Dan.com

poll What is the definition of a domainer?

NameSilo

What does the word 'domainer' mean?

  • This poll is still running and the standings may change.
  • Earns a living buying and selling domain(s)

    2
    votes
    5.4%
  • Works any amount of time buying and selling domain(s)

    15
    votes
    40.5%
  • It's just a word, doesn't mean anything

    2
    votes
    5.4%
  • Profits from a domain name in any way

    0
    votes
    0.0%
  • Registers and sells one or more domain names

    4
    votes
    10.8%
  • Earns a living monetising domain(s)

    2
    votes
    5.4%
  • It's an identity not a profession

    0
    votes
    0.0%
  • It's the weekend, give it a break!

    6
    votes
    16.2%
  • Something else (please explain)

    6
    votes
    16.2%
  • This poll is still running and the standings may change.

redemo

Mug RuithTop Contributor
Impact
2,449
I checked several reputable dictionaries for a concise definition of the word 'domainer' but most redirect to 'domain', which has multiple definitions. So, since domainer is not a dictionary word, and is therefore its meaning is entirely subjective to the individual, what does 'domainer' mean to you? I read the post https://www.namepros.com/threads/what-it-means-to-be-a-domainer.1274515/ from @Igor Mironyuk in researching this poll. I'm going to be (n) as always, doesn't really matter because this poll is about progress not popularity. If you can't tolerate critics don't do anything new or interesting. Jeff Bezos.

I'm gonna go out on a limb here, and say my opinion has changed after reading your responses to recent polls. My opinion is now that a domainer is a person who makes a FULL-TIME INCOME monetising domain names. Anything else is a variant of domainer which requires and pre-fix or a suff-fix. Part-time domainer, side-hustle domainer, newbie domainer. Whereas domainer is a full-time occupation. I arrived at this conclusion by considering other similar words and what they mean. Take programmer. If you say she is a programmer it would generally mean that's what she does for a living, rather than as a hobby. Same goes for he is an engineer or she is a developer would generally mean it's their job. So he or she is a domainer means it's a job not a hobby or a side hustle.

Then comes the second part part which is how do you define monetising a domain name? Seems the majority consensus is through selling domain names. That can't be accurate because you can earn a full-time income doing that in various ways like selling, parking, developing, leasing, providing email and so much more besides. It also can't be defined by volume of domain names because going on the logic that a full-time domainer could buy one domain name for ten thousand dollars and sell it for a million dollars, and that's all they do professionally, then by the aforementioned logic they would be a full-time domainer. Same goes if you buy a domain name for ten thousand and parked it to earn a million dollars, since your not the actual advertiser. Same goes for leasing a domain name. The counterargument to developing domain names is if you bought a domain name and develop it into a website are you a domainer or a developer? I'm stuck here. If you did it multiple times to either eventually sell the developed domain name, or earn profit from multiple developed domain names, then I think it qualifies but doing it once, well I don't know? And I know this strongly divides opinion so I'm open to your considered responses.

I like what @jhm said in the thread by @Igor Mironyuk 'A domainer is an individual or company that actively engages in the buying, selling, marketing, monetization and publishing of internet domain names and other related web and or internet-based properties.' But again, this leaves open the question of volume, can the definition be applied to one domain name or must it involve multiple domain names, and if so how many and in what period of time? In that thread @bmugford said 'I don't really like the term "domainer". I prefer "domain investor".' perhaps that would be a more appropriate term, but it doesn't answer the question what is a domainer?

These sources all provided dead ends for the definition of domainer

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/spellcheck/english/?q=domainer

collinsdictionary.com/spellcheck/english?q=domainer

dictionary.cambridge.org/spellcheck/english/?q=domainer

merriam-webster.com/dictionary/domainer

britannica.com/dictionary/eb/spelling/domainer

dictionary.com/misspelling?term=domainer

macmillandictionary.com/spellcheck/british/?q=domainer

I'll ask the mod team to add additional options for what is the definition of a domainer if you ask in the thread.
 
