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Identity.digital just released 21.155 Premium Domains, including chat.info!

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Hi folks,

I got an email from 101domain the other day that identity.digital is releasing some 21k premium domains which they kept locked - until now.

Facts:
  • Release Date: June 12, 17:00 UTC
  • Domains: 21.155
  • TLDs: 16 different (.poker, .bio, .black, .vote, .info, and so on)
  • Highlights:
    • 1-Character Domains, like: a, e, 0, 1, x!
    • 2-Character Domains, like: us, ai, we, do !
    • Geographic Domains, like california, lasvegas, nyc!
    • Short words, like chat!
  • Pricing: Obviously - very premium. Chat.info is currently at 3,1k reg/renewal. Others start at 150 reg/renewal. Prices are dropping during the early access phase which will end June 19th. Then the general availability phase will start.
  • Registrars: It seems only 101domain picked this up and changed their availability checking. For namecheap, for example, all domains are still 'taken'.

101domain provided a pdf in their email which you can download here: https://images.101domain.com/market...m/Identity-Digital-Premium-Domain-Release.pdf

-(Self-Promoted search tool removed by moderation)-

So, what is your favrouite domain? Did you pick any up?

My top 3
- chat.info
- ai.info
- 00.poker

Best

Till
 
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The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
Day 2: Prices did not fall yet. Most domains are still 1k+, with cap at $3,250.

I scan the availability of 21k domains multiple times per day. All domains are still available. It seems that either the registry is waiting for the end of the early access phase to update the whois information OR that no one is paying these fees.

I'll keep you posted.
 
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Thanks for sharing! The registration and renewal fees for these domains are very high! If you want to invest, you need to carefully calculate the risks and benefits!
 
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What exactly do you mean by "released"? Because all I see is "This premium domain is available for purchase. To register the domain, please contact [email protected]." which is the same status they've had for quite some time.

Ok, I see that *some* registrars participate in the early access. Others, like dynadot or godaddy, are holding off. Without publicity I don't think they will make many sales. And if the renewal will equal registration, I think they will make close to zero.
 
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How do we know that renewal prices will also be premium? There is no mention of that in the press release or on name.com page (linked from the press release). Also, why does name.com list totally different (tiered) prices than 101domain.com?
 
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How do we know that renewal prices will also be premium?

In my opinion the whole point of premium domains is for the registries to do an end-run around section 2.10c of the registry agreement, so assume they'll all be premium.

Another question that anyone considering these should be asking is what the renewal price is going to be next year or in 5 years or in 20 years. As far as I understand it, there are absolutely no guarantees once you've agreed to non-standard renewal pricing.

Also, why does name.com list totally different (tiered) prices than 101domain.com?

Yeah, that's weird. I checked a nn.info and it was $1250 USD on 101domain.com, but had a phased rollout with much higher prices on name.com.

There's added risk to those phased sale periods that almost no one understands. The whole process is opaque for registrants, so it's impossible to say when it's happening, but it's technically allowed. It's something that should be understood as a potential risk when registering a premium domain during a phased release.

RFC 8748 describes the Registry Fee Extension for EPP (aka non-standard pricing). Section 3.7 talks about classifications. Here's an interesting part about non-standard tiers:

3.7. Classification of Objects

...

If a server makes use of this element, it should provide clients with
a list of all the values that the element may take via an out-of-band
channel. Servers MUST NOT use values that do not appear on this
list.

...

It's describing what many domainers probably already know. Premium domains can have more than one tier. The interesting part is that it's a list that's made up by the registry, there are no limits on the size of the list, and the list can differ between registries.

I've seen speculation that premium domains can't be moved between premium tiers. My first question in that scenario is, how would you even know if your domain gets moved between tiers? No one is giving that information to registrants.

The potential risk that no one understands is that with a phased rollout you could be self selecting for a higher premium tier which is going to have a smaller number of registrants that will be considered less sensitive to price increases in the future.

To be clear, I'm not saying this is happening with the rollout posted about here, only that nothing forbids it.

Say you buy a 2 character domain in the first phase. You might end up in a tier for 2 character domains registered in phase 1; 2c-p1. The RFC quoted above has no constraints on the number of tiers a registry can create, so they could create a new tier for phase 2; 2c-p2. There could be another for phase 3, etc..

