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strategy Domain Monetization Series (Part 1): Pay-Per-Monetization

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Using Pay-Per-Monetization to generate revenue from a domain​


This is the first part in a multi-part series dedicated to domain name monetization and revenue models.

For over 3 decades, I have always recommended that domain investors and resellers consider domain name monetization strategies to leverage their assets ability to generate at least a little revenue to pay their own renewals each year while they await the perfect end-user and not put all their eggs in one basket.

In Part 1 of the domain monetization series, we'll look at different ways to leverage pay-per-monetization strategies to give you some ideas to research further in your quest to create new revenue streams with the domains simply sitting in your portfolio, collecting dust and stacking renewal costs every year.

Pay-Per-Monetization Strategies:​

  • Pay-Per-Click
  • Pay-Per-Impression
  • Pay-Per-Lead
  • Pay-Per-View

Pay-Per-Click Monetization​

Pay-per-click (PPC) is an online advertising strategy leveraged by companies to generate sales by paying publishers (website owners) every time one of their advertisement links is “clicked” on.

There are a few options you can leverage with Pay-Per-Click to help you generate some revenue:
  • 3rd Party Domain Parking
  • In-house domain parking
  • Hybrid In-House Domain Parking and Sales Lander
3rd Party Domain Parking
Most of you are already familiar with this strategy, as it's the primary way to generate parking revenue when you don't have your own website or know how to develop and host a parking page of your own. It's quick and easy to redirect your domain name to someone else's platform for a percentage of the pay-per-click revenue your domain generates. With this method, you leave money on the table because the parking company gets the lion's share of each click for helping you monetize your domain and then pays you a percentage of each click.

Examples of companies that offer domain parking services:
  • Bodis
  • Godaddy
  • SEDO
  • ParkingCrew
  • Skenzo
In-House Domain Parking
In-house domain parking uses the same principle as 3rd party domain parking, except that you host the parking page on your own server or redirect it to one of your portfolio pages with Pay-Per-Click ads on it. This method puts the click revenue in your pocket instead of just a percentage that you get when using a 3rd party parking service. Additionally, it's common for 3rd party pages to get bumped into the supplemental index, so you lose out on organic search traffic.

The trade-off is that you'll need to either set up or code your own parking page with ads for each domain name individually, or you'll need to redirect each domain name to a different page in your portfolio dedicated and optimized for pay-per-click ads related to your domain asset niche.

Personally, I find it easier to redirect to a dedicated portfolio page. That avoids any maximum site limits with hosting plans and makes it easier to manage in a centralized location.

Examples of some CMS (content management systems) that can be used for a portfolio site with dedicated in-house parking pages might be:
  • WordPress
  • Joomla
  • Drupal
  • Magento
  • OpenCart
Note: I used to leverage WordPress for a portfolio and then started liking OpenCart a little better.

Regardless of which CMS you choose, there will be a slight learning curve, but it's going to be way easier and faster than having to study code (HTML, CSS, PHP, JS, etc.) for months or years to be able to code your own from scratch.

Once you have your CMS picked out, you're going to want to make sure each parking or landing page is optimized for the niche the domain you will be redirecting to is in. That's going to help with your conversion rate.

It's also vital that each page has unique and targeted content about the domain assets niche. I generally suggest that you have a minimum of 500+ words per page to help with indexing. The beauty of in-house parking is that you have the power of unique content backing you, which allows you to benefit from organic search traffic for the keywords and phrases you optimized for.

Note: SEO/SEM is a completely different topic, so I'm not going to get into it in this article. I just wanted to quickly brush on it so you know one of the benefits of in-house versus 3rd party parking or landing (more control over your page content).

Once your pages are ready, you can start redirecting your domain(s).

Next, you'll want to monetize the pages with ads, for which, again, there are several options available.

Some examples of pay-per-Click advertisers:
  • CJ (Commission Junction)
  • InfoLinks
  • Google Adsense
  • AdThrive
  • SkimLinks
  • OutBrain
  • Propellers
Hybrid In-House Domain Parking and Sales Lander:
You can duplicate everything above for this one; the only difference is that in addition to the pay-per-Click ads and links, you'll also have a buy it now or make an offer option on the same page, effectively making it a sales landing.

Most (if not all) CMS platforms have plug-ins or add-ons that allow you to add a buy now or make offer option to your pages. Be sure to research that while selecting the CMS you want to use to ensure it will work for your hybrid portfolio model.

