Dan.com

GoDaddy's Premium DNS

Dynadot
Impact
11,144
It's only $2.99/month for all domains in your account. Is this a steal or just another trick to get your money. On average. I have between 10-30 domains in my account at any one time. I use GoDaddy's regular DNS to forward the domains to my forsale website.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
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7,350
Read the fine print. If they can actually deliver what they promise at 2.99/month it isn't that unreasonable.

If they can't deliver, there's probably a SLA in place, hold them to that.

not really but this is a joke godaddy.com/hosting/premium-dns
'Close security gaps ' does this mean godaddy regular DNS has security Gaps ?

Yes, most regular DNS services have these security gaps.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
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@branding care to explain more ? Thanks!

I haven't gone through their offering thoroughly but at first glance, they offer dnssec on premium DNS. It has pros and cons but it does add another level of protection.

There are better sources but for those interested:
https://www.godaddy.com/help/what-is-dnssec-6135

Edit:

As for the SLA, they promisd a 99.999% uptime. There's a reason five nines dot com sold for good money ;)
 
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Future Sensors

78% of human domainers will be replaced by robots
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10,991
Impact
11,144
To answer @Name Trader , not a trick but I wouldn't sign up for just a small amount of domains unless they're developed and/or mission critical.

Why not. What do you call a small amount of domains? As I think I've said, I have a revolving 10-30 domains.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
Impact
7,350
Why not. What do you call a small amount of domains? As I think I've said, I have a revolving 10-30 domains.

Anything below a hundred maybe. As for the why, think of it like you have 2 cars. Both of them will get you from A to B. One may be just a bit more comfortable and reliable than the other but both get their primary job done.

Offering services like discussed is GD's businessmodel. Add-ons you don't really need but may give you peace of mind.

Tbh, it's never a good idea to use your registrar's DNS in the first place. You should register with X use DNS from Y and host with Z.
 
Impact
4,476
Pros:
1) GoDaddy Premium DNS is anycast. Afaik, regular DNS service is not.

ref:
Anycast is a network addressing and routing methodology in which a single destination IP address is shared by devices (generally servers) in multiple locations. Routers direct packets addressed to this destination to the location nearest the sender, using their normal decision-making algorithms, typically the lowest number of BGP network hops. Anycast routing is widely used by content delivery networks such as web and DNS hosts, to bring their content closer to end users.
(source: Wikipedia)

2) GoDaddy Premium DNS supports "secondary" mode. In other words, it may be possible to use 3rd party dns servers together with GoDaddy ones --> extra stability

Cons:

With GoDaddy, secondary DNS setup is not always compatible with common standards (GoDaddy does not actually respect these standards). Resultingly, in some cases you may actually be unable to configure what GoDaddy asks for to set such a scheme.

ref:
Primary DNS is the server (or service) where you configure and manage DNS records. Secondary DNS servers do copy the data from primaries.
 
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Impact
4,476
What GoDaddy does wrong:

https://www.godaddy.com/help/enable...dy-nameservers-as-secondary-nameservers-23911

GoDaddy says: "You must enable your master nameserver set to allow AXFR requests from IP ranges 50.63.22.0-50.63.22.255 and 208.109.132.0-208.109.132.255".

Most external dns providers do allow to enter just a few ip addresses in "axfr allow" setup, not 512 addresses... and there is no way to enter netblocks!

Ref: rfc2182 /"Selection and Operation of Secondary DNS Servers"/. It is teaching us: Secondary Server is an "authoritative server that obtains information about a zone from a Primary Server via a zone transfer mechanism. Sometimes known as a Slave Server." There is nothing showing that slave server(s) can operate from 512 different IPs, which thing GoDaddy is asking for.

Moreover, GoDaddy says: "For best performance, set your master to send NOTIFY messages to 97.74.112.1 and/or 97.74.112.2".

Ref: rfc1996 /"A Mechanism for Prompt Notification of Zone Changes (DNS NOTIFY)/. It is teaching us: "The DNS NOTIFY transaction allows master servers to inform slave servers when the zone has changed". Nowhere it says that master dns should notify servers that are NOT listed as secondary ones, which is exactly what GoDaddy is asking to configure.

I have experienced all this in real life. My second DNS provider was of not help:

"I am sorry, I have tried to find any Godaddy information on what to do if only IP addresses can be entered as slave nameservers and have had no luck.. additionally i cannot find any information on them requiring Notify's to be sent to different IP addresses then what have been set as the slave nameservers. I do suggest you contact Godaddy support as the domain holder for their clarifications on this."

Similarly, GoDaddy support could not help. So, I am no more using GoDaddy premium DNS in this mode (which they implemented ~ Dec., 2020)

For the reasons of fairness, I should add that GoDaddy premium DNS, if used alone (without extra 3rd party DNS involved) is stable and working OK. No issues at all. No dowtimes /like with Dynadot :(( /. Moreover, you can add other DNS servers/services if GoDaddy is used as primary - in this case, there would be no setup/compatibility issues. The last but not the least, GoDaddy Premium DNS also works for domains which are not registered with GoDaddy.
 
