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Labeled as discuss in The Break Room, started by CraigD, Oct 19, 2020

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  1. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    You certainly can.

    A particular job I did for a 4 year period required me to start at 5am. It took me about a month to readjust my lifestyle and bodyclock, but I soon learnt to love it, and naturally woke up at 3:30am without setting an alarm clock. Early morning is a very special time of the day. It's very quiet and peaceful.
     
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  2. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    First flight on Mars a success!

    It's not as ground beaking a moment as the Wright Brothers first flight, but congratulations guys :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2021
  3. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    /\

    We flew an aircraft on another planet for first time ever. Not ground breaking but space breaking:xf.grin:
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2021
  4. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    What is really amazing is that there is not much atmosphere/air for the rotors to grab.

    I think it is something like 1% of Earths atmosphere?

    Those little blades were paddling their heart out ;)
     
  5. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Single-use plastics dominate debris on the North Pacific's deep ocean floor

    By doing video surveillance deep in the ocean, researchers working in the North Pacific have discovered the densest accumulation of plastic waste ever recorded on an abyssal seafloor, finding that the majority of this waste is single-use packaging.

    The study, published March 29 in Marine Pollution Bulletin, highlights the huge environmental burden of single-use plastic, and also sheds more light on what happens to plastic once it goes into the sea.


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    "The majority of plastic debris that [ends] up in the ocean [is] missing," said Ryota Nakajima, a marine biology researcher at the Japan Agency for Marine Earth-Science and Technology. "Each year, more than 10 million tons of plastics make their way into the ocean, but the abundance of plastics floating on the ocean surface represents merely a few percent of the plastics in the ocean."


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    More precisely, between 4.8 million and 12.7 million tons of plastic makes its way into the ocean every year. Plastic in the ocean poses a huge threat to the safety of the environment, particularly when it deteriorates into microplastics. Plastic disrupts habitats, is mistaken for food by animals and spreads volatile toxins through the water.
     
  6. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    In fascinating new research, cosmologists explain the history of the universe as one of self-teaching, autodidactic algorithms.

    The scientists, including physicists from Brown University and the Flatiron Institute, say the universe has probed all the possible physical laws before landing on the ones we observe around us today. Could this wild idea help inform scientific research to come?

    In their novella-length paper, published to the pre-print server arXiV, the researchers—who received “computational, logistical, and other general support” from Microsoft—offer ideas “at the intersection of theoretical physics, computer science, and philosophy of science with a discussion from all three perspectives,” they write, teasing the bigness and multidisciplinary nature of the research.

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    Here’s how it works: Our universe observes a whole bunch of laws of physics, but the researchers say other possible laws of physics seem equally likely, given the way mathematics works in the universe. So if a group of candidate laws were equally likely, then how did we end up with the laws we really have?

    The scientists explain: “The notion of ‘learning’ as we use it is more than moment-to-moment, brute adaptation. It is a cumulative process that can be thought of as theorizing, modeling, and predicting. For instance, the DNA/RNA/protein system on Earth must have arisen from an adaptive process, and yet it foresees a space of organisms much larger than could be called upon in any given moment of adaptation.”

    https://www.popularmechanics.co.za/science/the-universe-is-a-machine-that-keeps-learning/
     
  7. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Researchers discover a new high-altitude Himalayan lake — and its waters are red
    The reddish hue of the lake is likely due to iron-rich minerals in the area


    Lakes come in all different sizes, shapes, and even colors: blue, pink, green, and brown.

    Now, scientists from the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) have reported a reddish-brown colored glacial lake in a remote region in the Northeast Himalayas. Scientists discovered this reddish lake using satellite images taken over the past 20 years.

    This high-altitude lake is situated 5060 meters above sea level, near the Zanskar valley, Ladakh in the Himalayan range. It is 11 kilometers (~7 miles) from the nearest village, and covers an area of approximately 0.2 square kilometers — about the size of New York City’s Grand Central Station. The lake is being fed by a northeasterly glacier, and the researchers suggest that it has either been formed or expanded due to glacial melt caused by climate change.