Pay-Per-Impression Monetization​

Just like with Pay-Per-Click, the ads will be similar, except that you'll be paid via the number of authentic impressions rather than just by clicks. Pay-per-impression (PPI) generally pays less than pay-per-Click (PPC). So keep that in mind if you choose that method of monetization.

The same companies generally provide PPI ads, so use the list above of companies to find the best one(s) for you.

Your CMS pages and content for PPI should follow the same guidelines as with PPC.

Pay-Per-Lead Monetization​

This one is implemented just like PPC and PPI into your CMS pages, except that it pays more since you'll essentially be pre-qualifying the leads or getting visitors to fill out applications through your page reference to apply for or buy something. Many PPL (Pay-Per-Lead) campaigns require a form or application to be submitted (in some cases, a purchase or approval must be confirmed).

Some examples of a few pay-per-Lead affiliate programs:
  • American Express
  • Hiscox
  • National Debt Relief
  • Swagbucks
  • Quickbooks
  • Liberty Mutual
  • 1st Class Medical
  • Fetch Pet Insurance
  • and many more...

Pay-Per-View​

Like with PPL, PPI, and PPC, PPV (pay-per-View) can generate revenue, except with this method, they have to watch something. It's common for most PPV options to be in the form of a video advertisement embedded into a YouTube (or other) video. However, there are also programs that will pay if someone watches an online seminar, educational programs all the way through, or live cam video chat.

Some examples of pay-per-View (PPV) affiliate programs:
  • YouTube + Google Adsense for Video
  • Chaturbate
  • Bet365
  • Streamate
  • William Hill
  • MyFreeCams
  • G2A

In conclusion:​

That concludes Part 1 of the domain monetization series. Stay tuned for other monetization models in future parts of this series.

Remember: At the end of the day, what works for one may not work for another, and vice versa.

Be sure to do all your own research before investing in anything in life or building out a brand as a new revenue stream.

Good luck in all your domain adventures!
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
What about

Domain Redirect Traffic?

 
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Without reading this article - will do it immediately - thanks @Eric Lyon
In case I mary again, you are invited

@Relaceltic : You mean the 301 redirect unmasked? That's what most of the Blackhat SEO guys do. Having a good website with good DA/DR which is aged, has good TF, CF, and so on, develop it with shit and redirects each and everybody. Don't know if this is even allowed.

Best:)
 
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What about

Domain Redirect Traffic?

Redirecting traffic from a domain name is generally frowned upon and a common blackhat SEO/SEM tactic to manipulate a domain names ranking data in order to trick potential buyers into thinking the domain may have more value than it really does. It's also used to try and force clicks to make more money deceptively.

Most parking companies have policies against redirecting traffic to a parked domain using their platform.

For example:
Domain owner may not re-direct traffic to their parked domain name. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, traffic redirected from other domain names, traffic originating from advertising and purchased traffic such as pop-under or exit traffic. Each domain name must be parked separately.
SEDO Terms of Use

It's also important to understand that many ad providers can detect invalid/untargeted traffic sources, which could result in your ad account or domain being penalized. For instance, Googles stance on invalid traffic is:
Invalid traffic is any activity that doesn't come from a real user with genuine interest. It can include accidental clicks caused by intrusive ad implementations, fraudulent clicking by competing advertisers, advertising botnets and more.

Our Ad Traffic Quality team is dedicated to stopping all types of invalid traffic so that advertisers don't have to pay for it and the people who cause it don't profit from it.
For example, publishers might ask (or even pay) users to click on ads, watch videos, or view content they wouldn't normally engage with to increase their impression counts.

Traffic caused by deceptive tactics like these creates bad user experiences and provides little or no value to advertisers, which is why we are committed to stamping it out.
Google Invalid Traffic and invalid user activity

Forcing people with a redirect to visit a parked page (Especially one that is untargeted/unrelated to the topic/niche) is just a bad idea. I would recommend that you avoid tactics like that.

That's just my opinion though. To each their own.
 
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Redirecting traffic from a domain name is generally frowned upon and a common blackhat SEO/SEM tactic to manipulate a domain names ranking data in order to trick potential buyers into thinking the domain may have more value than it really does. It's also used to try and force clicks to make more money deceptively.

Most parking companies have policies against redirecting traffic to a parked domain using their platform.