Now think about the number of registrants that would be in each tier. As the most expensive option, 2c-p1 is going to have fewer registrants than 2c-p2. If you end up in 2c-p1, think about the position you're in.
  • Your supplier, the registry, has monopoly power over you because they're the only one that can sell you a renewal.
  • You agreed to higher pricing at the time of initial registration and there's no fee schedule that limits price hikes.
  • You don't really have any price protections. Even if you're entitle to uniform pricing with others in your tier, which is debatable, it does nothing for you.
    • Will you ever know what tier your in?
    • Will you ever know what anyone else in your tier is paying?
    • No matter what, the registry can change prices for the whole tier at will.
  • The registry knows you have a lot of money to spend because you bought in phase 1.
  • Everyone else in your tier also has a lot of money to spend because they bought in phase 1.
  • There's a good chance you've made significant investments into other assets tied to your domain; websites, mailing lists, mobile apps.
  • Switching costs are high, or impossible for some things like PWAs.
  • If you decide to drop your domain, there's a good chance someone else will pay another large first year fee to renew it.
In my opinion that makes you a great target for price hikes. The registries can make as many promises as they want when it comes to renewal fees on premium domains, but promises aren't a guarantee and eventually someone making the decisions won't be able to resist the extra revenue they'll be able to get from increasing premium renewal fees.

Premium domains allow for a complex system of price discrimination because there are no constraints on the tier lists. I think very few registrants actually understand what they're getting when they register a premium domain. Registrants aren't privvy to the information needed to see how the registries are tiering premium domains and registrars might be bound by agreements with the registries that forbid them from disclosing enough information for anyone to call out the behavior.

Pricing classifications need to be added to WHOIS.

Buyer beware.
 
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Premium domains allow for a complex system of price discrimination

My favourite quote of the year! I would really, really want to see any of the registries applying arbitrary premium renewals defend it before the court. Has there been a case like that so far?
 
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Maybe some want to buy ...max 20-25 people , at 3250$ registration & each renew year same price 3250$
So basic 50 domains , hai 100 = 325 k

Money waste for investors if are not standard price
 
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Anytime I see some sort and sort are releasing names at some sort of premium, I sort of ignore. Domainers are the only sort that should be determining premium.

Registrars jobs are to base-reg, point blank.
 
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I would really, really want to see any of the registries applying arbitrary premium renewals defend it before the court. Has there been a case like that so far?

Who would take them to court?
 
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I am not dealing with any registry "premium" nonsense.

Higher prices for extensions with less demand. Pass.

Brad
 
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In my opinion the whole point of premium domains is for the registries to do an end-run around section 2.10c of the registry agreement, so assume they'll all be premium.

Another question that anyone considering these should be asking is what the renewal price is going to be next year or in 5 years or in 20 years. As far as I understand it, there are absolutely no guarantees once you've agreed to non-standard renewal pricing.



Yeah, that's weird. I checked a nn.info and it was $1250 USD on 101domain.com, but had a phased rollout with much higher prices on name.com.

There's added risk to those phased sale periods that almost no one understands. The whole process is opaque for registrants, so it's impossible to say when it's happening, but it's technically allowed. It's something that should be understood as a potential risk when registering a premium domain during a phased release.

RFC 8748 describes the Registry Fee Extension for EPP (aka non-standard pricing). Section 3.7 talks about classifications. Here's an interesting part about non-standard tiers:



It's describing what many domainers probably already know. Premium domains can have more than one tier. The interesting part is that it's a list that's made up by the registry, there are no limits on the size of the list, and the list can differ between registries.

I've seen speculation that premium domains can't be moved between premium tiers. My first question in that scenario is, how would you even know if your domain gets moved between tiers? No one is giving that information to registrants.

The potential risk that no one understands is that with a phased rollout you could be self selecting for a higher premium tier which is going to have a smaller number of registrants that will be considered less sensitive to price increases in the future.

To be clear, I'm not saying this is happening with the rollout posted about here, only that nothing forbids it.

Say you buy a 2 character domain in the first phase. You might end up in a tier for 2 character domains registered in phase 1; 2c-p1. The RFC quoted above has no constraints on the number of tiers a registry can create, so they could create a new tier for phase 2; 2c-p2. There could be another for phase 3, etc..