    The team predicts that the reddish hue of the lake is caused by the dissolution or mixing of iron-rich minerals such as hematite and goethite in the area; a reaction likely catalyzed by chlorine levels in the water or microbial weathering of sub-glacial bedrock. Because of the unique geochemistry in the area, the molecules in the lake are reflecting light at longer wavelengths, giving the lake the reddish color.


    Google Maps
     
  8. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Scientists probe mystery of 'thunderstorm asthma' event that sent thousands to the ER

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    Calls to emergency departments spiked in the wake of a thunderstorm that swept over Melbourne, Australia, in 2016. It was a rare outbreak of "thunderstorm asthma," the most severe ever recorded.

    Now, a new model, published April 14 in the journal PLOS One, hints that a combination of lightning strikes, wind gusts, low humidity and popping pollen grains may be to blame for the surge of asthma attacks following the storm, which contributed to the deaths of 10 people.
     
  9. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Team recovers ancient genomes from dirt, revealing new history of North America’s bears

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    When scientists need ancient DNA, they typically have to drill into teeth or bones—a process that can destroy delicate, sometimes irreplaceable, samples. And that’s assuming they have those teeth or bones in the first place.

    Now, researchers have shown they can recover not just high-quality ancient DNA from dirt but also close approximations of whole genomes. The samples in question—from a cave floor in northern Mexico—not only reveal another way to get such genetic material, they help clarify the history of North America’s ice age bears.

    The approach is a “huge breakthrough” for the ancient DNA field, says Anna Linderholm, an archaeologist at Texas A&M University who was not involved with the work. “We are just scratching the surface of what is possible when retrieving ancient DNA from sediments.”
     
  10. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Quantum Internet: A Revolution In Knowledge Is Almost A Reality

    IT’S NOT HYPERBOLE to say that a quantum-powered internet would be revolutionary. It would allow quantum devices to deliver astonishing levels of privacy and security, and the computational clout to solve the kinds of complex problems that would fry a classical computer.

    The countries and companies that have been busily laying the groundwork for a quantum internet have so far only been able to connect two quantum devices. But now, physicists at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands have successfully connected three quantum devices.

    This may not sound like much, but in quantum computing terms it’s huge.

    “This is the first time a network has been constructed from quantum processors,” lead study author Ronald Hanson tells Inverse. Hanson is an experimental physicist, Distinguished Professor at Delft University of Technology, and principal investigator at QuTech, a research center devoted to quantum computing and quantum internet.

    “A single direct link between two processors has been shown on many platforms in the past decade, but no network had been achieved.”

    These findings were published on Thursday in the journal Science


    WHAT IS THE QUANTUM INTERNET?

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    Quantum computing enables powerful processing at more than a hundred million times the speed of a classical computer. Put simply, a quantum computer is capable of processing every possible answer to a problem simultaneously. How it does this is brain-meltingly complex because it harnesses the bizarre, and largely still pretty mysterious, behaviors of quantum physics.

    Imagine the processing power of multiple quantum devices, or nodes, connected through a quantum internet. Experts predict that a global network of quantum computers could theoretically supply answers to some of our most challenging questions, like turning back climate change, curing disease, and solving world hunger. But the most immediate benefit is security.


    “Quantum communication networks bring in a fundamentally new security paradigm, not threatened by any amount of computing power: the security is in the physics of it,” Harun Šiljak, an assistant professor at the School of Engineering at Trinity College Dublin, tells Inverse. Šiljak was not involved in the new study.

    “When done right, such a secure communication protocol gives you the benefit of not having to trust anyone: hardware provider, software provider, network operator, or the state.”
     
  11. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Study reveals the workings of nature's own earthquake blocker

    A new study finds a naturally occurring "earthquake gate" that decides which earthquakes are allowed to grow into magnitude 8 or greater.