For example:
Domain owner may not re-direct traffic to their parked domain name. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, traffic redirected from other domain names, traffic originating from advertising and purchased traffic such as pop-under or exit traffic. Each domain name must be parked separately.
SEDO Terms of Use

It's also important to understand that many ad providers can detect invalid/untargeted traffic sources, which could result in your ad account or domain being penalized. For instance, Googles stance on invalid traffic is:
Invalid traffic is any activity that doesn't come from a real user with genuine interest. It can include accidental clicks caused by intrusive ad implementations, fraudulent clicking by competing advertisers, advertising botnets and more.

Our Ad Traffic Quality team is dedicated to stopping all types of invalid traffic so that advertisers don't have to pay for it and the people who cause it don't profit from it.
For example, publishers might ask (or even pay) users to click on ads, watch videos, or view content they wouldn't normally engage with to increase their impression counts.

Traffic caused by deceptive tactics like these creates bad user experiences and provides little or no value to advertisers, which is why we are committed to stamping it out.
Google Invalid Traffic and invalid user activity

Forcing people with a redirect to visit a parked page (Especially one that is untargeted/unrelated to the topic/niche) is just a bad idea. I would recommend that you avoid tactics like that.

That's just my opinion though. To each their own.
I am not sure @NameInbox was referring to those black hat redirection practices, maybe their question was about "selling redirection", which was mentioned on a recent blog post as one of the legitimate ways of earning with domains. If I understood correctly, it would be redirecting traffic that reaches our keyword domain to a business site that pays us for this redirected traffic. I have not found out all about it yet, but it could be worth investigating, in my opinion.
 
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I am not sure @NameInbox was referring to those black hat redirection practices, maybe their question was about "selling redirection", which was mentioned on a recent blog post as one of the legitimate ways of earning with domains. If I understood correctly, it would be redirecting traffic that reaches our keyword domain to a business site that pays us for this redirected traffic. I have not found out all about it yet, but it could be worth investigating, in my opinion.
That would be a slightly different strategy, as it involves the selling of redirected traffic, specifically.

The unfortunate side-effect is that the business buying the traffic may be impacted negatively if the traffic seller is sending traffic from bad neighbor sites or penalized domains.

The top 10 Google Penalties for unnatural inbound linking/redirecting:
google-search-penalty-infographic.png


ahref's view on the matter also has unnatural links at the top of the list:
The most common manual actions that webmasters care to resolve these days are related to the attempts to manipulate Google’s search results. This may be a coincidence, but these penalties are even next to each other on the list of manual actions. These are:
  • Unnatural links to your site.
  • Unnatural links from your site.
  • Thin content with little or no added value.
Source

It really boils down to where the domain being redirected is getting it's traffic from. If it's natural/organic typins of people trying to visit a site that no longer exists and the new domain it redirects to is about the same or similar topic, it may not impact the buyer or seller of the traffic, but eventually, people will stop typing the old domain name as they find out the site is gone.

If the domain redirecting traffic is using other tactics to get people to visit it and then redirecting it, it might start raising flags in the algorithms that could pose penalties/spam scores on the domain redirecting, which in return could pass some of those penalties onto the buyer of the traffic that penalized domain is selling to them.

Every case is different and it's hard to know what the exact algorithm penalties will be in each situation.

At the end of the day though, it's probably best that a site doesn't buy redirect traffic. It's like playing Russian roulette, at some point in time, the chamber will be loaded and the buyer will only be hurting their own long-term survival chances.

The obvious questions would be:
  • Is it a viable short-term revenue model for a domain reseller to sell their natural/organic traffic? Sure.
  • Will the domain eventually slow down on natural/organic traffic and lose it's value? Yes, it will.
  • Could both; the seller and buyer suffer search engine penalties or spam score if the traffic going to the redirecting domain becomes unnatural and then passes to the buyers URL? Yes.
  • Is it ethical to knowingly sell unnatural traffic? No, as it can hurt the buyers ranking data.
Everyone's different, but I generally avoid buying traffic, redirects, links, etc... Natural is the best policy to avoid any long-term unfortunate situations or devaluing.

To each their own.
 
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That would be a slightly different strategy, as it involves the selling of redirected traffic, specifically.

The unfortunate side-effect is that the business buying the traffic may be impacted negatively if the traffic seller is sending traffic from bad neighbor sites or penalized domains.