Now think about the number of registrants that would be in each tier. As the most expensive option, 2c-p1 is going to have fewer registrants than 2c-p2. If you end up in 2c-p1, think about the position you're in.
  • Your supplier, the registry, has monopoly power over you because they're the only one that can sell you a renewal.
  • You agreed to higher pricing at the time of initial registration and there's no fee schedule that limits price hikes.
  • You don't really have any price protections. Even if you're entitle to uniform pricing with others in your tier, which is debatable, it does nothing for you.
    • Will you ever know what tier your in?
    • Will you ever know what anyone else in your tier is paying?
    • No matter what, the registry can change prices for the whole tier at will.
  • The registry knows you have a lot of money to spend because you bought in phase 1.
  • Everyone else in your tier also has a lot of money to spend because they bought in phase 1.
  • There's a good chance you've made significant investments into other assets tied to your domain; websites, mailing lists, mobile apps.
  • Switching costs are high, or impossible for some things like PWAs.
  • If you decide to drop your domain, there's a good chance someone else will pay another large first year fee to renew it.
In my opinion that makes you a great target for price hikes. The registries can make as many promises as they want when it comes to renewal fees on premium domains, but promises aren't a guarantee and eventually someone making the decisions won't be able to resist the extra revenue they'll be able to get from increasing premium renewal fees.

Premium domains allow for a complex system of price discrimination because there are no constraints on the tier lists. I think very few registrants actually understand what they're getting when they register a premium domain. Registrants aren't privvy to the information needed to see how the registries are tiering premium domains and registrars might be bound by agreements with the registries that forbid them from disclosing enough information for anyone to call out the behavior.

Pricing classifications need to be added to WHOIS.

Buyer beware.
Excellent analysis
 
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I confirmed directly with a participating registrar that these domains will have a premium renewal equal to the registration price.
 
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Some updates:

1) All domains are still available.

2) I also got confirmation that registration price equals renewal price.

3) Further, from Netim (https://blog.netim.com/en/domain-na...maines-released-an-opportunity-to-catch-12203):

This release involves an early access phase (Early Access Program or EAP) with a system of degressive Premium rates.

Each EAP phase starts at 17:00 UTC:

  • EAP 3: from 14th to 15th June
  • EAP 4: from 15th to 16th June
  • EAP 5-7: from 16th to 19th June
  • GA: 19th June
Prices will drop every two days, starting today 17:00 utc.
 
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I confirmed directly with a participating registrar that these domains will have a premium renewal equal to the registration price.

2) I also got confirmation that registration price equals renewal price.

How are the registrars allowed to say that, and advertise it, when they don't set the prices? I realize that domainers might understand the renewal prices can change, but, in my experience, the average consumer thinks that's the forever price.

But even if you understand that renewal prices can change, what's the thinking when registering premium domains? Who's the end-of-the-line retail buyer that's going to invest into building something on a domain with undefined renewal pricing?
 
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But even if you understand that renewal prices can change, what's the thinking when registering premium domains? Who's the end-of-the-line retail buyer that's going to invest into building something on a domain with undefined renewal pricing?

For me, premium renewal is a deal breaker. I might buy a domain for "premium" registration price if the renewal is standard, just like I would buy a domain from the market. But premium renewals? No, thanks. It's basically racket.
 
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The first domains were registered (name | reg & renewal):
- cr.bio (2,250 USD)
- list.info (140 USD)
- f.red ( 1,250 USD)
- ja.red (1,250 USD)

Two lovely domain hacks!
 
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Newly registered domains:
- ai.info
- ai.blue
- franchise.info

Registrations prices - contrary to announced - have not dropped yet.
 
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Newly registered domains:
- e.vote
- miami.info
- orlando.info
- usa.info

Registrations prices - contrary to announced - have still not dropped yet. Today is the last day of the early access phase. Let's see how prices drop afterwards.
 
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am I the only one registering these?? am I crazy? I thought I won the lottery when I saw that everything was still available today... I got IN.BIO and IP.INFO and couldn't be happier. which I had more cash to spend

Posted my favorites here:
 
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Today is the last day of the early access phase. Let's see how prices drop afterwards.
I guess I got the email right when pricess dropped at 17:00 UTC.
 
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am I the only one registering these?? am I crazy? I thought I won the lottery when I saw that everything was still available today... I got IN.BIO and IP.INFO and couldn't be happier. which I had more cash to spend

Do you plan to sell them or develop them? The renewal fee looks pretty hefty on ip.info. The pool of potential buyers must be much smaller for something like that, so what if you have to carry it for a long time?

In general, what are aftermarket sales like for domains with premium renewals? I see enough for sale that I'm curious how it works.
 
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