Dominion.Domains

The NEW 21st Century Paradigm for Domaining

Discussion in 'General Domain Discussion' started by stub, May 12, 2018.

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  1. stub

    stub Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    This is exactly what we are doing with every domain registration or purchase as domainers. I think the proponents here would say you need to "manage" your selection of the 2nd word, wisely. In order to maximize your chances of a sale.
     
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  2. garptrader

    garptrader Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    What I have seen with some of my two-word .Com domains registered years ago is that yes eventually someone launches on the .net or some Cctld or a hyphenated version or they add a third word or a number - anything to avoid the aftermarket -even though relatively speaking the cost of the domain would be trivial compared to other costs of doing business.
     
  3. NameSplice

    NameSplice Established Member

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    TireRack great brand
    TireWorld great brand
    TireCarnival it's ok I guess. ShoeCarnival made something out of it.

    TireWorld .com on Afternic with min offer of set at $48,750.
    TireCarnival .com reg fee.

    If you were the end user what would you do? Would you pay the amount for TireWorld or look for an alternative brand such as TireCarnival and secure the domain at reg fee?

    I think there are just too many alternatives
    to pick. TireCarnival might not be the best but could maybe save $50,000 + on a domain name purchase.
    The person selling TireWorld may be waiting a while and sell if they're lucky.

    I'm asking this because I've invested in two word brandables and like to create the names but might not be the best strategy for investing.
     
  4. stub

    stub Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    For me personally. I think Carnival is too long and I'd look for a shorter suffix. I don't really like how the 2 words go together. But it's a brand. If somebody says it is a brand. But I'd consider it quite risky as a registration. As for the best for a domainer to invest in with the word "tire" . I'd keep looking. An alliteration might be a better choice. TireTracks.com kept popping into my head, but it's taken. You need to think at least a little bit outside of the box. But not too far, like Carnival.
     
  5. BrandableDomain

    BrandableDomain Established Member

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    This starts back at the earlier question from @stub about whether we should:

    “…be going off and registering domains like BabyWorld.com, when there could be a hundred words to replace the "world" part of the domain name. Is that what you are saying?”

    There are a hundred suffixes like “world” but they rank in order of importance (slightly differently for different keywords). OK, lets switch from babies to tires!

    Everyone’s view of the rank will vary but imagine this list contains 100 names. Please don’t pay too much attention to this quick list of names off the top of my head, this is only an exercise:

    1. TireWorld
    2. TireCo
    3. TireShop
    4. TireStore
    5. TireCorp
    6. TireWarehouse
    7. TireRack
    8. TireCenter (and Centre)
    9. TirePlanet
    10. TireTown (nice)

    (Insert another 85 domains here).

    95. Tires247 (plural not so good)
    96. Tires360
    97. TireVendors
    98. TireBucket
    99. TireBarrel
    100. TireGorilla

    101. TireCarnival (Sorry, didn’t make the Top 100!)

    So following is a suggested response to the above question and this similar one from @NameSplice as follows:

    “If you were the end user what would you do? Would you pay the amount for TireWorld or look for an alternative brand such as TireCarnival and secure the domain at reg fee?”

    “I'm asking this because I've invested in two word brandables and like to create the names but might not be the best strategy for investing.”


    IMHO it’s a safe investment if you can obtain names at the top of the rank (in a large industry) but more and more risky the closer you get to the bottom end.

    If you are able to get any from the top like TireWorld or TireCo or TireTown you have a chance of a good sale some time. (Though see note about tire industry at end.)

    But if you invest in TireCarnival it’s just a lottery ticket and inadvisable. The higher up the list, the safer your investment. Agree with stub, the carnival name is far too risky.

    The person holding TireWorld at $48,750 is holding out for a max price, but knows they can cut the price any time, the very top rank names are blue chip.

    If NameSplice is investing in mostly two word (keyword plus brandable) combos, it would be wise to try to diversify out a bit. And all of us have to study the sales charts. I spent at least an hour today taking a second close look at that recent Uniregistry sales chart published by DNjournal recently. You have to keep up with what actually is selling. (I don't remember seeing any tire sales for example.)

