NameSilo

Pricing is tough

Labeled as discuss in General Domain Discussion, started by abstractdomainer, Sep 12, 2020

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  1. abstractdomainer

    abstractdomainer Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Pricing to me is a really important job. Even after having read tons of articles on pricing, I believe that it is extremely difficult to price a domain name.
    Uncovering the dilemma between value and price:

    Valuing a domain name is possible. You can look at the prospects, the search volume, quality of your name and then, value a name to say $20,000 (knowing that this could be a prospective great upgrade for the right buyer).

    When it comes to pricing it actually in the market, I don't usually price my domains to what the value of the domain really is. If my year is going good, I may price the same domain to $30,000 knowing that I am in no hurry to make the sale happen, since my costs and expenses are taken care of, by the other sales that happened.
    But if my year hasn't gone well in domaining, I would rather price it for $10,000 or even $5,000. The reason being that the domain sale becomes all the more important than the actual price of that sale, at that point.

    And hence, I believe that while the value of a domain may be judged, the pricing is a very personal thing and should be changed/altered time and again, and is a factor of your desperation or optimism to make that sale.

    Therefore, when asking/taking or doing an appraisal yourself, you should know the value of your domain name. But more than that, it is important to realize what you'd price the name, given your pocket, and the liquidity you require.

    Do you agree/disagree?
    Do share your thoughts on how you value and price your domains.
     
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  2. lock

    lock DomainUsed.com VIP

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    I price my names on previous keyword sales and whether or not it is on par or greater than previous sales keyword history. Best result would be to raise a keyword price. Even with brands keyword of industry is relevant for targeting. Date of sale may also influence current market. If holding 100 names in same niche this also might strengthen price. If you don't feel the dollar signs and know your buyer type when hand registering then just don't. Asking price is not settlement. http://www.dnsale.es
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020 at 10:14 AM
  3. koolishman

    koolishman Upgraded Member Blue Account

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    Domaining is subjective. With some conditions.
     
  4. abstractdomainer

    abstractdomainer Upgraded Member Gold Account

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    Thanks will check it out.

    I think it is important to make the distinction.
     
  5. FolioTeam

    FolioTeam AMDB.tv VIP

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    I check a couple of things when pricing a name

    I check previous sales of the keywords if it is a 2-worder. I compare how strong those keywords are when compared to mine. Then, I price accordingly.

    I check how recent the sale was (usually in the last 5 years). The more recent a sale, the better. Reason is that some keywords lose value with time as technology evolves. So, a name that was hot 10 years ago and sold for xx,xxx might not be worth much today and might only go for low xxxx.

    I also check the venue where the sales happened. So, when I see Namejet, Drop catch and GoDaddy, I pretty much assume those are domainer prices. I am only looking at end user prices which is why I get excited when I see high sales from Sedo or BuyDomains etc.

    I also check if people are actively using those keywords on google. Using dotdb to check other registered extensions is all good. But, I have seen instances where most of those other extensions were not resolving or were all pointing to one end user's website.

    Then, there are some names you just shoot for the moon.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020 at 11:06 AM
  6. Jimmysun

    Jimmysun Established Member

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    I think it's more like depend on your target buyer's capability that willing to spend(If you had done the research before buying them).
    I don't pricing my domain very tactically but I can imagine that must be a hard task that you need to routinely do it as a daily job, like bulk research, in my case a question should be how can I pricing my matrixcity.xyz more than 1k(or much lower) if matrix.xyz now selling for 4.5k? I believe even I were not a domain investor I would possibly type in it in search bar for a little test.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020 at 2:38 AM
  7. garptrader

    garptrader Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Historically I have had far more low $xxx sales with a decent number of high $xxx sales while sales over $1000 were unusual. The last couple years I have seen few low $xxx sales while since the pandemic I have more $xxxx sales than $xxx sales.
     
  8. Rick Ace

    Rick Ace Top Contributor VIP

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    I think that one of the key points that has been understated in this topic is target audience. You need to do research not just on your domain but also your target audience. Simply put, a domain is worth what people are willing to pay for it. If you can get the hang of that, then pricing becomes an easy task to do. :)
     

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