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CraigD

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Post and discuss interesting articles & videos about science and technology.

You don't need to be an expert - just interested in the wonders of modern science, technology, and the history of these fields.

Please keep it rational, and post articles from reputable sources.
Try not to editorialise headlines and keep the copy to just a paragraph with a link to the original source. When quoting excerpts from articles, I think the best method is to italicise the copy, and include a link to the source.

Have some fun with your comments and discussions... just keep the sources legitimate.

Other threads:
The Break Room has a number of other popular threads, so there is no need to post material here that is better suited to these other threads:

- Covid19-Coronavirus updates and news
- Conspiracy Thread Free For All
- The *religious* discussion thread


Please enjoy!
 
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CraigD

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11,362
‘Heck of a ride’: SpaceX’s historic amateur astronauts splash down safely in Atlantic

The four-person crew thanked mission control as they splashed down in the Atlantic.

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https://www.theguardian.com/science...ic-amateur-astronauts-land-safely-in-atlantic
 
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CraigD

Top Contributor
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11,362
The Sad Reason Some Primate Moms May Carry Around Their Dead Infants

icc-behaviour_1024.jpg


Researchers have observed it in the wild many times: Primates from baboons to apes carrying around their infants after they've died. This happens regularly across non-primate species as well, but what's not clear is the motivation or reason behind it.

In the largest analysis of this kind of behavior in primates so far, a new study suggests that this infant corpse carrying (ICC) could be part of the grieving process, as far as we can tell. For example, there are links between the strength of the mother-infant bond and how long the carrying behavior continues.

...

As the researchers point out, our shared evolutionary history means that primate social bonds are likely to be similar to ours, but further study will be required to understand more about precisely what's going on here.

It's possible that early humans treated infant deaths in the same way as we see primates handling them here and that the rituals around death that we have in the modern day evolved from that point.

Read the article:
https://www.sciencealert.com/primat...und-their-dead-infants-as-part-of-their-grief
 
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Samer

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CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
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Samer

Restricted (15-30%)
Impact
21,196
Thanks

Yes, I've noticed that he isn't usually so generous with his praise.

LOL. He’s not so generous with his time:

What’s the last tweet before that one?

I will end on a good note;
Great Bloomberg article on Fossil industry (US) and commercial market, museum etc.

This link should bypass paywall;
i know… “.news” tld. That’s how you know it’s good, a part of me died to cite this URL;
100% .com! and dont you forget it; will cite a noncom to pass com PAYWALL! loved story;
On “team commercial” all the way, great piece;

https://apple.news/A_cAnYW8FR0GpS-aj2EQK2w

Samer
 
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Cal2

Top Contributor
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2,250
Application of 3D bioprinting in the prevention and the therapy for human diseases

Rapid development of vaccines and therapeutics is necessary to tackle the emergence of new pathogens and infectious diseases. To speed up the drug discovery process, the conventional development pipeline can be retooled by introducing advanced in vitro models as alternatives to conventional infectious disease models and by employing advanced technology for the production of medicine and cell/drug delivery systems. In this regard, layer-by-layer construction with a 3D bioprinting system or other technologies provides a beneficial method for developing highly biomimetic and reliable in vitro models for infectious disease research. In addition, the high flexibility and versatility of 3D bioprinting offer advantages in the effective production of vaccines, therapeutics, and relevant delivery systems. Herein, we discuss the potential of 3D bioprinting technologies for the control of infectious diseases. We also suggest that 3D bioprinting in infectious disease research and drug development could be a significant platform technology for the rapid and automated production of tissue/organ models and medicines in the near future.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41392-021-00566-8
 

CraigD

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Impact
11,362
Daylight saving was introduced in WWI to save fuel. Does it still reduce electricity consumption and costs?

In a couple of weeks, Australia's three time zones will become five as daylight saving time kicks in.

This means it will be brighter later, especially in southern parts of Australia. At the height of the Hobart summer, for instance, the sun doesn't set until nearly 9pm.

And this "longer day" was why daylight saving time was introduced — not just here, but around the world.

It was, in essence, a way to save fuel during World War I.

With more "usable" hours of daylight, people didn't have to use as much fuel to light up homes and businesses.

