Dan.com

domain odour.shop

NameSilo
Status
Not open for further replies.

BeyondTheDot

Established Member
Impact
25
One of my best New gTLD's. It was not accepted in the current Sedo New gTLD auction. Even though it ticked all the boxes for it to qualify in my opinion and it has the desired .shop extension which is another requirement.

I also own the .com version for brand protection which should add more value to the domain.

In American English the prefer domain would probably be; 'odor dot store' right? Well, I also have 'smell dot store' if that is any good. However, in that case I do not own the .com version. I will submit a separate appraisal for that name afterwards, so there is no need to mention anything about that name here.

What do you think? Is Sedo right and am I wrong once again?

What has been accepted in their auction are these names:
tha lasso dot shop
shabby chic dot shop


That must have been an instant no-brainer approval when those came along.
 

cooljub

Top Contributor
Impact
1,320
Hi,
It's not a good name in my opinion. Although 'odour' means scent or smell, it's usually used to describe a bad one.
 

jhm

Top Contributor
Impact
10,320
Hi,
It's not a good name in my opinion. Although 'odour' means scent or smell, it's usually used to describe a bad one.
Yeah, I agree with this. The word "odour" often relates to an unpleasant smell. A word like "scent" or "aroma" would be an improvement, if anything
 

BeyondTheDot

Established Member
Impact
25
I looked up the meaning of this word and found this on Wikipedia:


An odor or odour is caused by one or more volatilized chemical compounds that are generally found in low concentrations that humans and animals can perceive by their sense of smell. An odor is also called a "smell" or a "scent", which can refer to either a pleasant or an unpleasant odor. While "odor" can refer to pleasant and unpleasant odors, the terms "scent", "aroma", and "fragrance" are usually reserved for pleasant-smelling odors and are frequently used in the food and cosmetic industry to describe floral scents or to refer to perfumes. In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth, English-speaking nations, "odour" refers to scents in general—without positive or negative connotations; but in the United States, and for many non-native English speakers around the world, "odor" generally has a negative connotation as a synonym for "stink". An unpleasant odor can also be described as "reeking" or "smelly", and can also be called a "malodor" or "stench".


Therefore, I will hold on to the domain as it could serve one of the other English speaking nations.

Do you agree and what are your thoughts now that you know this?
 
Last edited:

jhm

Top Contributor
Impact
10,320
I looked up the meaning of this word and found this on Wikipedia:


An odor or odour is caused by one or more volatilized chemical compounds that are generally found in low concentrations that humans and animals can perceive by their sense of smell. An odor is also called a "smell" or a "scent", which can refer to either a pleasant or an unpleasant odor. While "odor" can refer to pleasant and unpleasant odors, the terms "scent", "aroma", and "fragrance" are usually reserved for pleasant-smelling odors and are frequently used in the food and cosmetic industry to describe floral scents or to refer to perfumes. In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth, English-speaking nations, "odour" refers to scents in general—without positive or negative connotations; but in the United States, and for many non-native English speakers around the world, "odor" generally has a negative connotation as a synonym for "stink". An unpleasant odor can also be described as "reeking" or "smelly", and can also be called a "malodor" or "stench".


Therefore, I will hold on to the domain as it could serve one of the other English speaking nations.

Do you agree and what are your thoughts now that you know this?
My thoughts remain the same, sadly...regardless of the definition you've found. As it says at the bottom of that definition, it simply has a negative connotation. When you say "I smell an odour" during a conversation, trust me...native English speakers that know the language take that as a bad smell. Keep if you want anyway, best of luck with it
 
Last edited:
I couldnt read what you wrote as the font is to small. Reg fee
What a beautiful odour coming off you tonite donut 👃
 

jhm

Top Contributor
Impact
10,320

BeyondTheDot

Established Member
Impact
25
jhm said:
My thoughts remain the same, sadly...regardless of the definition you've found. As it says at the bottom of that definition, it simply has a negative connotation. When you say "I smell an odour" during a conversation, trust me...native English speakers that know the language take that as a bad smell. Keep if you want anyway, best of luck with it

In that case it is ideal. It means 'bad smell' is a problem. What if the domain is going to be used for cleaning or anti-odor product.

So let's finish the conversation you started to illustrate the purpose of this domain:


Speaker1: "I am so glad you could make it to today's meeting."

Speaker2: "Yes, I had to run fast to get here in time though..."

Speaker3: "Uhmm, I smell an odour."

Speaker1: "Yes, me too!"

Speaker2: "I don't smell anything."

Speaker1: "I always get my odour eliminators from the 'Odour (dot) shop'. They have great offers going all the time, and their products smell amazing. There are so many nice fragrances to choose from. You should really check them out.

Speaker3: Sounds great, I'll check them out tonight.
Speaker1: "I might do too."
 

jhm

Top Contributor
Impact
10,320
jhm said:


In that case it is ideal. It means 'bad smell' is a problem. What if the domain is going to be used for cleaning or anti-odor product.

So let's finish the conversation you started to illustrate the purpose of this domain:
I respect that. Its more a case of the shop providing an odour (selling an odour), than eliminating it, the way it comes across, at face value...I think that's the key point here. You can look at it your way, but ugh..."welcome to the ordour shop". It would grab my attention and give me a giggle if I saw it in the street, put it that way. Also, the word "odor" would be American English...ordour (yours) being British English, limiting yourself to the UK market
 
Last edited:

cooljub

Top Contributor
Impact
1,320

BeyondTheDot

Established Member
Impact
25
Its more a case of the shop providing an odour (selling an odour), than eliminating it, the way it comes across, at face value...I think that's the key point here.
Yes, I understand what you mean. Maybe there will be a market someday that requires bad smells to eliminate even worse odors.

You can look at it your way, but ugh..."welcome to the ordour shop". It would grab my attention and give me a giggle if I saw it in the street, put it that way.
Thanks for giving some hope as well.

Also, the word "odor" would be American English...ordour (yours) being British English, limiting yourself to the UK market
I am not sure why you write 'ordour' instead of 'odour'. Maybe it's a typo.

What about the other English speaking nations; 'Commonwealth, English-speaking nations'
  • Australia
  • New-Zealand
  • Ireland
Well, even if it were only the UK market, it is still a large enough market. It might catch on in the USA too, if it would rank high in the search engines.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.