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discuss Examining the Authenticity of Reported .AI Domain Name Sales and the Need for Regulatory Oversight in the Domain Name Aftermarket!

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The recent surge in reported .AI domain name sales has raised some eyebrows in the domain name aftermarket industry. While the popularity of artificial intelligence has undoubtedly contributed to the increased interest in .AI domains, there are concerns about the genuineness of these reported sales. Additionally, the current state of the domain name aftermarket raises questions about the need for regulatory oversight and the potential for market manipulation. Let's dive into these issues and explore the topic further.

  1. Two-Year Registration Requirement: Why is the .AI domain name registry mandating a two-year registration period, despite the high annual pricing? Does this requirement suggest an attempt to artificially inflate registration numbers and create a sense of demand?
  2. Lack of Transparency: Have there been any efforts by the registry or registering platforms to provide transparent data on the actual sales figures and the parties involved in these transactions? The absence of clear and verifiable information may raise suspicions about the authenticity of the reported sales.
  3. Role of Established Agents: Is there a possibility that the registry and registering platforms are collaborating with established agents in the domain name aftermarket to orchestrate these sales? If so, what would be the motivations behind such actions, and how can the industry ensure fair play and prevent market manipulation?
  4. Comparative Analysis: How do the reported .AI domain name sales compare to other popular top-level domains (TLDs) in terms of volume, pricing, and overall market trends? Analyzing these factors may help determine whether the .AI sales are indeed genuine or if there are any anomalies that suggest otherwise.
  5. Long-Term Sustainability: Considering the current hype surrounding .AI domains, what are the long-term prospects for this TLD? Will the demand for .AI domains continue to grow organically, or is there a risk of a bubble that may eventually burst, leaving investors with overpriced assets?
  6. Regulatory Oversight: Why hasn't ICANN, the regulatory body overseeing the domain name industry, intervened in the matter of .AI domain sales? Is there a need for stricter monitoring and enforcement of rules to prevent potential market manipulation and ensure a level playing field for all participants?
  7. Developmental Progress: If .AI domains are truly beneficial for startups in the artificial intelligence sector, how many of the highly sold .AI domain names have actually been developed into functional websites or platforms? The lack of visible development and utilization of these domains may further fuel doubts about the authenticity of the reported sales.
  8. Authenticity of Domain Name Sales: Are the real sales of domain names taking place, or is it a game between registering platforms and their agents? The growing focus and investment by domain name registering platforms on catering to domain investors and customizing their platforms accordingly raise concerns about the genuineness of the sales.
  9. Need for Regulating Platforms: Should there be a regulating platform to control the present secondary domain name platforms, especially in light of the increasing customization of these platforms for bot registration and after-sales? The lack of oversight and regulation in the domain name aftermarket may create opportunities for manipulation and unfair practices.
  10. Monopolistic Market Structure: Why are aftermarket domain names functioning in a monopolistic market structure, and why are capitalist anti-competitive agencies not intervening in the domain sales market? The concentration of power and lack of competition in the domain name aftermarket may lead to price distortions and limit opportunities for smaller players.
  11. Speculative Asset Market: Is the domain name aftermarket becoming a speculative asset market, similar to cryptocurrencies and NFTs, where registering agencies and their so-called agents exploit innocent innovators? The potential for speculation and manipulation in the domain name market may hinder genuine innovation and growth in the industry.
These issues need to be discussed urgently within the NamePros.com community and the broader domain name industry. It is crucial for all stakeholders, including registries, registrars, investors, and regulatory bodies, to engage in open and transparent conversations to address these concerns. By promoting transparency, implementing effective regulatory measures, and fostering fair competition, we can ensure the long-term health and sustainability of the domain name market. It is time for the industry to come together and take proactive steps to protect the interests of all participants and maintain the integrity of the domain name ecosystem.
 
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Or... Google it and have 94% of your questions answered.
 
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The recent surge in reported .AI domain name sales has raised some eyebrows in the domain name aftermarket industry. While the popularity of artificial intelligence has undoubtedly contributed to the increased interest in .AI domains, there are concerns about the genuineness of these reported sales. Additionally, the current state of the domain name aftermarket raises questions about the need for regulatory oversight and the potential for market manipulation. Let's dive into these issues and explore the topic further.