But that was more than a century ago. Does the "saving" part of daylight saving time still hold up today?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science...icity-lights-air-conditioning-power/100456470
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Iron ore price collapses below $100 as China extends environment curbs

The iron ore price sank below $100 a tonne on Friday for the first time since July 2020, as China’s moves to clean up its heavy-polluting industrial sector spurred a swift and brutal collapse.

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The Ministry of Ecology and Environment said in a draft guideline on Thursday that it planned to involve 64 regions under key monitoring during winter air pollution campaign.

The regulator said steel mills in those regions would be urged to cut production based on their emission levels during the campaign from October until the end of March.

https://www.mining.com/iron-ore-price-collapses-under-100-as-china-extends-environmental-curbs/
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Scientists locate how Alzheimer’s likely originates in huge breakthrough

Perth researchers have made a groundbreaking discovery in the fight against Alzheimer’s with a new report identifying the likely cause of the killer disease.

... researchers at Perth’s Curtin University in Western Australia found that toxic fat proteins can leak into the brain through the bloodstream – over time these proteins create the plaque-like deposits which cause the disease.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/h...h/news-story/385e19d3af683912bd7b70b469dd330a
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
GUY WHO KILLED PLUTO NOW PUSHING YET ANOTHER PLANET

One of the more controversial events to happen in the world of astronomy occurred when Pluto was demoted as an official planet in 2006. Now, one of the planetary scientists who lobbied the fiercest for the celestial object’s demotion says he found an actual planet worthy of recognition.

Caltech astronomer and planet killer Mike Brown claims he has found evidence of a potential planet in the Kuiper Belt roughly 100 billion miles from Earth, reports The Daily Beast. He explained to the publication that the object is possibly “six times more massive than the Earth and the fifth largest planet in our solar system.”


https://futurism.com/the-byte/guy-killed-pluto-pushing-planet
 

Cal2

Top Contributor
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2,250
Scientists locate how Alzheimer’s likely originates in huge breakthrough

Perth researchers have made a groundbreaking discovery in the fight against Alzheimer’s with a new report identifying the likely cause of the killer disease.

... researchers at Perth’s Curtin University in Western Australia found that toxic fat proteins can leak into the brain through the bloodstream – over time these proteins create the plaque-like deposits which cause the disease.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/h...h/news-story/385e19d3af683912bd7b70b469dd330a

Adding to this:

Landmark study presents evidence Alzheimer’s disease begins in the liver

"An impressive new study is presenting robust evidence showing the toxic proteins thought to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease may be produced in the liver and travel through the blood before landing in the brain causing neuron damage."

https://newatlas.com/science/alzheimers-disease-liver-lipoprotein-amyloid-origins-dementia/

 
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CraigD

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11,362

Thanks.

Quite interesting.

I almost turned it off when the narrator started talking about hidden geoglyphs being communication places for contact with extraterrestrial civilizations, but thankfully it didn't go any further ;)

The section about the protected native tribes got me thinking: They aren't even aware there is a world outside of their own, and that they are being shielded from it.

I guess ignorance can be bliss sometimes.
 
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J Sokol

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5,607
More on dementia:

More than 41m dementia cases globally are undiagnosed – study

Experts say getting diagnosed with the disease is vital, enabling those affected to receive support and treatment, which is more effective the earlier it begins, and to take part in clinical trials.

However, research by McGill University in Montreal, Canada, shows that in some countries as many as 90% of people with dementia have not been diagnosed. The stark findings, revealed in a report published by ADI, suggest that more than 41 million cases globally remain undiagnosed.

Dementia is one of the world’s biggest health challenges. Globally, the number of people living with it is expected to exceed 130 million by 2050.

https://www.theguardian.com/society...dementia-cases-globally-are-undiagnosed-study
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Scientists develop the next generation of reservoir computing

by Jeff Grabmeier, The Ohio State University

A relatively new type of computing that mimics the way the human brain works was already transforming how scientists could tackle some of the most difficult information processing problems.

Now, researchers have found a way to make what is called reservoir computing work between 33 and a million times faster, with significantly fewer computing resources and less data input needed.

In fact, in one test of this next-generation reservoir computing, researchers solved a complex computing problem in less than a second on a desktop computer.

