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New Top Level Domains!

Located in gTLD Discussion started by SDX, Jun 1, 2011.

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  1. jmcc

    jmcc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Well if .BIZ had stuck to its original plan of being a business only TLD, it might done a little bit better but faced with .INFO's buying marketshare, it just couldn't compete.

    I'm seeing indications of this already with the existing gTLDs. What actually happens when a new TLD is launched is that there is an initial spike in registrations, followed by a dump of the highly speculative ones a year later but there's also a concurrent increased interest in the bluechip TLDs (for most countries that means the local ccTLD and the .com and to a lesser extent NET/ORG/INFO). The classic example of this flight to quality was the .EU Fiasco. The .EU ccTLD was gamed to hell and back, many people who failed to get their .eu domain went and registered a ccTLD or a .com, or more ccTLDs or .com domains. This underlined a more serious issue with new TLDs: consumer trust. Each new gTLD will have its fanboys and fangirls but if the consumers are not aware of it, those domain investments will be strictly -regfee (that's minus regfee because registrants aren't getting the regfee back).

    Regards...jmcc
     
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  2. c4smok

    c4smok Established Member

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    I am kinda wondering if people will lose trust in some of these new extensions if some end up going under in a few years.. Will Icann back such registrations? Or will people just get screwed =X
     
  3. jmcc

    jmcc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    There is a redelegation process from what I remember (though at this time of the morning, I'm not 100% sure about how it works). Basically it would allow a TLD to be redelegated (like a domain transfer but on a much larger scale) to a new registry in the event of one going bust or for other reasons. Registries being taken over by other companies has happened before - the .mobi registry was taken over by Afilias in 2010. Redelegation has also happened with ccTLDs though ICANN does not regulate ccTLDs.

    Regards...jmcc
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2011
  4. bmugford

    bmugford www.DataCube.com PRO ICA Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    One thing people also need to realize is, at best, the first new gTLD will not even hit the market until 11/2013.

    That is almost 2 1/2 years even in an ideal world. With legal challenges and other issues the reality could be even longer that that, especially for generic terms.

    What if a company is the high bidder for the extension .RealEstate. They end up auctioning off all the top GEOs for big amounts.

    Down the road this company sells the entire extension to another entity. What if that new entity has a different business model and wants to change the registration policy.

    They might want to reclaim all those Geo.RealEstate for their own personal use.

    There are many potential issues here that need to be addressed by ICANN.

    Brad
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2011
  5. equity78

    equity78 Top Member TLDInvestors.com TheDomains Staff PRO Gold Account VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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  6. Tim Schoon

    Tim Schoon Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I think it's utterly useless!

    So a company could have their own TLD... Then what?
    A subdomain would be needed.. but what would you prefer as a homepage?

    1. cocacola.com
    2. website.cocacola / home.cocacola / com.cocacola?!

    I think it's the stupidest idea they came up with so far.
     
  7. alien51

    alien51 Take Me To Your Leader VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Human beings are too lazy to type things that are trivial to them.

    For example, i don't think people would even type a domain name all the way up to ".cocacola" or even ".fujitsu". It's too long and too trivial. Unlike say people are more willing to type 500 characters worth of the same arguments over and over again on threads such as this.

    And besides, that's exactly the reason why Search Engines were invented in the first place-- i am too lazy to remember your beautiful, catchy, domain name and snazzy extension whatever it is. I'll just type the freakin keyword on Google, and let Google find it for me on a silver platter.

    One thing this new TLD can serve a purpose is when GOOGLE tweaks its algorithm. Such that it will give priority first on these "supposedly" restricted and screened extensions first, because presumably they are more legit than the unrestricted dot coms.
     
  8. gpmgroup

    gpmgroup Established Member ★★★★★★★★★★

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  9. alien51

    alien51 Take Me To Your Leader VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I read the link article just now.

