Dan.com

question End user sales with the dash in their original domain name.

NameSilo
Impact
914
The past few years, I have found that end users who currently have a - in their domain are very receptive to someone who wishes to sell them the domain that doesn't contain the -. For example if you own RedCar.com and a business owns Red-Car.com they are very open to paying for the non-dash version.

I have done very well with this mindset, it has allowed me to flip domains very quickly to end users who wish to get a superior domain name. I guess the question I wanted to ask is simple...Do you find much luck with selling the non-dash version of a domain to end users?

Lets hear your thoughts. I'll share more details after a few comments on how I have done in the past.
 
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karmaco

Top Contributor
Impact
11,414
I wouldn’t know because I don’t invest in dash domains but who wouldn’t want the superior undashed version except for a few weirdo Germans?

The reason they didn’t get the undashed version to begin with is the real question. Most likely with great two worders not willing to pay what was being asked.

As long as people are diligent checking for trademarks before they hit anyone up (a currently used dashed domain doesn’t protect you from being udrp’d if they have a trademark but just didn’t pursue the non dashed) I see no harm as long as price expectations are low.

Alot of domainers use similar strategy with shorter upgraded versions of longer names. But I think it should always be done carefully because it is a form of targeting which if handled wrong could result in the appearance justly or not as squatting and intentional targeting of that one party.
 
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AEProgram

Top Contributor
Impact
7,232
Most care about upgrading. Some will only do it if it doesn't cost a lot, like under 500. Industries that are cheap, restaurants including pizza, towing, locksmiths. Even the big companies within these industries are super cheap. If you have something for them offer it in exchange for a bag of peanuts and napkins, they might counter to just offer you napkins, better than nothing.
 

HotKey

Made in CanadaTop Contributor
Impact
10,478
The reason they didn’t get the undashed version to begin with is the real question. Most likely with great two worders not willing to pay what was being asked.
For many words the dashed version is actually the correct spelling, so back in the day I'd imagine there was less focus on how it looks.

Search behemoth Google can differentiate some on total results for either, for example:

"well-being": 687M
"wellbeing": 548M

or

"in-between": 444M
"inbetween": 16M

and when looking at exact definition it will always show the proper spelling with the dash (hyphen).

Regardless, the unhyphenated version is stronger in most cases from a branding perspective.

OP is giving example of two-word terms (non-dictionary just two generic words placed together) and I think the same hyphen-focused mindset may have prevailed because of a readability advantage. Easier to see the two words being separated.

I've seen many of these with registrations predating the undashed versions.
 

phaethon

Established Member
Impact
369
I wouldn’t know because I don’t invest in dash domains but who wouldn’t want the superior undashed version except for a few weirdo Germans?

Not just the Germans! That applies to Europe generally and the UK. They will even choose the dashed version even if the 'premium' is available at registration fee.
That doesn't mean of course that those buyers are aftermarket buyers.
 
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