NameSilo

I lose $42,000 on an escrow.com transaction as pdd.com, help please.

Labeled as warning in Warnings and Alerts started by American, Jan 9, 2018.

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  1. xynames

    xynames XYNames.com PRO VIP

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    escrow.com will cooperate with any law enforcement who contact them - doesn't mean that the police will follow up or do anything, unfortunately.
     
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  2. American

    American Established Member

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    networksolutions.com don't allowed transfer any domain out before you hold it for 60 days.
     
  3. anantj

    anantj Top Member VIP

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    Nope. Ask this question to those who've been defrauded or (hopefully not) when you have been.
     
  4. MapleDots

    MapleDots Domain Properties 2010 - 2019 VIP

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    Nothing is foolproof, even Brincks trucks get held up. There is always someone willing to risk everything for a dishonest buck. If you think everything is foolproof then you need to get rid of your credit cards. We hope and pray that we are never part of fraud but unfortunately it does happen. You cannot condemn a whole payment system like escrow for a few bad apples.

    With each security breach they probably learn something and hopefully put in a protocol to prevent similar in the future.

    Am I idealistic? Yes.... but that is the Canadian in me
     
  5. Domains - Wanted

    Domains - Wanted Top Member VIP

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    Doesn't this last - lack of notification to OP about the unauthorized transfer out of the domain from OP's account, no matter the justification - open Netsol to some liability for OP's loss due to OP's inability to take action in a timely matter?

    In fraud cases, timing is all important. I believe it could be argued that NetSol's practice of not notifying buyers of stolen domains of such a determination (at sole discretion by NetSol), makes NetSol complicit in the act. Inadvertantly, to be sure, but still...?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  6. anantj

    anantj Top Member VIP

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    I agree (and also agree with the earlier comment). Nothing is foolproof.

    TBH, I'm not condemning Escrow.com. Given what I've read about them, I don't really have to. They're managing their own reputation very well themselves that we don't have to help them along (</sarcasm>). There is, however, a lot more that can and should be done for victims of fraud. As @jberryhill described earlier in this thread, having to spend a boatload of money to recover money that might be all that someone has or that someone can afford at a given point is not right and should change. Solutions? I don't really have any myself though
     
  7. offthehandle

    offthehandle . Gold Account VIP

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    Exactly. Ever been robbed at gunpoint? The cops come out and take a report, then roll their eyes since they heard the same story so many times before, and go out to the donut shop. There is no investigation. Nothing happens. Nothing unfortunately will happen like John Berryhill says. The amount while is significant, it isn't really significant enough to chase all over or cost effective. OP should hire some of his own internet investigators (should be some sleuths here on Namepros) or outside people to locate the scammer himself. Sad situation for OP. Sorry to read this. I have been fleeced before too, I am sure most people have been in their own business, it's unfortunately part of being in business and the risk.
     
  8. Kate

    Kate Domainosaurus Rex VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    @American

    Even if escrow.com will not release data without a court order, based on my own (past) experience Netsol may release some info like IP addresses.
    About the thread on another forum that I mentioned earlier, the victim of a domain theft registered on the forum and he posted the IP address he got from Netsol, then the admin looked into the forum control panel and he found an exact match associated to a forum member. That member was so confident he did not even bother to cover his tracks. He hijacked the domain from his home connection.

    Also, since it appears you have been in direct contact with the thief by E-mail you should inspect the mail headers. They may show some information like originating IP addresses. You never know.

    At least he has a PGP key have you noticed :) I am surprised that services like escrow.com do not encourage the practice, at least for those who already use PGP.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  9. 1Darko

    1Darko Top Member VIP

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    I agree with that one. Today the world is "smaller" than some decades ago. Good connected private investigators can track down people all over the world and OP should think about that option too.
    Kudos to @jberryhill for his detailed explanations!(y)
     
  10. American

    American Established Member

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    He uses a proxy server
     
  11. Grilled

    Grilled khjasdhkfdhdskfhhukdfshkj VIP

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    How do you know?
     
  12. Kate

    Kate Domainosaurus Rex VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Proxy or VPN ? Logs may still be available.
     
  13. domainer111

    domainer111 Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Very nasty, you will have to use legal enforcement to get your rights. I got hit by a scammer last year who cancelled on a big platform, you've just got to give these the seven days.
     
  14. .NJ

    .NJ Top Member VIP

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    @American

    Did you use someone elses escrow account to complete the transaction?

    Or did you use your own escrow account?
     
  15. American

    American Established Member

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    yes,i used my friend id.
     
