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question Geo domain question 2

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BetoWH7

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hello i have another question please, as i have learned that good GEO targeted domains are more valuable

what happens when the name is too long ?

for example, if i buy a domain with the geo Pennsylvania with the activity .com ( example pennsylvaniaplumbing.com ) ?
it will be a very long domain name
should i search for abbreviations instead?
 
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StartupNames

Upgraded Member
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Using abbreviations may not be a good idea.
 
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BetoWH7

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Musa Mo

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When you do research, do you see the abbreviation for PENNSYLVANIA on the end users websites? If you do then you can buy the abbreviation with the niche especially when the niche is a long service name
 
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BetoWH7

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125
When you do research, do you see the abbreviation for PENNSYLVANIA on the end users websites? If you do then you can buy the abbreviation with the niche especially when the niche is a long service name
thank you @Musa Mo i will pay closer attention and perhaps it is more common to use the abbreviation because people love to abbreviate things..
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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thank you @Musa Mo i will pay closer attention and perhaps it is more common to use the abbreviation because people love to abbreviate things..
In a state like Pennsylvania, where the name is quite long, it is usual to use the term "Penn" instead of the long name. "PennPlumbing" might be more practical, as an example. Pennsylvania is a bit challenging to spell as well, so the abbreviated version makes sense.
Having grown up and spent quite a bit of time in the state, I can say that the abbreviation always made sense and was commonly used.
 
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BetoWH7

Established Member
Impact
125
thank you @LoveCatchyDomains i guess this applies to the other long-name states as well, Minnesota?
Connecticut and the like.
 
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Some terms are just long, but they work if it is one concept.
For instance (City)(RealEstate).

I reported a $9K (4) word sale in that format on Twitter a few days ago.

One thing to keep in mind though is cities tend to do better than states.
BostonPlumbing.com is better than MassachusettsPlumbing.com, even outside the length.

It is more targeted for the end user, which brings more valuable leads.

Brad
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

Daring to LiveTop Member
Impact
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One thing to keep in mind though is cities tend to do better than states.
BostonPlumbing.com is better than MassachusettsPlumbing.com, even outside the length.
Yes, it's not just the length, it's how the heck to spell the name. "Massachusetts" can be a challenge to spell for even for the state residents!

thank you @LoveCatchyDomains i guess this applies to the other long-name states as well, Minnesota?
Connecticut and the like.
Curiously, I didn't see as much of a colloquial abbreviation tendency when I lived in Minnesota. "Minn" doesn't sound as catchy,perhaps. Your question is a great one, because it emphasizes that local customs and perceptions matter for these domain name choices.

One reason, I think, that "Penn" is more powerful in Pennsylvania is that it was the name of the founding father of the state -- William Penn ( "Sylvania" means forest in Latin). There is pride in this heritage, and Penn is a figure prominently displayed in Philadelphia.

For Connecticut, I've not seen a "Conn" abbreviation tendency as much there, but perhaps others have? Do other folks know of state colloquial shortenings, more appealing for domain names? On a brief check on the internet, "Tenn" for Tennesee may be one of them. "Indy" for Indiana may be another (like in the "Indy 500").

Hope that helps!
 
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BetoWH7

Established Member
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Yes, it's not just the length, it's how the heck to spell the name. "Massachusetts" can be a challenge to spell for even for the state residents!


Curiously, I haven't seen such an state abbreviation tendency when I lived in Minnesota. "Minn" doesn't sound as catchy, for one. Your question is a great one, because it emphasizes that local customs and perceptions matter for these domain name choices.

One reason, I think, that "Penn" is more powerful in Pennsylvania is that it was the name of the founding father of the state -- William Penn ( "Sylvania" means forest in Latin). There is pride in this heritage, and Penn is a figure prominently displayed in Philadelphia.

For Connecticut, I've not seen a "Conn" abbreviation tendency there, but perhaps others have seen that? Do other folks know of state colloquial abbreviations that are appealing for domain names? On a brief check on the internet, "Tenn" for Tennesee may be one of them. "Indy" for Indiana may be another (like in the "Indy 500").

Hope that helps!
thank you so much @LoveCatchyDomains yes i find the spelling difficult because English is not my native language, i believe that it needs study and more research to find tendencies that are catchy and used by the people that live there.
i believe conn is not a very good abbreviation as it might get associated with conn which is about convicted people i believe.
 
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BetoWH7

Established Member
Impact
125
Some terms are just long, but they work if it is one concept.
For instance (City)(RealEstate).

I reported a $9K (4) word sale in that format on Twitter a few days ago.

One thing to keep in mind though is cities tend to do better than states.
BostonPlumbing.com is better than MassachusettsPlumbing.com, even outside the length.

It is more targeted for the end user, which brings more valuable leads.

Brad
thank you Brad, and congratulations on the sale, that is awesome.
take care
 
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