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question Would selling a domain name still in 60 day lock be a deal breaker for end users?

Dynadot

peace800

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If you start doing outbound on a domain still within the 60 day transfer period and you then tell the end user that they would have to create an account at your registrar in order to have it pushed before then, would this put them off?

Is it better to promote the domain after 60 days?
 

WeSell-Domains

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I think in most cases that marketing a domain name then telling an interested end user they will have to create an account with the registrar would send red flags to the buyer. I prefer to wait for the lock to expire. Exceptions are when the end user contacts me first with an inquiry. Then it's okay to explain the lock.
 

Abhikrishna

Established Member
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I have told lots of buyers to open an account and pushed the domain to them. It's usually no big deal. They can always transfer anywhere they want after 60 days and have control of the domain immediately anyway.
only godaddy locks the domain for 60 days? or all other registrys also? like namecheap, namebright?
 
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I prefer to wait for the lock to expire. Exceptions are when the end user contacts me first with an inquiry. Then it's okay to explain the lock.

totally agree

also, when you're trying to upsell a fresh hand reg that's still locked, and the reasons why, become known to buyer,
then that info could cause them to reconsider purchasing or question why you're asking so much for name.

this happens quite often and if you're not prepared to justify asking price, then you may lose a sale or sell for less than expected.

so, yeah, timing plays it's part and if played at right time, one can avoid this potential situation, to not, be in.


imo...
 
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I weigh in with those who say wait the 60 days before outbound. Even though setting up a free account on a registrar is not a big deal, and they can easily transfer it from there to another account if they want later, I think for those not technically inclined it is a roadblock (particularly if the registrar is not one of the big retail ones like GoDaddy and Namecheap).

I often list a domain name on the registrar marketplace during the first 60 days, since a sale there is not an issue, but I do not list it on Undeveloped or Afternic etc. until the 60 days is up.
 
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If you have your own website, I think if you have a desirable name it might be effective to list it there right off with a note like "Available Oct 5 - open to offers now" this might give potential purchasers a sense of urgency like a home about to come on the market in real estate. And if someone really wants it urgently, at the point they make contact you could point out the push option. Realistically, very few domain names will sell in the first 60 days anyway (says he who just sold one within the 60 day period of registration, but it was done through a registrar marketplace sale; I think that was the first time I have had a sale holding a name less than 60 days.)
 

Pedro Santos

DOTONOMIC.COM
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The few outbound sales I've made were actually all, or almost all of them, within the 60 days period... and it didn't even occur to me to mention it to the buyers in advance.. I only told them I needed them to have/create accounts at those registrars after we had agreed on a price, and even then I didn't mention the transfer lock, nor did they ask any questions. My sample size is pretty small though...
 

Bannen

Don't say Huh? too much; pretend you understand.
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I find that it's only an issue for the smaller sales. If someone wants a domain to the tune of paying thousands $$ then they're serious enough to not be scared/annoyed off by having to spend 5 minutes setting up an account with a new registrar. I've never lost a larger sale by asking the buyer to set up that account.

However, with smaller sales it's been hit-or-miss. If they're buying a domain for xx or xxx, then if they're only 'lukewarm' on the domain, sometimes they just feel it's not worth the bother to open an account with a new registrar. Again, if they love the domain (and they don't feel they are being scammed), it's been no problem opening the new account.

I just lost a sale over the weekend. Did outbound Friday for a domain, priced at $650, buyer said they were interested and let's proceed. When I mentioned they needed to open an account with the current registrar, I didn't hear back. I followed up Monday, they responded that they're no longer interested. It's a case where, if the domain had been ready to transfer instantly, I expect I'd have transferred it right away and I'd have a sale.

The new-registrar-account thing sometimes kills a sale outright; sometimes it just makes them put off the purchase for awhile, and during that put-off period they change their minds (which is what happened with this non-sale I just mentioned); and sometimes it doesn't deter them at all because they're hot for the domain no matter what.

To sum up:
1. - I find it's never been an issue, when it's a larger sale (x,xxx and up).
2. - I find it's an issue occasionally, when it's a smaller sale (xxx)

Lately I almost never do outbound for *smaller domain sales*, until that domain is past the 60 day lock period. The exception is with Godaddy domains; if I have it at GD, almost every end user seems to use GD, or know who they are, so any domain I get through GD I feel is safe to start outbounding right away.