  1. Two-Year Registration Requirement: Why is the .AI domain name registry mandating a two-year registration period, despite the high annual pricing? Does this requirement suggest an attempt to artificially inflate registration numbers and create a sense of demand?
  2. Lack of Transparency: Have there been any efforts by the registry or registering platforms to provide transparent data on the actual sales figures and the parties involved in these transactions? The absence of clear and verifiable information may raise suspicions about the authenticity of the reported sales.
  3. Role of Established Agents: Is there a possibility that the registry and registering platforms are collaborating with established agents in the domain name aftermarket to orchestrate these sales? If so, what would be the motivations behind such actions, and how can the industry ensure fair play and prevent market manipulation?
  4. Comparative Analysis: How do the reported .AI domain name sales compare to other popular top-level domains (TLDs) in terms of volume, pricing, and overall market trends? Analyzing these factors may help determine whether the .AI sales are indeed genuine or if there are any anomalies that suggest otherwise.
  5. Long-Term Sustainability: Considering the current hype surrounding .AI domains, what are the long-term prospects for this TLD? Will the demand for .AI domains continue to grow organically, or is there a risk of a bubble that may eventually burst, leaving investors with overpriced assets?
  6. Regulatory Oversight: Why hasn't ICANN, the regulatory body overseeing the domain name industry, intervened in the matter of .AI domain sales? Is there a need for stricter monitoring and enforcement of rules to prevent potential market manipulation and ensure a level playing field for all participants?
  7. Developmental Progress: If .AI domains are truly beneficial for startups in the artificial intelligence sector, how many of the highly sold .AI domain names have actually been developed into functional websites or platforms? The lack of visible development and utilization of these domains may further fuel doubts about the authenticity of the reported sales.
  8. Authenticity of Domain Name Sales: Are the real sales of domain names taking place, or is it a game between registering platforms and their agents? The growing focus and investment by domain name registering platforms on catering to domain investors and customizing their platforms accordingly raise concerns about the genuineness of the sales.
  9. Need for Regulating Platforms: Should there be a regulating platform to control the present secondary domain name platforms, especially in light of the increasing customization of these platforms for bot registration and after-sales? The lack of oversight and regulation in the domain name aftermarket may create opportunities for manipulation and unfair practices.
  10. Monopolistic Market Structure: Why are aftermarket domain names functioning in a monopolistic market structure, and why are capitalist anti-competitive agencies not intervening in the domain sales market? The concentration of power and lack of competition in the domain name aftermarket may lead to price distortions and limit opportunities for smaller players.
  11. Speculative Asset Market: Is the domain name aftermarket becoming a speculative asset market, similar to cryptocurrencies and NFTs, where registering agencies and their so-called agents exploit innocent innovators? The potential for speculation and manipulation in the domain name market may hinder genuine innovation and growth in the industry.
These issues need to be discussed urgently within the NamePros.com community and the broader domain name industry. It is crucial for all stakeholders, including registries, registrars, investors, and regulatory bodies, to engage in open and transparent conversations to address these concerns. By promoting transparency, implementing effective regulatory measures, and fostering fair competition, we can ensure the long-term health and sustainability of the domain name market. It is time for the industry to come together and take proactive steps to protect the interests of all participants and maintain the integrity of the domain name ecosystem.
I hope we stop these ChatGPT type of posts at NP.
 
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I hope we stop these ChatGPT type of posts at NP.


Please try to understand the core issues if you are rational enough without beating around the bush! Do you know how many innocent investors have gone bankrupt due to fake sales campaigns and speculation? Speculation is also a big threat to the sustainability of the domaining industry. If you're not one of the inside domain traders, you'll understand the real issues instead of making such insignificant comments!
 
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Please try to understand the core issues if you are rational enough without beating around the bush! Do you know how many innocent investors have gone bankrupt due to fake sales campaigns and speculation? Speculation is also a big threat to the sustainability of the domaining industry.
Well, you have some important points in your post. These issues are not unique to .ai. And there appear to be significant hurdles to having transparency of sales and oversight that are understandable.

I was surprised to learn that India placed significant restrictions on the use of their cc tld. One would wonder if other tlds may make radical changes in the future, including unique restrictions on sales and transfers? These are changing times for domain investors as well as registrars and registries.
 