    Sometimes, the "gate" stops earthquakes in the magnitude 7 range, while ones that pass through the gate grow to magnitude 8 or greater, releasing over 32 times as much energy as a magnitude 7.


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    "An earthquake gate is like someone directing traffic at a one-lane construction zone. Sometimes you pull up and get a green 'go' sign, other times you have a red 'stop' sign until conditions change," said UC Riverside geologist Nicolas Barth.

    Researchers learned about this gate while studying New Zealand's Alpine Fault, which they determined has about a 75 percent chance of producing a damaging earthquake within the next 50 years. The modeling also suggests this next earthquake has an 82 percent chance of rupturing through the gate and being magnitude 8 or greater. These insights are now published in the journal Nature Geoscience.
     
  12. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Ocean currents modulate oxygen content at the equator

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    Due to global warming, not only the temperatures in the atmosphere and in the ocean are rising, but also winds and ocean currents as well as the oxygen distribution in the ocean are changing. For example, the oxygen content in the ocean has decreased globally by about 2% in the last 60 years, particularly strong in the tropical oceans. However, these regions are characterized by a complex system of ocean currents. At the equator, one of the strongest currents, the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC), transports water masses eastwards across the Atlantic. The water transport by the EUC is more than 60 times larger than that of the Amazon river.


    For many years, scientists at GEOMAR have been investigating in cooperation with the international PIRATA program fluctuations of this current with fixed observation platforms, so-called moorings. Based on the data obtained from these moorings, they were able to prove that the EUC has strengthened by more than 20% between 2008 and 2018. The intensification of this major ocean current is associated with increasing oxygen concentrations in the equatorial Atlantic and an increase in the oxygen-rich layer near the surface. Such a thickening of the surface oxygenated layer represents a habitat expansion for tropical pelagic fish. The results of the study have now been published in the international journal Nature Geoscience.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2021
  13. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    The real reason your cat sits on your laptop: To assert dominance

    It’s also unlikely cats are solely drawn to the warmth your laptop generates, either. “Yes, laptops emit heat and hot spaces are attractive to cats. But you need to ask why your cat doesn’t just sit by a radiator, for instance,” says Sands.

    The real attraction of your laptop to cats? Its scent. Or, to be more precise: the scent you regularly deposit there.

    “You won’t be able to sniff it, but a cat can smell you all over the keyboard,” says Sands.

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    “Cats are scent machines from the end of the tail to the tip of their nose. Their world is about scent – their eyesight’s developed for night-time hunting, meaning their sense of smell is really important at other times.”

    However, while it’s possible your cat may sit on your computer as they enjoy this scent, another explanation is far more likely, according to Sands.

    “It’s more probable your cat wants to deposit its own scent and supplant yours. It’s all about ownership – by doing this your cat is effectively saying ‘I own you!’
     
  14. J Sokol

    J Sokol Top Contributor VIP

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    US researchers seek citizen scientists as billions of Brood X cicadas set to emerge

    As New Yorkers nervously await the emergence of billions of cicada bugs set to swarm through their city and the north-east of the US, researchers are seeking to enlist citizen scientists to track the coming plague.

    The so-called Brood X of cicadas are set to emerge after 17 years underground. This particular cohort of the periodic insects will swarm in several large areas in the eastern US, as they prepare for one enormous mate fest, including New York’s Central Park and parts of the Bronx and Staten Island.

    Tracking the cicadas is as easy as snapping a photo. Anyone with a smartphone can download the free Cicada Safari app to help with data collection. Once the media is uploaded the app automatically captures the time, date and geographical coordinates. Once the images are verified, the information is mapped.

    https://www.namepros.com/threads/science-technology-news-discussion.1212824/page-106
     
  15. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    I think they also realise that it is obviously important to you, and the best way of getting attention is to annoy you by dominating that space.

    On that subject, what is it with cats pushing us out of bed or off the couch? They are small...why do they need to dominate the whole mattress or couch?