The top 10 Google Penalties for unnatural inbound linking/redirecting:
google-search-penalty-infographic.png


ahref's view on the matter also has unnatural links at the top of the list:
The most common manual actions that webmasters care to resolve these days are related to the attempts to manipulate Google’s search results. This may be a coincidence, but these penalties are even next to each other on the list of manual actions. These are:
  • Unnatural links to your site.
  • Unnatural links from your site.
  • Thin content with little or no added value.
Source

It really boils down to where the domain being redirected is getting it's traffic from. If it's natural/organic typins of people trying to visit a site that no longer exists and the new domain it redirects to is about the same or similar topic, it may not impact the buyer or seller of the traffic, but eventually, people will stop typing the old domain name as they find out the site is gone.

If the domain redirecting traffic is using other tactics to get people to visit it and then redirecting it, it might start raising flags in the algorithms that could pose penalties/spam scores on the domain redirecting, which in return could pass some of those penalties onto the buyer of the traffic that penalized domain is selling to them.

Every case is different and it's hard to know what the exact algorithm penalties will be in each situation.

At the end of the day though, it's probably best that a site doesn't buy redirect traffic. It's like playing Russian roulette, at some point in time, the chamber will be loaded and the buyer will only be hurting their own long-term survival chances.

The obvious questions would be:
  • Is it a viable short-term revenue model for a domain reseller to sell their natural/organic traffic? Sure.
  • Will the domain eventually slow down on natural/organic traffic and lose it's value? Yes, it will.
  • Could both; the seller and buyer suffer search engine penalties or spam score if the traffic going to the redirecting domain becomes unnatural and then passes to the buyers URL? Yes.
  • Is it ethical to knowingly sell unnatural traffic? No, as it can hurt the buyers ranking data.
Everyone's different, but I generally avoid buying traffic, redirects, links, etc... Natural is the best policy to avoid any long-term unfortunate situations or devaluing.

To each their own.
Thank you once more!
 
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Dear @Eric Lyon :
Could you please give a bit more detailed information about this Modell:

Pay-Per-View​


I think that might be something that would fit into the better Domains with the Traffic I have.
I don't know where and how to start or where to develop a Page.
If you could give a little Deep-Dive, I would appreciate it.


Thanks!
 
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Dear @Eric Lyon :
Could you please give a bit more detailed information about this Modell:



I think that might be something that would fit into the better Domains with the Traffic I have.
I don't know where and how to start or where to develop a Page.
If you could give a little Deep-Dive, I would appreciate it.


Thanks!
The following "Pay-Per-View" part of the article was intended to help members get started in their research with a basic idea and direction:

Pay-Per-View​

Like with PPL, PPI, and PPC, PPV (pay-per-View) can generate revenue, except with this method, they have to watch something. It's common for most PPV options to be in the form of a video advertisement embedded into a YouTube (or other) video. However, there are also programs that will pay if someone watches an online seminar, educational programs all the way through, or live cam video chat.

Some examples of pay-per-View (PPV) affiliate programs:
  • YouTube + Google Adsense for Video
  • Chaturbate
  • Bet365
  • Streamate
  • William Hill
  • MyFreeCams
  • G2A
I only listed 7 of the most popular PPV programs (Random niches), but there are others. It really depends on your domain assets niche category as to which PPV program you are going to want to research more.

It's also important to know what skills/knowledge you already have when it comes to getting a web page or website online and accessible for everyone to visit.

Here are some general questions to help me assess what you need to get started:
  1. Are you familiar with or do you already have a hosting plan?
  2. Are you familiar with coding languages (Html, css, php, js, etc.)?
  3. Are you familiar with CMS (Content Management Systems)?
  4. What niche category is your domain name in?
  5. Have you already researched advertising programs within your domains niche category?
  6. Do you have a common payment processing account that an advertising program can pay you through (E.g. Paypal)?
  7. Are you familiar with various marketing techniques to get a new web page or website in front of potential visitors?
  8. Are you familiar with basic SEO (Search Engine Optimization) best practices?
There's tutorials online for all the above to start your adventure. I would be happy to point you to a few if you let me know which number(s) above you want to learn more about.

Happy to help.
 
