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Would using BuyDomains/HugeDomains/Uniregistry BIN prices for COMPS be a Good Idea?

Labeled as question in General Domain Discussion started by Avtar629, Jan 3, 2017.

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  1. Avtar629

    Avtar629 MarketDN.com Gold Account VIP

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    Hello,
    Every now and them we all come across domains that are taken during our search for handregs or aftermarket. Usually Domainers tend to find a niche and "go with it". Most of the taken domains we find them having blatantly visible BIN prices shown on their landing pages. Some are similar to the domains we already have in our inventory.

    I was wondering if it's wise to reference such domains in your outbound sales for Comps?

    say if someone had ABCworld.com for $10K for example and you had WorldABC.com is it wise to use that landing page with the BIN price to use as a negotiating tool? or would you risk losing the sale to that other domain?

    anyone ever experience doing this and perhaps having it backfire?

    I always find myself in a pickle when trying to price my domains. So I usually just assume "someone" else knows what they are doing aka BuyDomains or HugeDomains or Uniregistry when it comes to pricing and price mine accordingly thereby eliminating the need for high priced appraisals from the likes of Estibot and Sedo.

    and of course there is also Namebio but that only shows historical sold prices.

    Would like to hear your opinion NP. Thanks.
     
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  2. JONAH LEUNG

    JONAH LEUNG Established Member

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    This should be related to people's language use environment, there are times when there was little difference between before and after the change, but sometimes before and after exchange differs a lot.
     
  3. Avtar629

    Avtar629 MarketDN.com Gold Account VIP

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    I don't understand what you mean

    But thanks?
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
  4. Michael

    Michael NameBio.com NameBio Staff PRO ICA Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    If it was an inbound inquiry you can assume they're looking at alternatives and are probably already aware of what you found, if it was outbound (you contacting them) I definitely wouldn't mention it.

    I don't really see an upside in mentioning it in either case though. Worst case scenario you turn them on to a domain they didn't think of, and you make a sale for someone else without getting a commission. Best case scenario they ignore it, because an asking price doesn't really mean anything.

    You could register/buy a similar domain to one you own, throw up a BIN lander for $10 million, and then show them how cheap "your" alternative is :) They aren't going to suddenly jump at your price because of this new information. Anyone can ask anything, that doesn't mean it is reasonable/sane or will ever sell anywhere near that price in our lifetimes. Historical sales are more powerful as "social proof" because someone actually threw down their cash.

    You could use the asking prices of alternatives to help you determine pricing. If an equal or better alternative is available at BuyDomains for $2,500 you probably shouldn't be asking $10k if you want to make a sale any time soon. But you also have to consider that BuyDomains and HugeDomains price for high velocity and good cash flows, not maximizing the sale price, so pricing similar to them might not work for someone who doesn't own hundreds of thousands of domains. Uni on the other hand maximizes sale prices, which also might not work for your business if you need better cash flow. And not every domain on a Uni BIN lander is owned by Frank, so you'd have to check the WHOIS to gauge the strategy that resulted in that asking price.

    So at the end of the day you should price based on what works for your business model, use those companies as rough guidance but not a bible, and not mention other domains for sale to the prospective buyer as proof that your asking price is reasonable (IMO).

    On a related note, when I get an inbound inquiry I'll sometimes reach out to the owners of similar domains that are likely to be on the buyer's hit list if they aren't publicly for sale, to get an idea of what my "competition" is priced at or if they're even willing to sell (if not they're obviously not an alternative).
     
  5. garptrader

    garptrader Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Your top tier domains should be priced higher because they will be difficult to replace if they sell. I recently received a $500 offer for a one-word .com. I picked it up many years ago but will likely never replace that domain as one-word domains are. Not easy to find.
     

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