Get your catchy domain at it.com

discuss Your domain is worth quite a lot but not when it is in your hands...

NameSilo

tiletalk

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Many of you may have noticed the domains that are very similar or worse than the ones that all of us own go for higher price in godaddy auctions, dropcatch, etc.

If we tried to sell the same names it wouldn't go for that much yet when sold by a company then it fetches much higher price!

the market is crazy ;)
 

jhm

Top Contributor
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One part of that is getting the right exposure, another being the unpredictability...

People often think: "If I've got this, which is similar to that, which got $10k...I SHOULD get at least 20%, 30%, 40% of that number etc". Yeah, doesn't work that way

The attention that a certain domain may get, on the right day, at the right time...many factors come into play, when talking about a domain that may have fetched a miracle price, breaking expectations, but under most circumstances, in most other cases, it wouldn't come close
 
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You are totally correct, @tiletalk. I have reflected on this for a long time. A mediocre name that an end-user needs and that’s on Mike Mann’s hands is always more valuable than on my hands. I have sold names for $4K or $5K that in his hands could have sold for six figures. The difference is that $5K make a big difference in my domain business. For him, $5K is nothing. He can afford to wait much longer and for the right buyer.
 

tiletalk

Established Member
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556
"...go for higher price in godaddy auctions, dropcatch, etc."

That's the key term right there.

Anything that others want has more value to people's eyes.

Make it so it appears that the names you sell are sought by others and you'll sell more names and at a higher price, imo.
so how do we do that?
 

Hypersot

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so how do we do that?

I have absolutely no clue. I only sell passively.

My reaction was based on personal experience seeing names that I drop suddenly getting value out of the blue in backorders, auctions, etc. Not crazy value but for sure more than the $xx that were for sale when I had them.

As someone else said earlier, exposure is the key.
 
Impact
348
You are totally correct, @tiletalk. I have reflected on this for a long time. A mediocre name that an end-user needs and that’s on Mike Mann’s hands is always more valuable than on my hands. I have sold names for $4K or $5K that in his hands could have sold for six figures. The difference is that $5K make a big difference in my domain business. For him, $5K is nothing. He can afford to wait much longer and for the right buyer.

So what is Mike doing right that you can't mimic? That seems like a large gap.
 
So what is Mike doing right that you can't mimic? That seems like a large gap.

He has a portfolio of a few 100K domains (probably about 500K), started early and is a millionaire. He can afford to wait and probability works in his favor.

He seems to have done many things right, and that’s great. Good for him. Again, I am just trying to explain why tiletalk, who started the thread, is correct about this issue.

This is not to say that those of us who are not in Mann’ situation can’t be successful. We can and I consider myself successful in domaining, but the point remains: A name on my hands is generally not as valuable as one on the hands of certain maga-dimainers.
 
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tiletalk

Established Member
Impact
556
He has a portfolio of a few 100K domains (probably about 500K), started early and is a millionaire. He can afford to wait and probability works in his favor.

He seems to have done many things right, and that’s great. Good for him. Again, I am just trying to explain why tiletalk, who started the thread, is correct about this issue.

This is not to say that those of us who are not in Mann’ situation can’t be successful. We can and I consider myself successful in domaining, but the point remains: A name on my hands is generally not as valuable as one on the hands of certain maga-dimainers.
nicely said
 
Impact
348
He has a portfolio of a few 100K domains (probably about 500K), started early and is a millionaire. He can afford to wait and probability works in his favor.

He seems to have done many things right, and that’s great. Good for him. Again, I am just trying to explain why tiletalk, who started the thread, is correct about this issue.

This is not to say that those of us who are not in Mann’ situation can’t be successful. We can and I consider myself successful in domaining, but the point remains: A name on my hands is generally not as valuable as one on the hands of certain maga-dimainers.

I believe it's not in the quality of the domain, as there may instances where you may have a better name.
It's because these successful domainers have larger portfolios (quality + quantity), established large client base, more visibility, better marketing strategies, better industry reputation, etc etc.
 
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Robert27

Established Member
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253
So part of the actual buying comes down to the buyer being able to justify to himself/herself, the board of directors, your partner (business/life) , friends, peers etc -

'well its got to be good because xxx was selling it. He/she has sold mega domains for millions to the biggest names in the industry.'

The more you sell the more you sell / success brings success.

Plus it just takes someone else thinking its a good domain bidding and creating interest and hype.
 
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