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redemo

Mug RuithTop Contributor
Impact
2,449
Domainer is a professional occupation, that's why it deserves an accurate definition. It's not a slang term for people who carry out domaining as their job. Domainer is a job title, and I think it means ' somebody who earns a living from buying, selling and leasing domain names. ' All these off-topic comments aren't relevant and do not assist in answering the central question of what is a domainer? The aim of the thread is to help define the word.
 

Future Sensors

78% of human domainers will be replaced by robotsTop Contributor
Impact
14,507

branding

bra.nding.euTop Contributor
Impact
8,483
here's where I'm at now. A professional domainer earns a living buying and selling, or leasing, domain names. That means they earn enough money from domaining to meet all their living and lifestyle costs. An amateur domainer tries to buy and sell, or lease, domain names. It is totally irrelevant how many domain names they own, above the number one, and it is also irrelevant how much money they make or lose in the pursuit of profit. I think profit is an important consideration though, as fleshed-out below..

Plot twist:

I make more from domaining than from my day to day job. I could afford to drop either of them to afford my living and lifestyle cost.

Am I a domainer?
 
Impact
428
I don't think it's really that frustrating. At the risk of having many people disagree with me, I think the real definition of a domainer would be "a person who sells domain names for a profit." I don't know that you have to sell names full time or a lot of them to be a domainer!
 
Impact
3,174
Hello,

Here are some related definitions from our video production team:
  1. Domainers buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names for a profit
  2. Domainers profit from buying, selling, marketing, and/or monetizing domain names
  3. Domaining: To buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names for a profit
  4. Domaining companies buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names

We hope that helps.
 
Impact
2,115
@redemo First off, excellent question. IMO, if you call yourself a domainer you are limiting your potential. The word may appear in a future dictionary update, who knows. But you should consider yourself as a digital or online entrepreneur. Domaining should be only a part of the picture.
 
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jhm

Top Contributor
Impact
11,288
Hello,

Here are some related definitions from our video production team:
  1. Domainers buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names for a profit
  2. Domainers profit from buying, selling, marketing, and/or monetizing domain names
  3. Domaining: To buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names for a profit
  4. Domaining companies buy, sell, market, and/or monetize domain names

We hope that helps.
Nice seeing you around. Hope you're keeping well @Bravo Mod Team
 

lovely4ever

Established Member
Impact
1,683
Donainer is usually a stressed person who his/ her business is only trading domains for a profit and he/she checking his/her email 344 times a day waiting the congratulation email from godaddy or afternic or sedo or squadhelp or brandbucket that he/she made a sale .

.
 
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Fancy.domains

Top Contributor
Impact
9,522
I think we can compare it to a programmer. There are the ones who do it as a hobby, and there are the ones who makes a living out of it, as a profession.

So there are domain hobbyists and there a domain professionals, and there are even people in between 😜.
 

Mytz.com

Domain [email protected] PITE.com GOZI.com JALI.com TOPU.comTop Contributor
Impact
1,342
i only have one this name...VipHome
 

eyedomainous

PDFTV.com Premium DomainsTop Contributor
Impact
1,151
Because a domain, technically refers to the extension, as in .ca is the domain of Canada, the term domainer, at best, is a portmanteau / combination of two words: Domain Namer / Domainer.

A domainer performs the naming function in domain addressing.

At worst, the term 'domainer' is misappropriated by Namers. And the price we pay for this off-branding is significant, IMO, as the term domain is most associated with a category, field, or sphere of influence. Not a product.

Namers : creators of web ID addresses, is spot on branding that would produce far better market outcomes.
 

Future Sensors

78% of human domainers will be replaced by robotsTop Contributor
Impact
14,507
Because a domain, technically refers to the extension, as in .ca is the domain of Canada
No, this is not correct. You probably mean that .ca is the top-level domain (TLD) in this context.
 

iTesla

Established Member
Impact
539
Because a domain, technically refers to the extension, as in .ca is the domain of Canada, the term domainer, at best, is a portmanteau / combination of two words: Domain Namer / Domainer.