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6. Regulatory Oversight: Why hasn't ICANN, the regulatory body overseeing the domain name industry, intervened in the matter of .AI domain sales? Is there a need for stricter monitoring and enforcement of rules to prevent potential market manipulation and ensure a level playing field for all participants?

Your ChatGPT-ish post lost credibility at point #6.

.AI is the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Anguilla. ccTLDs are managed by their respective countries or territories. ICANN's influence on specific policies within ccTLDs is often limited.

Limited Direct Control:
  • Delegation: ICANN is primarily responsible for delegating ccTLDs to designated managers, who are typically organizations or government-linked entities within the respective country or territory.
  • Technical Standards: ICANN works to ensure ccTLDs adhere to technical standards important for the overall security and stability of the internet.
  • IANA Function: ICANN maintains the IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) function, which includes a central database of root zone information. This is essential for ensuring the top-level of the internet's naming structure works, including ccTLDs.
Areas Where ICANN's Control is Limited:
  • Internal Policy: ccTLD managers largely determine their own internal policies regarding domain registration, how to handle disputes, and other operational aspects. ICANN generally doesn't intervene in these areas.
  • No Contractual Authority: Unlike with generic top-level domains (gTLDs, like .com or .org), ICANN doesn't have direct contractual authority over ccTLDs to enforce compliance in the same way.
Cooperation and Accountability:
  • Frameworks & Agreements: ICANN often has accountability frameworks, letters of exchange, or other less formal agreements outlining specific responsibilities and areas of cooperation with ccTLD managers.
  • Community Participation: ccTLD managers usually participate in ICANN processes and meetings. This fosters collaboration, even where ICANN may not have direct control.
  • Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC): The GAC within ICANN provides a platform for governments to give advice on public policy matters including issues related to ccTLDs.
Why the Limited Control?

The sovereignty of countries and territories is a major reason for ICANN's limited control over ccTLDs. ccTLDs are seen as an extension of a nation's online identity, and governments often wish to maintain a high degree of control over their management to reflect local needs and policies.

Please try to understand the core issues if you are rational enough without beating around the bush!

Stephen Colbert Hiding GIF by The Late Show With Stephen Colbert
 
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Is this the new xyz conspiracy?
 
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Well, you have some important points in your post. These issues are not unique to .ai. And there appear to be significant hurdles to having transparency of sales and oversight that are understandable.

I was surprised to learn that India placed significant restrictions on the use of their cc tld. One would wonder if other tlds may make radical changes in the future, including unique restrictions on sales and transfers? These are changing times for domain investors as well as registrars and registries.
Yes, you are correct. I assume that, as you mentioned, certain restrictions can be expected in the near future, especially in the case of ccTLDs. We must remember that .AI is also a ccTLD. India's decision to restrict .IN sales in the secondary market is widely accepted from an entrepreneurial perspective. India is the largest emerging economy in the world, so such decisions are very important from an economic policy perspective. As you said, such restrictions can be replicated in other economies.

The fact is that this industry is highly speculative and non-transparent these days, as many malpractices and illicit transactions occur due to a certain degree of unregulation. Therefore, many fraudulent players are engaged in it to spoil the entire industry, especially in the case of new-generation domain extensions. If you look into certain comments in the NP and promotion of such insignificant comments and posts, it will give you a clear message about who the culprits are.

There is also a higher probability that certain ccTLDs are not allowed to be browsed in certain other countries. If my knowledge is correct, even now such restrictions exist in certain countries. If practices like these become widespread in the future, extensions like .AI could be banned in many countries. The major problem to be discussed here is why the .AI registry is trying to reap windfall gains like any other speculators, charging higher prices and mandating two-year registrations. The higher sales price of .AI extensions also lacks transparency and is doubtful.
 
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Is this the new xyz conspiracy?

Not sure if it's conspiracy or reality. You can feel it yourself once you invest and experience the real outcome.
 
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The higher sales price of .AI extensions also lacks transparency and is doubtful.
Which ones lack transparency, be specific. Drop a list with your next post and I'm sure NP members can go thru it and look into them.

Why doubtful when AI is hot right now.
 
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Not sure if it's conspiracy or reality. You can feel it yourself once you invest and experience the real outcome.

Ahhh... This thread starts to make sense when you look at OP's previous posts.

