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Should you price a domain based on the buyer

Labeled as debate in Domain Selling and Domain Sales started by xynames, Jun 15, 2018.

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  1. Eric Lyon

    Eric Lyon Member Services, NamePros Super Moderator PRO Gold Account VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    That's an interesting perspective.

    Let's take a deeper look.

    Defining Unethical:
    Source

    The act of business in question: Adjusting prices for a digital product/property based on the consumers income, economical geography, and other value related data. Here's a 2005 case study and legal proceeding
    Source - CNN

    Franchises: Interesting tidbit about franchises that basically outlines how a McDonalds in Toledo, Ohio may charge less for a Bigmac than a McDonalds does in Anchorage, Alaska. Unless there is a contract outlining a flat/cap/min/max rate across the board, a franchise is free to charge what ever they want at their respective location. Generally they are competitive and not over-priced for the target demographic they cater to in the locations region.
    Source

    Note: Have you ever seen the price tag on a small bottle of coke at the Bellagio in Las Vegas? I have... They legally charge upwards of $5.00 for a tiny bottle or can of coke that I can get in Texas out of a vending machine for $1.00.

    I think in light of the above, price flux is common practice among businesses charging consumers sliding scale rates, so why should business to business or investor to business be any different?

    What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

    At the end of the day, it's business. Until there is a law to stop price-sliding in brick-n-mortar businesses, franchises, etc., there won't be one online either.

    What would be unethical, would be to allow only some businesses to price-slide to take advantage of consumers, but not to allow business to business or investor to business to price slide them right back.

    Just my thoughts on this topic anyways.

    To each their own, everyone does things differently and sometimes has a difference of opinion.

    Not the end of the world.

    It's an interesting topic. :)
     
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  2. johnnie018

    johnnie018 Account Auto-Closed

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    What other business makes up different prices depending on who the customer is or how rich they look? Maybe car salesman? Can we find definition of unethical to justify this?

    Bellagio charge $5 for a millionaire or a street tramp. Let's do but not pretend ethical.
     
  3. Eric Lyon

    Eric Lyon Member Services, NamePros Super Moderator PRO Gold Account VIP Trusted Contest Holder

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    Let's start by comparing the domain industry to a franchise. I actually did a long writup and comparison a couple years ago that might add more perspective:
    source

    Do you see any similarities in the full article breakdown?

    I suppose it's all perspective. Everyone has a different opinion.

    Do you have a law reference that prohibts the practice? That might be an intetesting read.
     
  4. equity78

    equity78 Top Member TLDInvestors.com TheDomains Staff PRO Gold Account VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    Well the one thing about all the stuff you quoted which was a solid post, thank you.

    The key points with domain names are there is no MSRP (Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price) and number 2 the product is not priced.

    If you have your domain names listed as make an offer, you are obligated to do nothing.

    When I walk into a store Best Buy does not say, You want to buy an ipad? Make us an offer, the price is listed and it does not matter if I walked in wearing an Armani suit or ripped sweatpants.

    The Bellagio doesn't care who pays $5 and does not adjust the price for the billionaire or hobo because they are happy with whoever is foolish enough to give them $5 rather than sit at a nickel slot machine and have a waitress come by and supply you with a free drink.

    Again all those products are PRICED to declare something unethical you would need something to base what is ethical on.

    If someone offers you $5,000 for a domain name and you do research and the research guides you to your counter offer at $20,000 that is your choice.

    Do you own the domain name in good standing? someone making an offer is just that, making an offer. Many people don't even reply.

    What would be unethical is if you had a domain name priced at Buy it now and then somehow found out it was Google and told the aftermarket site you would not push the name for the buy it now price. That would be unethical, but if your name is not priced who can say what fair value would be? they are only opinions and everyone has one, but only one person owns the domain name, and that's simply all that matters.
     
  5. johnnie018

    johnnie018 Account Auto-Closed

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    lol this is what spammers say, prove this is spam before da judge. Ok, you win, it is ethical! All domain industry will agree and nobody else!
     

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