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The USA Political Thread

Located in The Break Room, started by lennco, Jul 20, 2012

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Who is to Blame for the Troubled US Economy?

  1. Both Parties

    196 votes
    47.1%
  2. Neither Party

    37 votes
    8.9%
  3. Democrats

    82 votes
    19.7%
  4. Republicans

    101 votes
    24.3%
Total: 416 vote(s)
  1. Domainace

    Domainace Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    The only resource they lack is oil, and how can the US cut that off? They can buy from Russia, Argentina and a number of other sources. It will get even easier for them as the petrodollar collapses. If anything, the USA might be the paper tiger. I wouldn't be surprised if China has the ability to shut down the grid anytime they want. They have spies and hackers all over the place, plenty of Americans ready to sell their country down the drain, and I can't see the American people tolerating the chaos China can sow. Look at how upset people get over toilet paper. Imagine no electricity.

    I am not trying to badmouth America, but I really think that most Americans are completely unaware how tenuous the country's position is. (That's JB's cue)
     
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  2. Cannuck

    Cannuck 420friendly.company VIP

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  3. GILSAN

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  4. mr-x

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  5. mr-x

    mr-x Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    China doesn't have a lot of steel. Most of their energy ( important ) is imported. They have been great at making deals in third world countries to obtain materials for infrastructure and cash. But their complicated supply chain makes them vulnerable.

    China does have a lot of spies. I posted a story about a professor being arrested in January for working with Chinese spies while also working for the US Gov on viruses. His assistant was a LT in the Chinese Army.

    Our power grid is antiquate but I don't think it would be easy to black out the entire country. The military doesn't rely on civilian power grids. The cost would be devastating to both countries. Kind of a mutual destruction deterrent I guess.

    USA has spent 8 trillion on wars in the last 20 years. China has been investing in their country but their navy is still no match for NATO. China has one military ally, North Korea.

    Don't think you are bagging on USA. In fact, no-one really knows how much China has infiltrated the USA. Think about the reaction of the NBA to a single coach supporting freedom for Hong Kong. They sold their integrity for a CHANCE to play basketball in China.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
  6. mr-x

    mr-x Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Read: China seizes Covid-19 advantage in South China Sea

    The lede: China ramps up military drills and energy exploitation in contested waterway while US military bogged down in virus crisis at home


    In recent days, China has conducted military drills and deployed large-scale military assets to the maritime area while at the same time officially celebrating strides made in exploiting disputed energy resources in the fossil fuel-rich sea.
    --

    I still cant' imagine why the Capt of the USS Theodore Roosevelt. aircraft carrier made his letter public. What a debacle.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
  7. mr-x

    mr-x Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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  8. Grilled

    Grilled Black Lives Matter VIP

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gin_and_tonic

     
  9. GILSAN

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  10. mr-x

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  11. SirDrago

    SirDrago NAME JEDI VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    giphy.gif
     
  12. .X.

    .X. In God I Trust VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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  13. .X.

    .X. In God I Trust VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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  14. GILSAN

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  15. GILSAN

    GILSAN Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Liberal Prayer...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. GILSAN

    GILSAN Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
  17. Domainace

    Domainace Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I think China has the definite edge here. Americans are used to the soft life - even poor Americans. Many Chinese people live in what we would call primitive conditions still, even in parts of the cities. Imagine mud floors (many have been upgraded to concrete), no air conditioning, the only heating being provided by a coal burning stove. Unreliable electricity. Hundreds of millions of people living this way. Those over 30 years old almost all remember much worse.

    If their grid goes down, they would just say "here we go again." I think Americans would just freak out and demand the problem be fixed. They would happily give up Taiwan to have their PS2 back. My opinion, of course.
     
  18. GILSAN

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  19. RogueWriter

    RogueWriter Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Eh, people and countries have underestimated America for generations, and they've always found out differently the hard way.
     
  20. Domainace

    Domainace Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Yes. But generations is not a very long time, and America today is a far different country from what it was. The way people are reacting to this virus is a good indicator, I would think.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
  21. Cannuck

    Cannuck 420friendly.company VIP

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    Agreed, and America has had a history of underestimating the enemy and found out the hard way (in this case Covid-19).
     
  22. Domainace

    Domainace Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    From "Complexity and Collapse: Empires on the Edge of Chaos," by Niall Ferguson...

    If empires are complex systems that sooner or later succumb to sudden and catastrophic malfunctions, rather than cycling sedately from Arcadia to Apogee to Armageddon, what are the implications for the United States today? First, debating the stages of decline may be a waste of time—it is a precipitous and unexpected fall that should most concern policymakers and citizens. Second, most imperial falls are associated with fiscal crises. All the above cases were marked by sharp imbalances between revenues and expenditures, as well as difficulties with financing public debt. Alarm bells should therefore be ringing very loudly, indeed, as the United States contemplates a deficit for 2009 of more than $1.4 trillion—about 11.2 percent of gdp, the biggest deficit in 60 years—and another for 2010 that will not be much smaller. Public debt, meanwhile, is set to more than double in the coming decade, from $5.8 trillion in 2008 to $14.3 trillion in 2019. Within the same timeframe, interest payments on that debt are forecast to leap from eight percent of federal revenues to 17 percent.

    These numbers are bad, but in the realm of political entities, the role of perception is just as crucial, if not more so. In imperial crises, it is not the material underpinnings of power that really matter but expectations about future power. The fiscal numbers cited above cannot erode U.S. strength on their own, but they can work to weaken a long-assumed faith in the United States’ ability to weather any crisis. For now, the world still expects the United States to muddle through, eventually confronting its problems when, as Churchill famously said, all the alternatives have been exhausted. Through this lens, past alarms about the deficit seem overblown, and 2080—when the U.S. debt may reach staggering proportions—seems a long way oª, leaving plenty of time to plug the fiscal hole. But one day, a seemingly random piece of bad news— perhaps a negative report by a rating agency—will make the headlines during an otherwise quiet news cycle. Suddenly, it will be not just a few policy wonks who worry about the sustainability of U.S. fiscal policy but also the public at large, not to mention investors abroad. It is this shift that is crucial: a complex adaptive system is in big trouble when its component parts lose faith in its viability."
     
  23. Cannuck

    Cannuck 420friendly.company VIP

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
  24. Domainace

    Domainace Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    That's just another Chinese fantasy. I remember how, for years after the Beatles, people kept waiting for the next Beatles to come along. They never did, because the Beatles were a unique product of their time and circumstances. Like the USA. No country is in a position now to be the next world power on the scale the US has achieved. And certainly, the Yuan will never be accepted as a global currency as things are. These are just the fantasies of the nasty little gang running (and ruining) China these days. Rather than make their country a better place, the harbor dreams of ruling the world. We know how that ends. We are beginning to see it now in America.
     
  25. GILSAN

    GILSAN Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Photo of a family wearing masks during the "Spanish flu" pandemic in 1918-1920, which actually started in the USA, but the poor Spaniards got blamed for it... forever, yet I'm still waiting to see if some Liberal journalist will start bitching about that fact...
    [​IMG]
     

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