    And deliberately knocking things off the table... tapping it repeatedly with a paw till it reaches the edge and falls off, while watching your reaction. Arghhh!
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2021
  16. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    Tarantulas Are Basically All Over The Planet, And Scientists Can Finally Explain Why

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    Few spiders elicit as much reaction from humans as the famous and feared tarantula. These giant, hairy arachnids are known for their remarkable size, brilliant colors, and distinctive physical attributes.

    But it's not just the tarantula itself that is so impressively (albeit unsettlingly) large. So is the creature's footprint on the globe – which is surprising since tarantulas are relatively sedentary spiders; females and juveniles in particular rarely wander away from their burrows, if they do at all.

    Nonetheless, tarantulas (the Theraphosidae family of spiders) are to be found virtually everywhere, living on all Earth's continents except for Antarctica.

    "They are quite widespread and are found throughout the subtropical regions of every continent," a research team led by bioinformatician Saoirse Foley from Carnegie Mellon University explains in a new study.

    "[Their] behaviors do not portend that tarantulas would be successful dispersers, yet they have spread across the globe and have colonized strikingly different ecological niches."

    What can explain the successful migration of tarantula spiders to so many different corners of the globe?

    Read on...

    https://www.sciencealert.com/tarant...ywhere-and-scientists-can-finally-explain-why
     
  17. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    NASA's New Horizons reaches a rare space milestone

    ...on April 17 at 12:42 UTC (or April 17 at 8:42 a.m. EDT), New Horizons will reach a rare deep-space milepost—50 astronomical units from the sun, or 50 times farther from the sun than Earth is.

    New Horizons is just the fifth spacecraft to reach this great distance, following the legendary Voyagers 1 and 2 and their predecessors, Pioneers 10 and 11. It's almost 5 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away; a remote region where one of those radioed commands, even traveling at the speed of light, needs seven hours to reach the far flung spacecraft. Then add seven more hours before its control team on Earth finds out if the message was received.

    New Horizons was practically designed to make history. Dispatched at 36,400 miles per hour (58,500 kilometers per hour) on Jan. 19, 2006, New Horizons was and is still the fastest human-made object ever launched from Earth. Its gravity-assist flyby of Jupiter in February 2007 not only shaved about three years from its voyage to Pluto, but allowed it to make the best views ever of Jupiter's faint ring, and capture the first movie of a volcano erupting anywhere in the solar system except Earth.

    Read the full article:

    https://phys.org/news/2021-04-nasa-horizons-rare-space-milestone.html


    More information:

    https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Horizons

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  18. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    What Percy saw...

     
  19. CraigD

    CraigD Top Contributor VIP

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    Results From The World's Largest Wellbeing Study Are In: Here's What We Know

    For decades, researchers have known that positive mental wellbeing seems to deliver significant improvements in physical health, development, and lifespan – which suggests looking after your mind and mental state is one of the most effective ways to care for the rest of your body as well.

    But what's the best way to actually promote personal mental wellbeing? In a new study led by scientists in Australia, researchers cast a wide net, analyzing data from almost 420 randomized trials employing different kinds of psychological interventions to help improve mental states of wellbeing.

    The results – a meta-analysis examining data from over 53,000 participants involved in hundreds of psychological experiments – is being billed as the world's largest study of its kind on wellbeing, giving perhaps the most comprehensive overview ever on how interventions can help towards a healthy mind and body.

    In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and the myriad hardships it has brought all over the world, new insights on how to successfully bolster mental states are in high demand.

    "During stressful and uncertain periods in our lives, pro-actively working on our mental health is crucial to help mitigate the risk of mental and physical illness," says mental health researcher Joep Van Agteren from the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI).

    "Our research suggests there are numerous psychological approaches people should experiment with to determine what works for them."

    Read on...

    https://www.sciencealert.com/result...er-wellbeing-study-are-in-here-s-what-we-know
     
  20. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Winners of $20M contest make concrete to trap carbon dioxide

    Organizers of a $20 million contest to develop products from greenhouse gas that flows from power plants announced two winners Monday ahead of launching a similar but much bigger competition backed by Elon Musk.