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Thanks Again for your reply.
To Keep it Quick:

Here are some general questions to help me assess what you need to get started:
  1. Are you familiar with or do you already have a hosting plan? ➡️ I have a Hosting Plan with one of my Domain Hosting Providers
  2. Are you familiar with coding languages (Html, css, php, js, etc.)? ➡️ Not at all 😥
  3. Are you familiar with CMS (Content Management Systems)? ➡️ A bit of knowledge through my previous job as a Mgmt. Consultant - but not enough to create something "good" without investing much time.
  4. What niche category is your domain name in? ➡️ One Domain is called "TurkeyDrama.com," the other is called "PCPTV.com," "BoxFollowers.com," Now registered: StrmIT.com, Sptsy.com, CastlyTV.com - so there is a broad range I can cover.
  5. Have you already researched advertising programs within your domains niche category? ➡️ No experience :(
  6. Do you have a common payment processing account that an advertising program can pay you through (E.g., Paypal)? ➡️ Yes, I have a Business Account for PayPal, and from Consulting skills to implementation and understanding of Payment Service Provider Logic.
  7. Are you familiar with various marketing techniques to get a new web page or website in front of potential visitors? ➡️ Learning, you triggered me with your Appraisals, but I know a bit - of course, I am still a Newbie, but I know how to get ranked with Mozz DA, Ahrefs DR, TF, TF Ratio, Citation, and so on. Also, have a SEMRush Account.
  8. Are you familiar with basic SEO (Search Engine Optimization) best practices? ➡️ Does this refer to the question above? I have no WordPress Skills, but I have in the past Shopify Accounts.

Kind regards!
 
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Thanks Again for your reply.
To Keep it Quick:

Here are some general questions to help me assess what you need to get started:
  1. Are you familiar with or do you already have a hosting plan? ➡️ I have a Hosting Plan with one of my Domain Hosting Providers
  2. Are you familiar with coding languages (Html, css, php, js, etc.)? ➡️ Not at all 😥
  3. Are you familiar with CMS (Content Management Systems)? ➡️ A bit of knowledge through my previous job as a Mgmt. Consultant - but not enough to create something "good" without investing much time.
  4. What niche category is your domain name in? ➡️ One Domain is called "TurkeyDrama.com," the other is called "PCPTV.com," "BoxFollowers.com," Now registered: StrmIT.com, Sptsy.com, CastlyTV.com - so there is a broad range I can cover.
  5. Have you already researched advertising programs within your domains niche category? ➡️ No experience :(
  6. Do you have a common payment processing account that an advertising program can pay you through (E.g., Paypal)? ➡️ Yes, I have a Business Account for PayPal, and from Consulting skills to implementation and understanding of Payment Service Provider Logic.
  7. Are you familiar with various marketing techniques to get a new web page or website in front of potential visitors? ➡️ Learning, you triggered me with your Appraisals, but I know a bit - of course, I am still a Newbie, but I know how to get ranked with Mozz DA, Ahrefs DR, TF, TF Ratio, Citation, and so on. Also, have a SEMRush Account.
  8. Are you familiar with basic SEO (Search Engine Optimization) best practices? ➡️ Does this refer to the question above? I have no WordPress Skills, but I have in the past Shopify Accounts.

Kind regards!
Excellent!

You know more than your average Joe/Jane. ;)

1. You can leverage your existing hosting plan. If it only allows 1 website, you can create a sub-folder to add WordPress as your portfolio. If your hosting allows more websites than you have now, you can add it on a new domain name dedicated to your WP portfolio.

Depending on your hosting provider, they may offer a simple WordPress installation feature which makes it easy peazy to set-up wordpress. Be sure to check with them about that. Their support may be able to help out as well, even if they don't have an automated way to do it.

Regardless, you'll need the WP cms to get started on your revenue generating adventure without having to know code.

2. See above / No code required with WP cms (Though it could be helpful to learn so you can modify your own templates) - W3Schools is one of the best free code learning sites out there. (Start with HTML, then move into CSS)

3. See 1 and 2 (Above) - You can also check out the Official WP beginners guides/tutorials database.

4. An example for the following 2 domains "StrmIT.com / CastlyTV.com" might be (Note: Most of these require you to use their scripts on your domain and Not WP): Filmon (Live TV + Affiliate Platform), WpStream (Integrates live streaming to website from your android phone wherever you are - WP plugin available), vPlayed (White-Label OTT Platform).

5. See 4 (above)

6. Excellent! Most providers have Paypal as a payment option.

7. No worries, check out my article/check list from 2011 with 247 marketing ideas.

8. Here's a basics guide by ahrefs.

Hopefully that can help get you headed in the right direction.