  16. American

    American Established Member

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    In the mail, his time zone appears UTC + 2: 00, but his ip address is the United States, which is obviously impossible.
     
  17. MapleDots

    MapleDots Domain Properties 2010 - 2019 VIP

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    You used someone else's id for a transaction of this size?

    Yikes!.. good luck with that.
     
  18. .NJ

    .NJ Top Member VIP

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    1.So you used someone else's escrow accout to complete a $42,000 transaction.

    2. The domain gets transfered to an account that doesn't match the escrow account.

    3. You try and contact escrow and netsol for help.

    4. Do you see how this looks on your end?
     
  19. American

    American Established Member

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    [QUOTE =“。NJ,post:6516678,member:188954”] 1.您用其他人的托管账户完成了$ 42,000的交易。

    2.域被转移到与托管账户不匹配的账户。

    你试着联系托管和netsol寻求帮助。

    你有没有看到这是你的目的?[/ QUOTE]
    escrow.com already contact me,web.com also give me back,but just told me wait.
     
  20. DN_Hunter

    DN_Hunter Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    This is a great thread and I've learned a lot -- so thank you for all the great feedback @jberryhill, @TERADOMAIN, @BrandonAbbey, @Jackson Elsegood and everyone for their experience and insight!

    Has anyone contacted SEDO for information about the "other" domain name that appears to be purchased from the same seller (based on name and email address)? Perhaps SEDO would be willing to look into that seller's account to see if anything looks suspicious. Maybe that seller's account at SEDO has other stolen domain names that need to be prevented from selling immediately until this gets resolved.

    Regards,
    DN
     
  21. domainventure

    domainventure Top Member VIP

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    One of the finest ships to set sail at the time, the RMS Titanic, got sunk by an iceberg. A narrative, albeit a sad one, got sullied by a borrowed ID, doesn't make the loss any better, but should have thought twice to use borrowed ID, especially on such a large transaction.
    May you get enough sales to cover your losses and beyond!
     
  22. MapleDots

    MapleDots Domain Properties 2010 - 2019 VIP

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    This story just gets better and better and I will assure you the op will continue to have losses with poor business practices like this. OMG this is an entire topic about what things NOT to do in a purchase or sale. The op needs to let someone else handle their business affairs in the future.

    All I can say to the op is..... moving forward, hire a qualified broker or representative because when it comes to business your reasoning and judgement leaves a lot to be desired!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  23. jberryhill

    jberryhill Top Member John Berryhill, Ph.d., Esq. VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    From Netsol's perspective, there is no meaningful distinction between "buyer of a stolen domain name" and "person who stole the domain name". Two apparently stolen domain names were transferred to an account. What conclusion might someone reach if stolen cars keep ending up in your garage?

    And, assuming everything is as it appears here, what difference would it make if Netsol had contacted the person who received the stolen domain name?

    One simple question Netsol might ask is, "If you bought the domain name, where did the payment go?" The buyer doesn't know.

    Another scenario consistent with the facts is that two friends steal a domain name which has fallen into disuse. Perhaps the registrant organization has gone out of business or otherwise wouldn't notice or care if the domain name was taken. In the course of stealing the name, they engage in a sham Escrow.com transaction in order to make it look like the thief was a defrauded victim in the event that the original registrant notices.

    As Teradomain suggests, if we assume that everything posted at drjw.com is legit, we have a domain transfer from "Frank Slakmon" to "Lou Zhiyong", and an Escrow transaction between "Patrick Sitrock" and "Ye Tian".

    So, if one considers the material posted at that site, one might ask the basic question of :

    "How does 'Ye Tian' paying 'Patrick Sitrock' suggest that 'Lou Zhiyong' bought a domain name from 'Frank Slakmon'?"

    There are some other oddities in the material posted at drjw.com. The first is that the "buyer" is apparently aware that the original registrant admin contact was [email protected]. Looking at the second Dec. 13th email, and the posted WHOIS history, the "buyer" states that the domain name was restored "to the original owner". If the buyer knew that [email protected] was the email address of "the original owner" (and the buyer clearly has access to WHOIS history data) does it strike you as odd that neither the escrow transaction or the domain transfer involved "the original owner" which was apparently known to the buyer?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  24. Premiums

    Premiums find.ventures

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  25. jberryhill

    jberryhill Top Member John Berryhill, Ph.d., Esq. VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Just out of curiosity, I usually use domaintools and domainiq for WHOIS history data. Does anyone recognize the screenshot used for the whois history posted at drjw.com, and what site that might have come from?
     

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