    I think the guy who wrote it is simply making conclusions based on the "status quo" of what the algorithms stand as of today. Unless the SEs have clearly spelled out their stand on the issue.

    It's debatable that "restricted" domains make sense to be prioritized in search results, because they are "sanitized" already. That is what the segregation is supposed to be for. To make it easier for you to zero-in on the legits because they were already body-scanned so to speak when they got their unique domain extensions. Why does a user have to sift through the ocean of dot coms where we know we are gaming the system to rank on top using SEO?
     
  10. the_poet

    the_poet Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    dotCOM is king and isn't going to be affected at all. In fact, it will continue to rise in value and even the dotKeyword.com domains will be worth more (this might be a new trend).
     
  11. Archangel

    Archangel randypendleton.com VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    It's been said a billion times but I think it still holds a lotta weight: The more extensions there are out there will likely be the more desired a .com would be. The .com isn't hurting and these new extensions will not be a competition to it. .com is safe.


     
  12. mwzd

    mwzd Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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  13. daily_earning

    daily_earning Account Closed

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    Find the best domains is not so easy task, but suggestions always makes this better to choose the best one that enhance your business goal.
     
  14. alien51

    alien51 Take Me To Your Leader VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I was wondering about this while reading the morning newspaper in the can today: What kind of domain name would they even put on such an extension as .PEPSI ???? DRINK.PEPSI ????

    One billion people in the planet drink Pepsi, why on earth would they look up Pepsi on the internet? Let alone search for .PEPSI domains.

    This is a huge unnecassary corporate expense just to protect a brand with nothing useful in it.

    I have a feeling it is just these ICANN-Get-Rich-Quick bimbos who are pushing companies to reserve their domain brands on these new TLDs.

    PEPSI is a brand that is so unique, i don't think any person in his right mind would even pick up the .PEPSI extension if he is not connected with Pepsi. There is a screening process for applicants, and if you get rejected, ICANN keeps your $186,000 application fee. Why would you risk that kind of money if you have no legitimate claim for such brand?

    I'm not sure PEPSI would even grab the .PEPSI extension. Evenif they would, i would still think it's a terrible waste of money. They could just save that $186,000 for attorney fees to sue anyone who would register that extension.

    Same goes for .FUJITSU or .MOTOROLA

    I think it's pretty much useless to protect these brands on those extensions. They can probably snap it up after 10 more years, and just see for now how these new TLDs will pan out. They could save huge dollars down the road if ever these anything-goes-domain-extension fad will prove to be a dud.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  15. Kate

    Kate Domainosaurus Rex VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Exactly, there is so much talk about these so-called new TLDs but in the case of private (corporate) TLDs, what do you put at the left of the dot.
    drink.pepsi zero.pepsi diet.pepsi what else ?
    Running a full TLD for a few dozens domains max, that will be defensive regs. Doesn't make sense to me. Prestige expense perhaps, useful: hardly.
     
  16. Meongtae

    Meongtae Established Member

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    Too much clutter. They are turning the net into a swamp.
     
  17. jmcc

    jmcc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Yep but that assumes that people will register domains and develop websites in these new gTLDs. The problem for the non-core TLDs is that development is not as high as in .com and the ccTLDs. Most people may go years without ever seeing a site in the new gTLDs when they go live.

    Regards...jmcc
     
  18. bmugford

    bmugford www.DataCube.com PRO ICA Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I think that the .GEO gTLD have the most potential for usage, but there are some major issues.

    1.) There are a finite supply of good terms.

    There will be demand for RealEstate.NYC, Dentist.NYC, Attorney.NYC, etc.

    How will these top terms be assigned, or will they be reserved by the city?

    I don't see someone really going with that extension for a company name over a more credible extension.

    Basically unless an end user could get a top tier term, why would they want to go with this type of extension? The top tier terms will not come cheap.

    2.) If these local geo gTLD don’t have some type of nexus requirements, and the top terms end up in the hands of domainers, these extensions will be DOA.