A domainer performs the naming function in domain addressing.

At worst, the term 'domainer' is misappropriated by Namers. And the price we pay for this off-branding is significant, IMO, as the term domain is most associated with a category, field, or sphere of influence. Not a product.

Namers : creators of web ID addresses, is spot on branding that would produce far better market outcomes.
That is why there are 2 types of Domainers.
1. those who create new names = Domainers
2. those who see what was created and occupy the addresses = Dosquatters
 

eyedomainous

PDFTV.com Premium DomainsTop Contributor
Impact
1,151
No, this is not correct. You probably mean that .ca is the top-level domain (TLD) in this context.

Yes, it is correct, as "the hierarchy of domains descends from the right to the left label in the name; each label to the left specifies a subdivision, or subdomain of the domain to the right".

"Domain names, like www.example.com and example.com are also hostnames, whereas the com domain is not."

While what you are saying is correct, its misses The top-level Domain point.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_name
 

eyedomainous

PDFTV.com Premium DomainsTop Contributor
Impact
1,151
That is why there are 2 types of Domainers.
1. those who create new names = Domainers
2. those who see what was created and occupy the addresses = Dosquatters

1. those who create new names = namers.
2. those who occupy an address space = addressers
3. those who create new domain extensions = domainers.
 

Future Sensors

78% of human domainers will be replaced by robotsTop Contributor
Impact
14,507
@eyedomainous You're misinterpreting the Wikipedia article, and how terminology in DNS is used.
 

bmugford

www.DataCube.comTop Contributor
Impact
42,443
That is why there are 2 types of Domainers.
1. those who create new names = Domainers
Cool, I just came up with the brand "Blorksky"...am I a domainer now?

Brad
 

eyedomainous

PDFTV.com Premium DomainsTop Contributor
Impact
1,151
[@eyedomainous] You're misinterpreting the Wikipedia article, and how terminology in DNS is used.

Ditto, I thought the same about your emphasis on 'top level'.
So I'll state my interpretation and you tell me where I go wrong.

'Top Level' simply refers to a domain category, and its extension is an abbreviation of that domain category: .com for commercial, .org for organization, .net for network, .us for U.S., .uk for United Kingdom, etc..

°(top level): DOMAIN [category ext.]
^(2nd level): NAME [address]
^(www) Subdomains
^(protocol) http://
» Domain Ext. Category, with an Address, creates a Root Domain Name.

As we register name addresses within an existing domain category ext., I concluded, we are not categorical 'domainers', but 2nd level 'namers'.
 

HotKey

Made in CanadaTop Contributor
Impact
10,425
And I suppose this is why we will never come to a consensus on what a domainer is.. :P

*edit* I name, therefore I domain. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
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biggie

GreenFriendly.comTop Contributor
Impact
14,708
And I suppose this is why we will never come to a consensus on what a domainer is.
HI

you don't have to come to a consensus, in domaining.

why?

because each individual has their own methods, strategies, capital, experience, etc.
which means there is no consensus for any of those particulars.

but the fact that you are a participant in the buying and transferring of domain names to other individuals for cash or other items of value...gives you option to call yourself a domainer.

this of course is only if you want to be associated with others, who use the adjective to describe the action of domaining.

however, should you use the adjective to assimilate in the group, then you are subject to be judged by your word, your posts, actions, ethics, morals, common sense, business sense and possibly the domains in your portfolio.

are you willing and able, can you handle it, and for how long?

imo...
 

JanviArora

New Member
Impact
0
A domainer is someone who specializes in buying and selling domains. They use various strategies, such as market analysis, to find which domains are most likely to be successful and profitable. Additionally, they may also sell or buy strategic names that will help them increase their web presence or improve the organic search results for their websites.
 

buydomainnames

Established Member
Impact
500
Not know exactly what domainer is , but domainer paralel with business practice , cause internet actually is real business