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What Do Domainers Gain By Ignoring?

Labeled as discuss in Domain Selling and Domain Sales started by jideofor, Feb 3, 2020.

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  1. jideofor

    jideofor Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    If you are in domaining for sales of your domains, what do you gain by ignoring emails requesting if a domain name is for sale?

    Will you eat your domain? I do not understand this sick attitude from some of you!
     
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  2. domeen

    domeen Top Contributor VIP

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    Some are too rich to care.
    Some do not want to talk to people. They do not like interacting with other people.
    Some feel offended with those $100 offers.
    People are different.
     
  3. Don Gondon

    Don Gondon Established Member

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    Thats a bit self-contradictory. If you know the domain owner is a seller, no point asking that :)
     
  4. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Leap.com PRO VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    One would gain a very precious thing, namely time not wasted dealing with unqualified inquiries.
     
  5. jideofor

    jideofor Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I disagree. Courtesy demand you either answer a yes or no. It is that simple. If someone ask whether your domain name is for sale, don't you think it is appropriate to answer them with a yes or no and also take things up from there?
     
  6. oldtimer

    oldtimer Do some good for humanity and the environment VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Don't take it personally if you don't get a reply to whether a domain is for sale or not from another domainer, you can just type the domain in to see if there is a sales lander for it and if there is one then most domainers would probably reply if they find an offer to be genuine and reasonable.

    Also if there is a sales lander for the domain a seller might consider it a disadvantage in future negotiations by replying to an email that doesn't start with a reasonable opening offer as the next question usually is how much do you want for the domain which most sellers would rather not disclose to those who have not made a substantial offer to start with as they might consider anything else as tire kickers who are going to waste their time and or are trying to extract critical info about the domain with no intension of buying it like for example to gauge the value of a similar domain that they might have themselves.

    IMO
     
  7. Sutruk

    Sutruk Established Member

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    Although it would be nice to get a reply everytime you send an email, nobody is obliged to answer your email, especially from a stranger.

    If you are really so interested about a domain, just make an offer. And if its a good offer, you will have more chances to get a reply.

    Anyway, the obvious answer to your question is this: No answer = No interest in selling.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2020
  8. biggie

    biggie Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Hi

    I feel what you mean, but you can't be courteous and be demanding, at same time.

    also, one assumes that an email, or their email in particular... is not an intrusion or an interruption, from the perspective of the receiver -
    the owner of the domain who doesn't anticipate it or may not want it, because they have received so many like it in the past.

    and lets not mention those emails from other domains, trying to sell you their fresh hand regs too

    but i get some inquires almost every day, either by pm or email and 90% don't make any offers.
    they just wanna kick on your tires and see how inflated they are....
    or how much air, they suck out of them

    majority of people who email you to inquire about a domain already know it's for sale.
    yet, some still ask the question.

    many don't want to show their hand first.

    imo...
     
  9. jideofor

    jideofor Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    What I can say is that we all see things differently due to pur socio-economic backgrounds. As much as I appreciate every response so far, I would, as a matter of courtesy, reply any email that require an answer.

    The domain name in question had no lander and I was not sure whether it was for sale or not, hence the need to ask whether it is for sale because I do not want to assume it for sale and if I made an offer straight out, wherein the domain name is not for sale, what do you think it would be?

    Not all domains will sell, even if you keep them for 100 years. So why not play your part by increasing the chances of it being sold when there is a window of possibility? Some domains will only get 1 inquiry in their lifetime of your possession.
     
  10. oldtimer

    oldtimer Do some good for humanity and the environment VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    If there is no sales lander for the domain then you should assume that it's not for sale because nowadays all domainers have some way to receive offers if their domain is for sale.

    You are right about always showing courtesy to others and we all should do that as much as possible, but some people might get hundreds of emails from the tire kickers every month or even evey week for their domains and it might just not be feasible for them to reply to all emails and that's why if their domain is for sale they usually make a sales lander for it that way they can respond to serious offers.

    IMO
     
  11. bmugford

    bmugford www.DataCube.com PRO ICA Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    As George pointed out, you save time.

    I will add, you also avoid the hassle. Many of the most terrible offers come from people with unrealistic expectations and a sense of entitlement.

    I focus on the inquires that have a chance on panning out.

    Brad
     
  12. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Such an email, among other things, may mean that:

    1) a corporate lawyer is collecting evidence to start UDRP. He will then say that the owner was looking to sell a domain to them (trying to prove bad faith).

    2) a spammer is looking for a price to spam the whole world offering the domain for sale as if the domain is already his, but with a higher price.

    As such, it is not strange that a lot of these inquiries are ignored. What is strange is that sometimes folks still reply to such inquiries, making themselves vulnerable to either 1) or 2).
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2020
  13. Brands.International

    Brands.International formerly lolwarrior Gold Account VIP

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    It really depends on how the email is formulated, who sends it, whether there is a correct introduction, whether there is a signature, and many other things. I need to see some thoughts and effort behind the email.

    If I get some rude email (something like "how much", even without questionmark) where I feel some sense of entitlement, or I feel something is not right, I delete it in 1 sec without second though, and without reply.

    There is no such thing as general courtesy - if someone wants nice interaction with me, they need to start with nice and polite interaction - otherwise I will just ignore them, or create bariers so I am not bothered.
     
  14. frank-germany

    frank-germany domainer since 2001 / musician VIP

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    I'm sure he has done so before posting here...


    an answer to your question

    is weakening the domain owners position
    in negotiation

    if he answers "yes"
    the sales price has gone down

    if he answers "no"
    the sale may disappear completely


    you bring trouble to people asking that exact question
     
  15. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Also, some other negative criterias (a call not to respond in domainer-2-domainer communications):

    - Using free web-based email, such as gmail.