The above is my personal experience; others might have different results.

:)
 

Pedro Santos

DOTONOMIC.COM
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I guess the particular registrar where the domain is will often or some times make a difference for small sales (I've made a couple small and a couple larger).
By the way, if it's in a well known registrar like GoDaddy perhaps it's better to start by asking "do you have a GoDaddy account?" instead of straight explaining everything. Or just ask them for their GD account info and mention they can quickly open one for free if they don't have one. Maybe?
 
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another thought on the 60 day thingy:

waiting, gives you opportunity to know your name
ie:
if it gets traffic or earns some revenue,
also time to see if there will be any incoming offers... which would put you in a better negotiating position

if you sell early without knowing if the name has additional assets, other than the name itself....then that info could help validate asking price or give justification to ask for more.

I've read many a solicitation letter, where sellers mention search volume or ranking potential, in an attempt to allude to the name having existing traffic, but they never include verifiable stats.

just saying....

imo….
 
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If you mean from registration date, it's all registrars as far as I know.. It's ICANN policy I believe (so it's not even up to the registrars to unlock them).
The 60-day lock is not mandatory. The lock is standard for most registrars, but the registrar has the option to unlock the domain. So it comes down to the registrar's lock policy. Some may even do one-offs.
 
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Pedro Santos

DOTONOMIC.COM
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1,389
The 60-day lock is not mandatory. The lock is standard for most registrars, but the registrar has the option to unlock the domain. So it comes down to the registrar's lock policy. Some may even do one-offs.

So they lie to our faces about it being mandatory? Or are you thinking of the 60 days since contact info change lock?
 

rohitgoyal

Top Contributor
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If you start doing outbound on a domain still within the 60 day transfer period and you then tell the end user that they would have to create an account at your registrar in order to have it pushed before then, would this put them off?

Is it better to promote the domain after 60 days?

Generally speaking yes it's better to wait for 60 days before doing outbound for any domain.

However if you book your domains in godaddy than you are on safe side. Due to their massive advertisement every person is aware about godaddy and majority hAve account over there. Even if they don't have than they don't mind creating account in godaddy as it's a well known platform even among general public. Last week I sold 4 domains via outbound and all the end users happily opened account in godaddy.

Lastly a lot depends upon domain name and your selling price. If the end user likes your domain and the selling price than they don't really mind to take extra step to open up an account though you would have to explain the same to them.
 

TauseefKhan

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recently, I tried to promote domains registered at NameSilo on Afternic platform and I receive the following message from them:
"For domains to be eligible for the Premium Promotion level, they need to be registered at the current registrar for at least 60 days. The domains that you selected for Premium Promotion have not been registered at NameSilo for at least 60 days. I have switched them to the Network Promotion level, so that they are actively listed for sale. Once they have been registered for 60 days, you can successfully upgrade them to the Premium Promotion level"
 

myfavorite

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We need to differentiate listing in various market places and out bounding.

While some outbound might have issue as stated above, most market place like Sedo etc maintain account with most of the Registrars. They will likely require you just push the domain to their account with the Registrar and they handle the rest if it's within the 60days lock period.
 

Domains - Wanted

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If you start doing outbound on a domain still within the 60 day transfer period and you then tell the end user that they would have to create an account at your registrar in order to have it pushed before then, would this put them off?
No problem. Most of my buyers are perfectly happy to keep the domain with the current registrar. The domain age has never figured in negotiations. Although, my setting up their new account and delivering the goods on a silver platter, so to speak, may have had something to do with this :xf.smile:
 
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rohitgoyal

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60-day transfer lock could tip the scale in the wrong way with outbound marketing since most of those buys are made on impulse, especially if in low $xxx range. Want to keep those transactions as accommodating and effortless as possible.

If it's under a 60-day lock and you want to move in quick, make it available to buy instantly through the marketplace of the registrar it's hosted with or through a service like Undeveloped or Sedo where at least they've committed to the buy and have already paid before the arrangement of transfer begins.
 
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