NameSilo
James Iles

Should We Rename New gTLD's?

Views:
1,941
Comments:
38
By James Iles, May 30, 2019
  1. James Iles

    James Iles NamePros Writer PRO Gold Account VIP Trusted Blogger

    Posts:
    1,541
    Likes Received:
    12,864
    In 2012, ICANN started the monumental process of releasing the new class of domain extensions. This represented the largest introduction of new extensions in over two decades. As such, over 1,900 applications were submitted to ICANN, with 751 of those applications being contested. Large corporations such as Google and Amazon submitted 101 and 76 applications respectively.

    By November 2013, following a lottery and a public comment period, extensions such as .BIKE, .GURU and .CLOTHING entered the sunrise period.

    Since then, according to ICANN, 1,230 domain extensions have been introduced into the Internet, with over 26.2 million domains registered. Based on statistics from nTLDStats.com, the most popular extensions to date in terms of overall registrations are .TOP, .XYZ and .LOAN, followed by .CLUB and .SITE.

    Google has released the popular .APP and .DEV extensions, which have amassed over half a million domain registrations between them.

    Throughout all of this, the most popular term to describe these new extensions is “new gTLD”. The “gTLD” comes from the acronym for “Generic Top-Level Domains”. ICANN describes these extensions as “New gTLD’s” repeatedly on their website, and it has become a widely used term amongst investors, often shortened to “nTLD” (new top-level domain).

    The idea of these new gTLD’s came into fruition in 2012, meaning that the concept is seven years old this year. Can something that is seven years old still be described as “new”? In 2012, a Bitcoin was worth $13, the iPhone 5 was new to the market, and the first of the Avengers movies was released.

    Whilst there are new extensions being released, the concept of a "new gTLD" is firmly embedded into the minds of most investors, and end users, particularly in emerging tech sectors, are familiar with these extensions, even if they do often opt to operate on other ccTLD's or gTLD's. Could the fact that these are "new" extensions even be putting potential end-users off using them?

    I thought it'd be interesting to see what a host of popular registrars use to describe "new gTLD's". GoDaddy has a whole section dedicated to "New Domain Extensions", NameCheap uses the term "New TLD's", and Uniregistry uses "New Domain Extensions".

    Although this may be a pointless endeavor, I would like to pose the question: should we rename "new gTLD's"? I have heard the term "vanity TLD's" being used before, but I don't think this accurately describes the new format.

    My own personal preference would be to call the flock of new extensions "expansion TLD's (eTLD's)", as these extensions expand on the original group of .COM, .NET and .ORG extensions. This is by no means an original phrase, as I have seen it mentioned a couple of times in historical blog posts. However, I think it fits the bill well.

    Could the rebranding of "new gTLD's" to something that gives these extensions a sense of history, establishment, and permanence attract more potential users to these extensions?
     
    The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of NamePros.
  2. Next Article
    Top Topics: How Do You Acquire a Portfolio?; Making Money With AdSense in 2019...
    Previous Article
    Top Topics: I Sold PaladinDrones.com for $7,500; A Domain Investing Guide...
  3. Loading...
  4. James Iles

    About The Author — James Iles

    James is the lead writer for NamePros' Blog and founder of Iles Media, a domain name broker working on both acquisitions and outbound sales. For all inquiries relating to stories and interviews, please email: [email protected]

    This is James Iles's 656th blog post on NamePros. View all blog posts

    Home Page:
    https://about.me/iles
    Actions:
    Follow
  5. Comments (38)

  6. Recons.Com

    Recons.Com Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    5,552
    Likes Received:
    10,641
  7. MrAcidic

    MrAcidic Upgraded Member Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    1,496
    Likes Received:
    2,450
    replace the g with an e? It is still the same concept......

    how about...M for modern, A for advanced, L for latest. Etc etc etc.......

    You can't fit a square peg into a round hole....
     
  8. James Iles

    James Iles NamePros Writer PRO Gold Account VIP Trusted Blogger

    Posts:
    1,541
    Likes Received:
    12,864
    Haha! ;)

    The question regarding new gTLD's was something I'd considered recently, and I thought it may make an interesting debate. I'm sure GoDaddy, for example, have tested other potential names for this type of extension, but ultimately settled on "new domain extensions". Curious to see whether something like "expansion TLD's" would affect (positively or negatively) on the registration rate for certain tlds.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2019
  9. Recons.Com

    Recons.Com Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    5,552
    Likes Received:
    10,641
    The need to rename will come after the second round.

    Probably, nGTLD will refer to them still, but there will be R1 nGTLD, R2 nGTLD etc.
     
  10. lovedomains.com

    lovedomains.com Binance Gang 2019 Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    1,105
    Likes Received:
    1,759
    Call it what you like

    - pigeon sh*t (old favorite)
    - tutti frutti candy soda pop
    - racketdomains
     
  11. James Iles

    James Iles NamePros Writer PRO Gold Account VIP Trusted Blogger

    Posts:
    1,541
    Likes Received:
    12,864
    I'd like to disclose that I have no new g's in my portfolio (although I have one that is used as a redirect for my business), so mine is an observation from the sidelines.
     