Read on...
https://phys.org/news/2021-09-scientists-reservoir.html
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Elephants benefit from having older siblings, especially sisters
by British Ecological Society

A study of semi-captive Asian elephants in Myanmar has found that calves benefit from having older sisters more than older brothers. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology.

Researchers at universities in Finland, the UK and Myanmar have found that Asian elephant siblings influence younger offspring from early through to late-life. Being raised with older siblings strongly increased calves' long-term survival compared to not having a sibling, with elder sisters having a bigger impact than elder brothers.

Read on...
https://phys.org/news/2021-09-elephants-benefit-older-siblings-sisters.html
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Rates of infectious disease linked to authoritarian attitudes and governance: study

According to psychologists, in addition to our physiological immune system we also have a behavioral one: an unconscious code of conduct that helps us stay disease-free, including a fear and avoidance of unfamiliar—and so possibly infected—people.

When infection risk is high, this "parasite stress" behavior increases, potentially manifesting as attitudes and even voting patterns that champion conformity and reject "foreign outgroups"—a core trait of authoritarian politics.

Now, a new study, the largest yet to investigate links between pathogen prevalence and ideology, reveals a strong connection between infection rates and strains of authoritarianism in public attitudes, political leadership and even lawmaking.

Read on...
https://phys.org/news/2021-09-infectious-disease-linked-authoritarian-attitudes.html
 

Samer

Restricted (15-30%)
Impact
21,196
Daylight saving was introduced in WWI to save fuel. Does it still reduce electricity consumption and costs?

In a couple of weeks, Australia's three time zones will become five as daylight saving time kicks in.

This means it will be brighter later, especially in southern parts of Australia. At the height of the Hobart summer, for instance, the sun doesn't set until nearly 9pm.

And this "longer day" was why daylight saving time was introduced — not just here, but around the world.

It was, in essence, a way to save fuel during World War I.

With more "usable" hours of daylight, people didn't have to use as much fuel to light up homes and businesses.

But that was more than a century ago. Does the "saving" part of daylight saving time still hold up today?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science...icity-lights-air-conditioning-power/100456470

There US Bill currently stuck House Congress.
Wished it passed; Makes DST permanent.
https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/69?s=1
 
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J Sokol

Top Contributor
Impact
5,607
Electric air taxis to make their debut in Brazil’s most congested city

The skies over Latin America’s largest city are set to witness a futuristic aerospace revolution after the Brazilian budget airline Gol struck a deal that could see it ferry commuters around São Paulo in hundreds of low-cost zero-emission electric air taxis.

“It’s going to be an absolute disrupter. We’re going to democratise air travel,” Dómhnal Slattery, chief executive of the group that will provide the aircraft to Gol, claimed in an interview with the Financial Times.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/sep/21/electric-air-taxis-sao-paulo-brazil
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Here comes the Great Resignation. Why millions of employees could quit their jobs post-pandemic
ABC Radio National
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Has the pandemic made you rethink your career or deeply question the role of work in your life? If so, you're not alone.

In the US, COVID-19 has led to what's been dubbed the Great Resignation: millions of people, from frontline workers to senior executives, voluntarily calling time on their jobs.

According to recent research by Microsoft, more than 40 per cent of the global workforce are considering leaving their employers this year.

"The movement of talent is so significant and so sharp that it's different to probably anything we've seen in living memory," behavioural scientist Aaron McEwan, from global research and advisory firm Gartner, told ABC RN's This Working Life.

So what's driving this upheaval? And how will it reshape our career choices in big and small ways?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09...ion-post-pandemic-work-life-balance/100478866
 

CraigD

Top Contributor
Impact
11,362
Three Record-Breaking Quakes Have Been Detected on Mars, And They're Fascinating

NASA's Mars InSight lander has detected its three most powerful quakes yet.

On 25 August, InSight detected two quakes, at magnitude 4.1 and 4.2. Then, on 18 September – the lander's 1,000th Mars day of operation – it picked up the rumbles of another magnitude 4.2 quake.

https://www.sciencealert.com/three-major-record-breaking-quakes-have-been-detected-on-mars
 
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Cal2

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