    In general with these new gTLD, if domainers get the top keywords, usage of the extension will be dead, and the extension itself will be dead.

    Brad
     
  19. Archangel

    Archangel randypendleton.com VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    They'd be defensive regs for a problem that they've created on their own. Seriously, if I (an individual with no Pepsi connections) tried to get .pepsi, what are my odds of getting it?

     
  20. Kate

    Kate Domainosaurus Rex VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Brad, that's exactly why new extensions fail :tu:
    There is little upside to bid high for premium keywords that are of questionable value anyway.
    If you're going to pay for a domain, you'll typically have higher expectations and go for a viable extension.

    IMO domainers don't drive end users out of the domain landrushes, the end users are just not there because they're not interested, or hardly aware which is pretty much the same.
    It's a symptom of the huge failure of new extensions, that Icann don't want to see. Domainers are like squatters plundering the house that has never been inhabited :tri:
     
  21. DU

    DU Secret Santa VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    MOST new gTLDs won't have any interest in domainers or selling domains.
    Domainers have ZERO value add in this system.
    PERIOD.

    Those that try this method will take VC capital and initial monies and run.. .XXX, for example :)

    Some new organizations will open new playgrounds, lock the gate, and keep the crud out.

    Some existing organizations are taking their ball and going home.

    Some domainers can keep playing in the existing inner cities waiting for someone to come and gentrify the area. Some will continue to eek out a living in the suburbs. And the greedy will be out in the deserts with their big Billboards collecting tumbleweed.

    Welcome.
     
  22. jmcc

    jmcc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Based on the way that recent launches have gone, they'll be reserved and auctioned off to the highest bidder.

    Surprisingly, this company name rather than category killer is exactly what I see every day with ccTLD websites. There's a curious aspect to the way that people remember ccTLD websites. Since they identify with the ccTLD, (it is their country), they don't really have to remember the extension in the same way that they'd have to remember .com or .net etc. This makes the brand/company name far more important.

    If they are selling locally, as in the case of a New York merchant and .nyc, then it makes a lot more sense to set up shop on the .nyc site.

    Yes and no. Yes, the terms will end up in the hands of domainers but most users will never see these sites because they will go straight on to PPC. No because it might exclude businesses wanting to sell into that local geo market. However if they adopt the .eu model, any new gTLD will definitely be DOA. What happened with .eu was that the regulatory framework was drafted by people who didn't understand the domain business and the operation of the ccTLD was given to a third rate ccTLD registry with no expertise in running a gTLD. The result was massive and industrial scale cyberwarehousing and cybersquatting. European businesses did not get their business names and it killed development in .eu ccTLD stone dead. It still has not recovered and there has not been a single major pureplay operation using .eu as its primary brand since the ccTLD launched. That's the prospect that faces these new gTLDs.

    In an early market, the top keywords make for great headlines and fanboyism. The reality is that each new gTLD has a battle to get web development started in their gTLD. That's what makes a TLD a success or failure. The smartest thing that these new gTLD operators could do would be to make development withing a year compulsory.

    Regards...jmcc

    ---------- Post added at 10:27 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:20 PM ----------

    It is funny to see some domainers in new TLDs tallking about secondary markets when the primary market hasn't even been established yet. The new gTLDs will rely on brand protection registrations/fear/and domainers. They've all got to get a critical mass of domains in the first year or the landrush anniversary junk dumps will wipe them out. The domainers will add value to the registry's balance sheet but not much more. :)

    Regards...jmcc
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  23. DU

    DU Secret Santa VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    The point I am making is that most of these TLDs won't create a secondary market at all. They might create a very well managed PRIMARY market and that's it.
     
  24. jmcc

    jmcc Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    True. But even that reality is not going to stop fanboys fooling themselves that there aquisitions are worth millions.:)

    Regards...jmcc
     
  25. DU

    DU Secret Santa VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    My point is that fan boys won't get them.
     

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