-- Seller regs junk AI names
-- Tries to sell on nP
-- Domain doesn't sell
-- Therefore all AI domains must be a conspiracy
 
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Ahhh... This thread starts to make sense when you look at OP's previous posts.

-- Seller regs junk AI names
-- Tries to sell on nP
-- Domain doesn't sell
-- Therefore all AI domains must be a conspiracy

A tale as old as time itself.
 
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Ahhh... This thread starts to make sense when you look at OP's previous posts.

-- Seller regs junk AI names
-- Tries to sell on nP
-- Domain doesn't sell
-- Therefore all AI domains must be a conspiracy
What a failure you are! You don't even have a single significant point put forward here. Instead, you demoralize the genuine concerns of investors and try to redirect the discussion. It's quite unfortunate to see that speculators and fraudulent agents of registry are dominating here, behaving like a mafia against those who raise genuine concerns about certain issues. I think there is no meaning in debating productive issues here to protect healthy investors. It's really a waste of time to discuss significant issues with psychic frogs! Sorry NP.
 
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It's really a waste of time to discuss significant issues with psychic frogs!

The agitated ripple disturbs the pond's reflection. Anger clouds the future, obscuring truth from fear. Take a deep breath, friend. It is not the frog who has failed.

Frog Funny Dancing GIF by Mountain Dew


*Ribbit*
 
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Admittedly, I had been interested in some of the catchy cc tlds, such as .me and .tv, and even tried a few .xyz. Unlike the .com/.net/.org, domain security and spam issues appeared with some of these.

Investigating further, there were alerts on cybersecurity sites about some cctlds being used for spam and more nefarious matters. PaloAltoNetworks, incidentally, had some useful reports relating to this in their threats research section and their free cybersecurity newsletters.

Since dropping anything other than .net, .com, and .org, I stopped researching this issue. So, are there any cybersecurity or spam issues with .ai recently?
 
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Admittedly, I had been interested in some of the catchy cc tlds, such as .me and .tv, and even tried a few .xyz. Unlike the .com/.net/.org, I found that domain security ratings concerns appeared with these extensions. And there was discussion on some of the cybersecurity sites about some cctlds being a real issue with spam and more nefarious uses.

Has this been an issue at all with .ai as well?
There's probably a chance for it. Many nations have started to seriously look into AI-related developments and their consequences on their economies. Also, it seems that many spam sites are emerging these days, claiming to be AI-based initiatives, which go against the domestic interests and sovereignty of countries. In this context, what you said is correct, and there is a higher probability of getting banned in certain well-developed countries.

Even now, certain countries like India have banned established .com-based websites for security reasons. For example, dynadot.com, afternic.com, and dan.com are inaccessible from certain IPs. Due to this issue, Dynadot now uses a different name in India: ddot.in.
 
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Admittedly, I had been interested in some of the catchy cc tlds, such as .me and .tv, and even tried a few .xyz. Unlike the .com/.net/.org, domain security and spam issues appeared with some of these.

Investigating further, there were alerts on cybersecurity sites about some cctlds being used for spam and more nefarious matters. PaloAltoNetworks, incidentally, had some useful reports relating to this in their threats research section and their free cybersecurity newsletters.

Since dropping anything other than .net, .com, and .org, I stopped researching this issue. So, are there any cybersecurity or spam issues with .ai recently?

No. The main reason for those issues were cheap promos (99c xyz for example) that let spammers registers tons of names for nothing.

The high price of ai names will keep *most* low level abuse like this to a minimum.
 
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No. The main reason for those issues were cheap promos (99c xyz for example) that let spammers registers tons of names for nothing.

The high price of ai names will keep *most* low level abuse like this to a minimum.
Thanks for clarifying that about .ai. So basically the higher prices can help protect the integrity of a Tld. That's good to know.
 
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Please try to understand the core issues if you are rational enough without beating around the bush! Do you know how many innocent investors have gone bankrupt due to fake sales campaigns and speculation? Speculation is also a big threat to the sustainability of the domaining industry. If you're not one of the inside domain traders, you'll understand the real issues instead of making such insignificant comments!
You are aware that domaining = speculation?
 
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I am confused - are you upset by the high pricing?
think there is real manipulation?
or fed up you missed out?
 
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