New Namesilo Marketplace

Discussion in 'Domain Marketplace Reviews' started by cocaseco, Nov 10, 2015.

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  1. tonyk2000

    tonyk2000 Business Member Business Account ★★★★★★★★★★

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    On a forsale landing page, NameSilo clarifies to a visitor that

    What is a premium domain?
    A premium domain is a domain that is already owned by someone else and is therefore not available for regular registration.
    (quote end).

    See, in contrast:

    GoDaddy domainsearch results:

    What's a premium domain?
    Premium Domain Names are more valuable than other domains because they are based on common words or phrases people often use in their online searches.
    While GoDaddy does not own these domains names, we are one of a select group of registrars that can introduce you to the sellers.

    Netsol domainsearch results:

    Premium Domain Names, also known as Premium Resale domains, are priced higher than unregistered domains based on a variety of criteria including the number of characters in the domain, the number of years the domain has been registered, relevancy and popularity of the keyword, and the traffic it generates.

    ---

    It would probably make sense to amend "premium domain" definition @ NameSilo ...
     
    The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
  2. namesilo

    namesilo Active Member NameSilo Staff

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    Hi @Arca . Thanks for the feedback. We have updated the email that Buyers and Sellers receive when counters are placed to include a direct URL to the page to respond. We will also look into your other suggestion regarding placing an alert on the home page for obvious new accounts engaged in an offer/counter-offer sale.
     
  3. namesilo

    namesilo Active Member NameSilo Staff

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    Hi @tonyk2000 . Thanks for the suggestion. We have changed the verbiage to:

    "A premium domain is a domain that is already owned by someone else. Premium domains are more valuable than unregistered domains for a number of reasons including the age of the domain, popularity of keyword(s) in the domain and appeal to specific buyers."

    May take a few days for the change to get out to our entire network.
     
  4. Arca

    Arca Active Member VIP

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    Just wanted to share a "trick" I've been using to slightly increase my NS marketplace turnover. Sometimes I'm not able to reach a price agreement with a prospective buyer during negotiations, and as a result, not able to turn the offer into a sale. What can be very frustrating in these situations is that I often have further price flexibility on the domain. But for some reason a lot of end-users take my first counter offer as my final and lowest offer, and if they think it's too high they simply disappear rather than make a lower counter-offer. They could have made a lower counter-offer, and I would have accepted it a lot of the time, but instead they choose to end negotiations rather than counter-offering.

    Personally, whenever I get an inbound offer I always prefer to sell at the lowest price I can accept, rather than not make a sale at all and hold out for a more ideal price from another buyer. Especially if it's an average quality domain. As every domain investor knows, it often takes years before another interested buyer comes along, and in some cases another buyer may never materialize again. So I always prefer to sell if I have the chance to make a decent profit at a price I can live with, rather than hold out for the potential of a higher return years down the line.

    In these situations, after negotiations have ended but where I still had pricing flexibility, I usually delete the domain listing, and then list it again at the lowest price I am willing to accept. The namesilo system will then send the person who made the offer an email telling them the domain has been listed for sale again. Sometimes the buyer returns to check out the listing again, and upon discovering that the price has been lowered and is now close to or within their budget range they proceed to buy the domain. This only works occasionally, but the fact that it works at all makes it a nice last ditch effort to turn an inbound offer into a sale in some situations where the buyer is close to or within the range you are willing to sell the domain for. I find this to be most effective if I list the domain at a price very close to the buyer's last/final offer. Say if buyer came up to $1000, and that's a price I would have been happy to sell the name for, I would then list the domain again in the $1000-1250 range, and sometimes the buyer returns to buy it. This method is not going to work most of the time, but in some situations where you feel like the buyer might have bought the domain if only they had known your lowest/floor price, it can be a helpful technique to make a sale that would otherwise not have happened.
     
  5. Serengeti

    Serengeti Established Member

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    @Arca , Bro i don't know how you come up with these "techniques" .. but you sure do Rock. Thank you for that piece of pearl. Kudos to you.
     
  6. Embrand

    Embrand Active Member VIP

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    Great info!

    Can I ask if you use the Payment Plan option? And if yes, do you have buyers choosing this?

    I am also a bit worried if some potential buyers will be annoyed that they have to keep the domain at NameSilo for at least 60 days after purchase. Or maybe that is not a problem at all...

    Thanks.
     
  7. .X.

    .X. HappensOnline.com VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

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    What a great asset for NameSilo, NameSilo is pretty much an all in one, with all the options they offer

    @Embrand , I doubt the new owner will have a problem leaving their newly purchased name at NameSilo, If the buyer hangs around NameSilo for 60 days, They wont transfer their new accusation, They will move their portfolio to NameSilo ;)
     
  8. Embrand

    Embrand Active Member VIP

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    Yes, I think you might be right :xf.smile: Certainly some fantastic features. I love that you have registrar and sales platform in one place.
     
  9. Arca

    Arca Active Member VIP

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    I do use the payment plan option and I have buyers that pay for domains in this way. BIN at full-price and offer/counter-offer negotiations are more popular options than the payment plan, but there seems to be a growing number of people opting for the payment plan as well. Over the past 3 months I've sold 9 domains via the payment plan option. Two of them were set up after I negotiated with buyer over email, while the other seven were people who set up the payment plan via type-in/landing page.

    As for the 60 day lock, I don't think it's a significant problem for end-user buyers.
     
  10. Embrand

    Embrand Active Member VIP

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    That sounds good. Thanks for the insight!
     
  11. Arca

    Arca Active Member VIP

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    @namesilo - I realized that one thing that could make your email notifications when a domain has been re-listed to the marketplace more effective is if you start to include the BIN price of the domain in the notification email body (for domains that are listed with a BIN price). It's been a while since I last received one of those emails myself, but when I did, it only contained the domain name and not the price.

    These notification emails can prompt "former" prospective buyers to go check the listing, which can be used as a way to alert them to a price change, and if a domain is listed at a lower price, they might end up buying the domain after discovering the new list price. I was able to turn broken down negotiations into a sale most recently a few days ago by doing this. But at the same time, if you list the domain at a lower price to entice that buyer to buy the domain, whether or not they actually "discover" this new price (which in practice works as a final counter-offer) is entirely contingent on whether they take the time to navigate to the marketplace or domain landing page to actually check out the domain listing again after receiving the email notification. If a buyer does not do this, they might never realize that the domain has been re-listed at a different price.

    If you could start to include the BIN price in the notification email it would be more effective at getting somebody who has made an offer on a name in the past to buy it, as they are sure to take note of the new BIN price if it's listed in the email itself. Additionally, if the domain is re-listed at exactly the same BIN price as before, they don't have to waste time to go visit the marketplace only to find that the listing is unchanged, as an identical re-listing of the name would not really do anything to change their mind.
     
  12. namesilo

    namesilo Active Member NameSilo Staff

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    Hi @Arca . Thanks for the suggestion. We have added the BIN price (if provided) to the email notifications.
     

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