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    Both winners made concrete that trapped carbon dioxide, keeping it out of the atmosphere, where it can contribute to climate change. Production of cement, concrete's key ingredient, accounts for 7% of global emissions of the greenhouse gas, said Marcius Extavour, XPRIZE vice president of climate and energy.

    "So it's not surprising that the winning teams focused on reducing emissions associated with concrete, which will be a game-changer for global decarbonization," he said in a statement.

    Meanwhile, Musk, the electric car and space entrepreneur, has pledged $100 million for researchers who can show how to trap huge volumes of carbon dioxide straight from the atmosphere and store the gas permanently. That competition will kick off Thursday, which is Earth Day.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2021
  21. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Microplastics found to alter shape of and de-cluster human lung cells

    A growing body of research has started to illuminate the widespread impacts of plastic pollution, and the downstream effects of it on the environment and human health. A new study has delved into the kind of damage microplastics can cause to human lungs, with researchers observing changes to the shape of lung cells and a slowdown in their metabolism when exposed to these tiny plastic particles.

    The research was carried out at Florida State University (FSU) and focuses on small fragments of plastic waste that have broken down in the environment. In the past few years, we've seen these microplastics turn up in Antarctic sea ice, near the summit of Mt Everest, in snowfall in the Arctic, and in human stool samples collected all around the world.


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    At the same time, scientists have started to investigate how these tiny particles can impact the health of various organisms, with studies finding they can cause aneurysms in fish, impair shell selection in hermit crabs and build up in plants to stunt their growth. The World Health Organization also launched a health review into the microplastics in bottled drinking water, while in separate but related research last week, plasticizers used in BPA-like plastics were found to likely cause alarming damage to brain cells.


    https://newatlas.com/science/microplastics-alter-shape-de-cluster-human-lung-cells/
     
  22. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    New Study Pushes Origins of Human-Driven Global Change Back Thousands of Years

    Conventional scientific wisdom holds that human-driven global change only began within the last few hundred years. But that theory neglects thousands of years of human history.


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    A new paper published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that people started changing the global landscape at least 12,000 years ago. This study, by scientists at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and others, explains how understanding people’s past land use strategies will help us better conserve global biodiversity now.

    “It’s a story of shifting patterns of land use,” said Erle Ellis, a professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the lead author on the study.
     
  23. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Earth's biggest mass extinction took ten times longer on land than in the water

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    Our planet's worst mass extinction event happened 252 million years ago when massive volcanic eruptions caused catastrophic climate change. The vast majority of animal species went extinct, and when the dust settled, the planet entered the early days of the Age of Dinosaurs. Scientists are still learning about the patterns of which animals went extinct and which ones survived, and why. In a new study in PNAS, researchers found that while extinctions happened rapidly in the oceans, life on land underwent a longer, more drawn-out period of extinctions.

    "People assumed that because the marine extinction happened over a short period of time, life on land should have followed the same pattern, but we found that the marine extinction may actually be a punctuation to a longer, more drawn-out event on land," says Pia Viglietti, a postdoctoral researcher at Chicago's Field Museum and the lead author of the PNAS study.
     
  24. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Utah Dinosaur Graveyard Indicates T-Rex Was Social Predator

    The Bureau of Land Management released a new study that indicted the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex traveled in packs and were not lone hunters as previously thought.

    The study, released Monday, came from years of work at a fossil site inside Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Southern Utah.

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    BLM Palentologgist Dr. Alan Titus discovered the Rainbows and Unicorns Quarry site in 2014.

    “We realized right away this site could potentially be used to test the social tyrannosaur idea. Unfortunately, the site’s ancient history is complicated,” Titus said. “With bones appearing to have been exhumed and reburied by the action of a river, the original context with which they lay has been destroyed. However, all has not been lost.”
     
  25. koolishman

    koolishman Top Contributor VIP

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    Gutenberg.org has about 62K downloadable free e-books. A great resource for learners.
     

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