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news Former France.com domain owner asks Supreme Court to consider case

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NickB

it's a mystery
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NickB

it's a mystery
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14,282
Timing is probably quite bad with AUSUK, France are not happy with America, so don't think they will care too much about what US supreme court says.

But can a US court order ICANN to transfer the domain back over if previous owner wins the appeal?
That's a good question - ICANN are a U.S group after all.
 
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NickB

it's a mystery
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Jean-Noel Frydman

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My french isn't as good as it used to be but the last time I checked the French called their country "La France".

Actually, the official name of the country is La République Française (The French Republic), not France.

And, apart from that, there is NOTHING in French law (except the Appeals court decision regarding France.com) that gives the country any right over the name France. Nothing.
 

Jean-Noel Frydman

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Great, France changes their rules for how the world works in 2019 and everybody has to just follow their bandwagon. (I truly believe they would lose this case in a European Court). Is this how this works? I am assuming that this is the reason they went after france.com.

Exactly right. There's nothing in French law to protect the word France. Not one article of law, and no prior jurisprudence (except for the Appeals court decision in the France.com case) There are also more than 200000 trademarks in France (5 last week alone) with the name France, which proves it is not protected under French law.
 

BrandEntrance.com

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The Dot Com was registered by the US Department of Defense . It was created to do some kind of world commercial trading to connect people and businesses. Basically commerical purposes.

It wasn't created by France. So I think what they did was basically stole the domain, like stealing candy from a baby. Using immunity on a domain name makes no sense. When they could easily solve it by "buying it out". Unless its really complicated, sensitive, and there are almost no choices immunity makes sense. A big country stealing from a US citizen ....

International internet theft is what it is. They have choices, and still to this day they can redress their wrong. And can chose to settle the case peacefully. They have a lot of options still to this day!
In Sweden, all these country domains were reserved and offered to the countries that had claim to them Some countries didn't take up the offer and these .se domains, which were held in reserve for 15 years, were recently released for anybody to register. Thailand.se is one example.
 
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Impact
151
The Dot Com was registered by the US Department of Defense . It was created to do some kind of world commercial trading to connect people and businesses. Basically commerical purposes.

It wasn't created by France. So I think what they did was basically stole the domain, like stealing candy from a baby. Using immunity on a domain name makes no sense. When they could easily solve it by "buying it out". Unless its really complicated, sensitive, and there are almost no choices immunity makes sense. A big country stealing from a US citizen ....

International internet theft is what it is. They have choices, and still to this day they can redress their wrong. And can chose to settle the case peacefully. They have a lot of options still to this day!
 
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