    To note, some people have built up a list of up to say 100 suffixes like in the example, and a much smaller one for prefixes too. For the example, I didn’t look at mine, and it’s secret so please don’t ask!

    Second note, I do happen to own one or two “tire” domains, but it doesn’t seem like anyone starts up a new tire company very often at all, so pick your industry very carefully. I recently got a name containing the keyword “industry” which I feel is much wider in scope and hence a much better investment.

    If the above list was "crypto", you should have bought all 100 :whistle:
     
  6. BrandableDomain

    BrandableDomain Established Member

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    The theme of “tire” is actually a good case study for this style of keyword + extension brandable name.

    I can remember Michael Cyger of DNacademy recommending that before investing you should think about who would actually buy it, great advice. I often make the mistake of not following this principle.

    There are some negatives against this type of tire domain investment:

    1. I check sales a lot and don’t remember ever seeing any tire domains sold at least lately, but too lazy to do a proper check. Before buying a narrow name like this, you should have a good look on DNjournal and NameBio and try to see if any domains have sold in the last year or so.

    2. Where I live, I don’t remember ever seeing a new tire shop open up. Nothing ever changes, just the same old national franchise tire stores just keep on going. Not a growing or changing industry. So nobody much needs a new domain.

    3. “Tire” is spelled “tyre” in several countries.

    4. You don’t buy tires online - who fits their own tires? Another negative.

    So all in all, I don’t think a tire domain is likely to be a good investment, better to look for much more generic domains. But you have to make your own judgement.
     
  7. NameSplice

    NameSplice Established Member

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    I hear what you are saying.
    I just used tire as an example because tireworld was listed for sale at a big cost and tirecarnival at reg fee.
    I don't have any "tire" domains at all.

    TireRack .com is a site and I did purchase tires from there. Got my brother in law to put them on.:xf.grin: I'm sure the smaller tire/service stations do order there inventory from online distributors imo.

    ShoeCarnival made something out of the name so it was just an example using Carnival as a company did brand with this. I do agree it would not be the best suffix to use.

    I just try thinking of some of the brands that are established.
    FamilyDollar
    DollarGeneral
    BurgerKing
    SamsClub

    I do agree the closer you get to the bottom to more risky it is to invest in and you are just hoping one day a company will want to call themselves that name.

    Thank you for your valuable feedback.:xf.smile:
     
  8. DomainRecap

    DomainRecap Established Member

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    The worst part about this is that it essentially cannibalizes your ability to sell the .COM to someone else in even a nearby industry. Brand TMs rule within business areas, no matter the extension, and the back-dating only works for the original registrant. Plus, no one wants to be second.

    And all this "you'll lose traffic to the .COM' is so old school it makes me laugh every time I hear it, and assuming you are not a billion-dollar multinational (in which case you would have already bought the .COM right?), this is hardly a concern for a small to medium-sized business in 2018.
     
  9. stub

    stub Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    So should we drop all our .net & .org names. Or just dump them cheaply?
     
  10. bluemeteor

    bluemeteor Established Member

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    But we still hoping someone from another country would buy it. Or that small business is too small to be noticed, so it wouldn't affect the next nearby industry buyer.
     
  11. DomainRecap

    DomainRecap Established Member

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    Exactly, and that happens a lot with multiple smaller businesses operating on different extensions, but I've also seen a medium-to-large (and visible) business start operating off the .CO (or .NET/.ORG) and essentially kill the resale value for the .COM (other than hoping that same biz buys it later).
     
  12. hwgriffi

    hwgriffi Established Member ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Could you imagine being one of the worlds largest online resource for any one of these items.

    How cornered they would be.

    Come on bro.
     
  13. bluemeteor

    bluemeteor Established Member

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    Big corp excludes big corp > big corp excludes small biz > small biz excludes big corp > small biz excludes small biz
     

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