  12. lovedomains.com

    lovedomains.com Binance Gang 2019 Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    1,105
    Likes Received:
    1,759
    nor do I.

    some ngtlds looks great on the eye.

    Alchemy makes fools gold into gold (AU) and ngltd alchemy does happen. But it's rare AF and people are heavy bag holders with their renewals.

    There are all sorts in the world, domaining is tough enough as is.
     
  13. wesley sweatman

    wesley sweatman durfer Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    3,136
    Likes Received:
    4,793
    Ty gtld is fine by me. Thats how i learned it.
     
  14. wwwulff

    wwwulff Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    1,714
    Likes Received:
    4,726
    No, I don´t think so and I don´t think many of them have a future no matter what you call them - The only thing that might help is to set some fixed and reasonable prices to renew them and release them on a first come first served basic without premium prices (I only have 3 new g's in my portfolio).
     
  15. Corey

    Corey bonus space available Gold Account VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
    12,972
    Likes Received:
    15,256
    No need to Rename New gTLD's

    Cheers
    Corey
     
  16. lolwarrior

    lolwarrior Founder, Brands.International VIP

    Posts:
    5,057
    Likes Received:
    6,250
    I personally would like they stay "new gTLDs"...

    there is already enough confusion in this space, no need to create another one by renaming, imo :)
     
  17. Recons.Com

    Recons.Com Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    5,552
    Likes Received:
    10,641
    Well, you could... just the square has to be small enough ;)
     
  18. MrAcidic

    MrAcidic Upgraded Member Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    1,496
    Likes Received:
    2,450
    hooowwww smalll
     
  19. Grilled

    Grilled khjasdhkfdhdskfhhukdfshkj VIP

    Posts:
    4,492
    Likes Received:
    5,973
     
  20. equity78

    equity78 Top Member TLDInvestors.com TheDomains Staff PRO Gold Account VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
    12,517
    Likes Received:
    10,131
    Noncoms because domaining has become binary either a com or noncom.
     
  21. garptrader

    garptrader Top Member VIP ★★★★★★★★★★

    Posts:
    2,799
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    I believe that by lumping hundreds of extensions into one category, registrations and sales (even registry sales) can make investors view them in a more positive light. While many small sales do not get reported, it is pretty clear that most investors in the newer extensions are deep in the red.

    I cannot think of many things that are five years old that would be considered new. A five year old computer may work but is ready to be replaced. A five year old car will likely still drive but maintenance costs will start increasing. A five year old pair of running shoes likely needs to be thrown in the garbage.

    Extensions need to stand on their own and sales reports from the registries should be footnoted. .com sales do not get inflated with registry sales.

    Let us not forget what a domain is supposed to be used for - creating a website.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2019
  22. Argentum

    Argentum Established Member

    Posts:
    563
    Likes Received:
    413
    New gtlds is same as bitcoins, in one word SCAM.
     
  23. hookbox

    hookbox Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    2,362
    Likes Received:
    4,757
    Going from one generic term to another generic term will do nothing. Branding is about being original and being as far away from the norm as possible.
     
  24. lovedomains.com

    lovedomains.com Binance Gang 2019 Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    1,105
    Likes Received:
    1,759
    you'll be buying the top, will sell a $BTC to you later @ $400k
     
  25. droned

    droned Established Member

    Posts:
    328
    Likes Received:
    96
    I call them "Top-Level Domains".
     
  26. dande

    dande UNNATURE.COM VIP

    Posts:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    856
    The "new" has nothing to do with the age. New simply signify that they came into existence later than the older extensions.
     
  27. Fancy.domains

    Fancy.domains Selling gTLDs like delicious hotcakes Gold Account VIP

    Posts:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    9,122
    Just ”gTLD” works fine with me.
     
  28. Internet.Domains

    Internet.Domains Top Member VIP

    Posts:
    1,496
    Likes Received:
    3,552
    True. Although "noncom" would seem to imply everything that is not .com, including country codes. The NewG's would still need a name to be specific to their attributes (or lack of attributes, depending on who you talk to:xf.grin:).

    To add, I feel that when Donuts called them "Non-com's" they made a monumental marketing mistake. :xf.eek:
     
  29. GCCinternet

    GCCinternet Established Member

    Posts:
    484
    Likes Received:
    54
    Time spent on discussing newgTLDs is time wasted. Naming of newg is the least from the least relevant topics.
    NewgTLDs have always been a business for registries and only for them. Statistics have been screwed up so many times that they don't matter at all. I regularly see extra domains inserted into my NetSol account, although I have never even sent an availability check; they just added them to my account without asking permission.

    What matters is the demand and regular consistent track record of premium domain sales, not one sale once in a while (perhaps a sponsored sale, subsidized, brokered or incentivized in other way by an army of sellers having the goal to promote the sale), but a trend.

    Whoever wants to treat domain investing seriously should focus on .com - the only one online standard and ccTLD in these (mostly and rather only European) countries, where the ccTLD is essential part of market (eg. Germany, UK, NL, PL, FR). It's difficult enough anyway. ~AW
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2019
NameWorth
  1. NamePros uses cookies and similar technologies. By using this site, you are agreeing to our privacy policy, terms, and use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
Loading...