    - Using tracking pixels. There is enough tracking around already, if I see an extra attempt to track me... I'd be less enthusiastic to respond. Even though such pixels would not work anyway, even with a rudimentary security on receiving end.

    - Specifically trying to hide an indentity. signing as John Smith @ gmail? Claiming to be a broker even though you are not? Using self-proclaimed 3rd party "brokers"? All this is negative, sorry, nothing personal!
     
  16. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Leap.com PRO VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    As others have pointed out, it depends on the circumstances. There are lots of good reasons not to answer, if the inquiry is not qualified, or if the answer can be misused in some way.

    Furthermore, it's generally a dumb question. At the right price almost any business asset is for sale, whether it's listed for sale or not. As others have suggested, one can distinguish oneself from all the other inquiries by simply making an offer in the first email, if you're trying to buy the domain.

    The owner could, if they wanted to be cheeky, simply respond with "Before I answer your question, are you attempting to buy our domain name?" Then, that puts things back in the original inquirer's court. If the answer is "no", then why did they contact the owner in the first place....? If the answer is "yes", then the owner could reply again with "what's your offer?", asking for the info that could/should have been in the very first email! Indeed, one can imagine many scenarios where the owner flips things around, so only the inquirer is answering all the questions.
     
  17. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    By the way,
    - it does not by itself mean that this someone is looking to purchase it.
     
  18. bmugford

    bmugford www.DataCube.com PRO ICA Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    It reminds me of an "offer" which is not actually an offer; something like "I was wondering if you would take $1,500".

    That phrasing is simply a question, not an offer.

    Brad
     
  19. HotKey

    HotKey Made in Canada VIP

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    I have never ignored. If you can't be bothered to enter a couple characters in response, maybe just consider unlisting the domain, or taking out the ability for a potential buyer to contact you with a private whois, or set up a contact form with input fields that filter out anything below a minimum offer.

    I get it, that time is precious. But a quick response is negligible in regards to time, as every inquiry is an opportunity to maximize exposure. A simple yes or no, even. You guys know, most these people will never email back again anyways, but at least you left the ball in their court.

    Invested time, ie. exploring the background of an inquiry, and initiating a negotiation, is a different story.

    **

    Eating domains is an interesting theory. I suppose you've ate your domain, if its gone unsold despite an inquiry or two. An intelligent person (Kate) on here once said, 'The first inquiry you get, may be the last.' Words to consider.
     
  20. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Also, anybody who is sending inquires through either domainagents (any amount) or godaddy domainbuy service (domain is worth > $5K) may not receive any response, and their initial offer may not be reviewed at all, regardless of the amount... if the seller already dropped or blacklisted escrow .com, or was blacklisted by escrow .com due to his country of residence (a few dozens countries at the time if this writing) - escrow .com is unfortunately obligatory to complete the transaction in both scenarios I mentioned.

    I beleive some domainers do purchase domainagents credits in bulk for this exact purpose: try to represent themselvers as endusers. At least I personally ignored a number of inquires to purchase different 4-letter coms through domainagents - must have been from other domainers, due to this specific market behavior at the inquiry time(s).

    Similar is applicable to non-U.S. based sellers who are receiving "Network Solutions certified offer service" solicitations - not only NetSol still requires owners full name and address to magically appear in whois, something that may not be technically possible nowadays, but they also use this address to mail paper check! Which is their only payment method even though we live in XXI century!. Nowadays it is not easy or frequently impossible to deposit foreigen checks outside the country they were issued in, many banks stopped offering this outdated service. So - no response in this case as well .I mentioned this for sake of completeness only, since domainers would not normally use netsol for any purpose :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2020
  21. .X.

    .X. God is great Gold Account VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    I don’t ignore them completely, after all these years I can tell an end user that just doesn’t know better as opposed to a low ball domainer or a scammer with an agenda. if I see it is an end user, I almost always send them a reply back and tell them the name is for sale , but to go to xxxx/.com and purchase it.
     
  22. Ntmt

    Ntmt Established Member

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    I'm happy to receive requests because it proves high value of a domain. Maybe that is because I do not own premium domains yet :)
     
  23. WatchDogue

    WatchDogue Top Contributor VIP

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    Privacy is what I gain, actually retain, by ignoring emails requesting if a domain name is for sale when that domain name is already listed for sale on a large domain name sales site.

    My names for sale on a large site are under domain WHOIS privacy - the way I like things.

    If somehow someone sleuthes out my old personal contact info for a name listed for sale on a name site they should then be aware the name is for sale!

    Why I don't reply to a " is this name for sale inquiry is simple " ;
    If
    I reply to the sleuth then likely personal data can and will be scraped from my email address etc and subject me to unwanted lowball offers and numerous " offers to sell me great names similar to mine " .

    I am private person without a sick attitude and, I have eaten very well in this life without answering annoying and obnoxious inquiries about " is domain name XXXXX for sale ? " when if you typed in the name you are taken to a for sale lander!

    I choose to offer names for sale on a popular large site - so their availability for purchase is clearly known to anyone interested in the name.

    As an aside, I also don't return unsolicited phone calls nor respond to unsolicited junk mail.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2020
  24. jideofor

    jideofor Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    The domain name is not listed anywhere. I do not know why most of the response assume it was listed somewhere and I still ask whether it is for sale. come on... I am not that stupid. If i had seen it listed, I would make an offer.

    and since it is not listed anywhere, that should tell you I wanted to engage the owner via whois email.
     
  25. biggie

    biggie Top Contributor VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    when you type the name in address bar, does it resolve to any kind of webpage?

    if not, then that, would be odd

    perhaps the owner is unresponsive or incapacitated in some way, which could be why you never got a reply.

    be interested to know the name if that was the case

    imo...
     

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