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discuss Afternic Domain Parking...Is it Really Godaddy Parking? Is this Good?

Dynadot

LoveCatchyDomains

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This week, I took the leap and placed a large group of domains under Afternic Parking, using the for sale "NS5,NS6" landers (no parking ads).
To my surprise, the lander has "GoDaddy" rather than Afternic is showing up on the landing page.
Is this good? My domains are being sold through Afternic, so it's puzzing why GoDaddy should appear? And, it raises questions, like their prohibition against listing domains in their auctions and for sale pages that are expiring within 90 days.
Any thoughts on this? in
 
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My domains are being sold through Afternic, so it's puzzing why GoDaddy should appear?
Hi

back to your original question -

if you set nameservers to ns1.afternic.com/ns2.afternic.com, then the page will show Afternic in header, instead of Godaddy....but it will have ppc ads.

ie: http://homeloanapplication.com/


imo...
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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if you set nameservers to ns1.afternic.com/ns2.afternic.com, then the page will show Afternic in header, instead of Godaddy....but it will have ppc ads.
That's good to know as an alternative. At this point, it's unclear that it really would matter much which name shows up. The reality is that GoDaddy and Afternic both have brand name recognition.
My greater concern is that 30+ page contract they need to sign in order to proceed with the purchase, along with the additional transfer fee added on checkout. I wonder how many times they lose a potential buyer at that step.
 
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I wonder how many times they lose a potential buyer at that step.
Hi

when not viewed in a snapshot...
then longevity, track record and volume of transactions can be seen.

from that perspective,
pondering any loss of transactions that could have occurred from contract hurdles, is one that's overlooked in comparison.

on other hand:
you also have to look at that "hurdle" as one that has to be jumped over,
as it serves as a means to "bind" the "potential" to any transaction they may initiate.

you want the seller or buyer to follow-thru with the deal, so some formality has to be agreed to

imo...
 

LoveCatchyDomains

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you want the seller or buyer to follow-thru with the deal, so some formality has to be agreed to
The 30+ page agreement may have its merits, but, to me, its intimidating and hard to fully understand.
There is one domain parking company that has a wonderful series of "explanation" clauses for legal agreement. Basically, the clause helps summarize each section, explaining what you are agreeing to.
I wonder if any of the domainers here have heard issues raised by buyers about their refusing to sign long legal contracts for the sale.
GD's NS5/6 lander is elegant in its simplicity. The subsequent steps to finalize the sale appear necessary to protect all parties involved. I wonder, though, if the contract could be more "user friendly," concise and understandable.
 
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to me, its intimidating and hard to fully understand.

I wonder if any of the domainers here have heard issues raised by buyers about their refusing to sign long legal contracts for the sale.
I wonder, though, if the contract could be more "user friendly," concise and understandable.

Hi

i edited quote and focused on what you seem to focus on more, which is something that nobody else seems to be concerned with.

not saying the agreement language is perfect,
but at same time, i don't see the need to dwell, ponder or wonder, about something you can't measure or factor into, to account for any assumed loss of sales due to contractual language.

just as you can't say how many transactions were completed when the buyer or seller thought about not proceeding with deal,
but they did so only because they signed a contract.


still:
if, you have specific lines that you can take from such contracts and re-write them to a level, that's equal to your level of comprehension, or condense them without removing pertinent legal terms and their implications... then you can submit it for review.

and good luck, with that!

imo...
 
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LoveCatchyDomains

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just as you can't say how many transactions were completed when the buyer or seller thought about not proceeding with deal,
but they did so only because they signed a contract.
So, as far as you know, nobody tried to back out of a deal with a GoDaddy transfer because they refused to sign that long contract? Instead choosing to use a different marketplace venue or escrow for the sale?

You're probably right, that the lengthy contract probably isn't a big issue to folks in general. Thanks for the insight, as always.
 
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So, as far as you know, nobody tried to back out of a deal with a GoDaddy transfer because they refused to sign that long contract? Instead choosing to use a different marketplace venue or escrow for the sale?
Hi

most that use a different marketplace, venue or escrow service,
may do so simply because those alternatives may have lower commission fees or transaction costs.

for example, other sellers including myself, may use escrow.com and ask the buyer to pay the fee
therefore netting total proceeds from the sale or you can split the cost or assume it all.
( even when assuming total fee at escrow, it may still be lower than the 20% > 35% some places charge)
some also use paypal, crypto, wire, etc. when deal originates outside of a marketplace.

and none of that, could have anything to do with the willingness or not, to sign any pre-sale/pre-purchase contracts.

however, if the offer or BIN is made on a specific platform, then the seller may not be able to exercise those choices.
and typically, that's where both parties have already agreed to the agreements and TOS of that marketplace.

imo....
 
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