Good luck :)
 
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Thank you so much for your effort :)
I will start with it right away!
But I made a mistake.
I regged the Domain StrmIT.com on SAV, which doesn't offer Hosting.
My German Provider (STRATO), where I have Hosting (CRONON AG), has a complete package.

What can I do now?

Otherwise, I will start with SEO since it will take time.
And read through your guides.


Thank you so much!
 
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Thank you so much for your effort :)
I will start with it right away!
But I made a mistake.
I regged the Domain StrmIT.com on SAV, which doesn't offer Hosting.
My German Provider (STRATO), where I have Hosting (CRONON AG), has a complete package.

What can I do now?

Otherwise, I will start with SEO since it will take time.
And read through your guides.


Thank you so much!
I'm a die hard Godaddy user. I've been hosting sites with them for almost 3 decades now. So, if you're asking for a suggestion as to who to go with for hosting, I generally recommend Godaddy.

I believe they Also have an easy automated WP install feature as well these days as part of their hosting plans.

Be sure to research their hosting options/features prior jumping in head first. You can find their plans here: https://www.godaddy.com/hosting/web-hosting

Keep in mind, a domain does not have to be where you're hosting it. Check your hosts FAQ on how to host/point a 3rd party domain.
 
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I believe they Also have an easy automated WP install feature as well these days as part of their hosting plans.

Be sure to research their hosting options/features prior jumping in head first. You can find their plans here: https://www.godaddy.com/hosting/web-hosting

Keep in mind, a domain does not have to be where you're hosting it. Check your hosts FAQ on how to host/point a 3rd party domain.
l already wrote about this, is NP promoting Godaddy :ROFL: :xf.wink: :xf.cool:
 
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Well, their reputation on the Market is by most of the Domainer's and even not Domainer's known.
I recently moved to SAV and signed up for other Registrars, but that's why I wouldn't say I like how GoDaddy prices their domains without being in Domain Club.
But that's a different Story.
I Will call GoDaddy today to talk about their Hosting Plans.

I think there are templates for such a WordPress Design.

Best!
Looking forward to Part 2 =)
 
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l already wrote about this, is NP promoting Godaddy :ROFL: :xf.wink: :xf.cool:
You wrote about using Godaddy hosting to start a new WordPress based domain portfolio or to develope a new revenue stream with a domain?

No clue what companies are paying to advertise on NamePros.

Let's keep this thread on-topic please.
 
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That would be a slightly different strategy, as it involves the selling of redirected traffic, specifically.

The unfortunate side-effect is that the business buying the traffic may be impacted negatively if the traffic seller is sending traffic from bad neighbor sites or penalized domains.
Thanks for all of the valuable information you have provided in this discussion, @Eric Lyon.

Just to clarify where the blog reference was made, my suggestion had nothing to do with using unnatural links or traffic. It rather was the situation if a domain investor owns a very valuable and totally generic domain name for a product or service. A business offering that product or service might pay to have that domain directed for a certain time period to their business that sells that service or product.

It is clearly not ideal, since when the association ends so will that traffic. But it might be a way to test the value. Some sort of rental with an option to later purchase at a certain price might work in favour of both parties.

-Bob
 
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my suggestion had nothing to do with using unnatural links or traffic. It rather was the situation if a domain investor owns a very valuable and totally generic domain name for a product or service. A business offering that product or service might pay to have that domain directed for a certain time period to their business that sells that service or product.
This is exactly what I had understood from reading the blog, @Bob Hawkes, please excuse my not having been able to express it with clarity (language limitations).

I have followed up with this subject and, although I am still struggling to grasp the SEO concepts, I found some Google in-depth knowledge on redirection best practices that might help here. That is to say, Google teaches webmasters which redirections are considered as legitimate and thus not penalized, and how to make sure its search engine gets the signs correctly.

Perhaps I am being naive, but I think there should be a clean, transparent way of selling real-time, temporary unmasked redirection (not backlinks). Not from a typo, nor from a tricky domain, but from the category generic name. Why would traffic become unnatural, if owner/admin
did not want it to? Not everyone is willing to act unethically.
About the slowdown when time passes, would it fatally happen, even if new users would continue to search for the category? I really have no experience at all, and that's why I'm asking, @Eric Lyon , thank you in advance for your patience.
 
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PPC (Pay-per-click) unfortunately will die soon
 
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