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Impact
4,476
Do they support using custom hostnames? Ns1.mydomain.com etc.
Afaik, no. It may (or may not) be possible to configure these unofficially. For example, if you were given lets say

pdns01.domaincontrol.com
pdns02.domaincontrol.com

as "official" DNS for a domain, it may be possible to replace these with ns1.yourdomain.com / ns2.yourdomain.com if you:

- determine the relevant IPs ( In this case, pdns01.domaincontrol.com has address 97.74.110.50, pdns02.domaincontrol.com has address 173.201.78.50 )

- "register" ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com as DNS servers with these IPs in yourdomain.com domain management area

- equally, set A records in yourdomain.com DNS zone

- assign ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com as DNS servers for either yourdomain.com or another domain you have under Premium DNS (but want to show custom nsZZ.youdomain.com hostnames).

Side effect: Should GD change IPs someday, the whole system will stop working. So, it is NOT recommended for production.

For the sake of clarity:
It is generic setup. GoDaddy may have measures in place to prevent such a setup. I did not try it with GD.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
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7,350
Afaik, no. It may (or may not) be possible to configure these unofficially. For example, if you were given lets say

pdns01.domaincontrol.com
pdns02.domaincontrol.com

as "official" DNS for a domain, it may be possible to replace these with ns1.yourdomain.com / ns2.yourdomain.com if you:

- determine the relevant IPs ( In this case, pdns01.domaincontrol.com has address 97.74.110.50, pdns02.domaincontrol.com has address 173.201.78.50 )

- "register" ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com as DNS servers with these IPs in yourdomain.com domain management area

- equally, set A records in yourdomain.com DNS zone

- assign ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com as DNS servers for either yourdomain.com or another domain you have under Premium DNS (but want to show custom nsZZ.youdomain.com hostnames).

Side effect: Should GD change IPs someday, the whole system will stop working. So, it is NOT recommended for production.

For the sake of clarity:
It is generic setup. GoDaddy may have measures in place to prevent such a setup. I did not try it with GD.


Yes, should work. I have a small setup where I do the same with Dan's dns and just monitor for possible IP changes. It does break the auto ownership verification though. Since it's anycast and probably owned ips they shouldn't change that much. But yes, its a workaround.

100% agree. As well as: dnsmadeeasy.com and amazon dns ( https://aws.amazon.com/route53/ . Amazon is for advanced usage though).

Definitely. For the average user I think these options are sufficient and very reliable. Set and forget. R53 comes with a slight learning curve but it's a good option for those looking to educate themselves a bit more about how DNS works. All quite affordable as well imo.
 
Impact
34
Stop spamming your service. Its shit from a technical pov, ignoring all best practices and overly expensive. Thanks.
Sorry to bother you, all my clients only use one server for dns and web, they have hundreds or thousands of domain names, the server runs very well, and the server type is 1CPU 1G Memory, this is a feasible solution proved by practice , I am serious about technology, thanks for your reply.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
Impact
7,350
Sorry to bother you, all my clients only use one server for dns and web, they have hundreds or thousands of domain names, the server runs very well, and the server type is 1CPU 1G Memory, this is a feasible solution proved by practice , I am serious about technology, thanks for your reply.

You cannot be serious at all when you stuff both your DNS and webserver on the same server. That's just very uncommon and bad practice. It's a hot mess asking for issues.

Fine for a sandbox, not so much when it's a live setup.

Taken aside it's absolutely the worst setup you could have, some registrars require you to use (at least) 2 nameservers, using 2 different ips. They'll simply reject your dns if you use 2 on the same IP. As they should cos we don't want to break down the internet. So also from a practical point of view it's an unworkable and undesirable situation.

Now, you could circumvent this by using 2(or more) ips on the same server but ips don't come cheap and your setup is still doomed to fail. Better to spin up another droplet at $10/month instead of nulling your website and losing sales.

Those specs mean next to nothing btw... I can cram that stuff into, say 128Mb. It's all about traffic and load.

Edit:

Btw, disagree all you want. I'm not voicing my opinion just educating about industry standards.
 
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Impact
34
You cannot be serious at all when you stuff both your DNS and webserver on the same server. That's just very uncommon and bad practice. It's a hot mess asking for issues.

Fine for a sandbox, not so much when it's a live setup.

Taken aside it's absolutely the worst setup you could have, some registrars require you to use (at least) 2 nameservers, using 2 different ips. They'll simply reject your dns if you use 2 on the same IP. As they should cos we don't want to break down the internet. So also from a practical point of view it's an unworkable and undesirable situation.

Now, you could circumvent this by using 2(or more) ips on the same server but ips don't come cheap and your setup is still doomed to fail. Better to spin up another droplet at $10/month instead of nulling your website and losing sales.

Those specs mean next to nothing btw... I can cram that stuff into, say 128Mb. It's all about traffic and load.

Edit:

Btw, disagree all you want. I'm not voicing my opinion just educating about industry standards.

Thanks for your reply, I understand what you are saying.

It is only just for domainer to do their forsale lander server, and providing DNS service for their own domains, in general, one server is OK.

Of course, for high-demand domainers, they can use 2 or more servers for DNS, and use a separate server for web service.

PS: I agree with you throughout, the more servers the better.
 

branding

Who's afraid of red, white and blue?
Impact
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It is only just for domainer to do their forsale lander server, and providing DNS service for their own domains, in general, one server is OK.

No. One server is never, ever ok. It matters even more for domainers.

Yes, the more the better. But one is just fooling around looking for issues. It's not even expensive so why risk losing sales? Can't cut corners on this one.
 
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