor VIP Blue Account

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    your missing the point of overall value, seller, buyer, gd appraisal, estibot appraisal, namebio previous sales, but also, branding like brandpa, brandbucket, etc. All these chip away at the roughness and leave a beautiful statue price of your domain. Your masterpiece is thru time, not regging.
     
  22. The Durfer

    The Durfer Top Contributor VIP Blue Account

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    and dont forget the opportunities at namescon or knowing someone either, a professional appraisal also helps in pricing too. Desire, platform, trends, brands, timing, gosh so many things. Good Luck! :)
     
  23. Daniel Moran

    Daniel Moran Established Member

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    Maybe, just maybe one day I will own Milk.com. You could say its a very liquid domain.
    - Brilliant !
     
  24. jamie white

    jamie white Networkun

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    90% of domains appraised on gd are trash, m2s.org? j.PNG
     
  25. frank-germany

    frank-germany domainer since 2001 / musician VIP

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    guys this topic ha been discussed so often...

    just because it's behind a professional interface
    or the company behind the estimate is huge

    doesn't make the estimate
    anything neither correct nor uncorrect

    it just bocus
    hocus pokus
     

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